Rosemonde E. and Emile Kuntz collection: National period, 1804-1950 | Louisiana Research Collection

By LAC Group

Collection Overview

Title: Rosemonde E. and Emile Kuntz collection: National period, 1804-1950

ID: LaRC/Manuscripts Collection 600 (C-National period)

Primary Creator: Kuntz, Felix H. (Felix Herwig), 1890-1971.

Extent: 9.0 Boxes

Arrangement:

Arranged chronologically by topic. The collection as a whole consists of 41 boxes. The collection has been divided into ten series, and six sections in Archon. The first five series have been made into their own Archon "subcollections" by topic and the remaining four have been grouped together in a sixth "subcollection:

French Colonial period

Spanish Colonial period

National period

Municipal records

Papers of individual and families

Other records (Theatre and Opera, Printed and Visual material, Newspapers, and Additions)

This finding aid is described at the item level. As a general rule each piece has a separate entry, but the cataloguers occasionally grouped several related documents under one heading. The entries begin with a date and a bibliographic caption. The latter consists of two parts. The first, in the form of a title entry, identifies the general nature of the piece, the main participants in its creation, and the place. In the second there are technical data - notes on the type of document and language. A synopsis of the item follows. Here, square brackets denote interpolated explanatory or identifying remarks, bibliographic citations, and publication information. The spelling of persons' names and the use of diacritical marks generally follow that found in the documents, and, consequently the name of an individual may differ from document to document. We have regularized the spellings only of well-known historical figures or of those persons that appear with frequency in the documents.

Date Acquired: 00/00/1956. More info below under Accruals.

Subjects: Claiborne, William C. C. (William Charles Cole), 1775-1817., Davis, Jefferson, 1808-1889., Jackson, Andrew, 1767-1845., New Orleans (La.) -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865., Slave records., Slavery -- Louisiana -- History -- 19th century.

Forms of Material: Conveyances., Correspondence., Inventories., Orders (military records)

Languages: English, French, Spanish;Castilian

Scope and Contents of the Materials

This finding aid covers Series 3, the National period, of the Kuntz collection.

The Kuntz collection consists of historical documents relating to the historical and cultural development of Louisiana and more specifically New Orleans. The materials date back as far as 1655 before the founding of Louisiana and continue onward through the French colonial period, the Spanish colonial period, and the National period to the mid-twentieth century.  Documents include those from the Company of the Indies as well as the papers of Francisco Bouligny that describe early French and Spanish authority over Louisiana. The National period documents Louisiana's entry into the United States through the Civil War and its growth as a major commercial center. Materials in these three sections include correspondence, land sale documents, slave sales, plantation journals, orders, property sales, professional and family papers, legal documents, and land grants. The New Orleans municipal records (1805-1850s) include an 1805 census, license permits for business, tax receipts, and pay vouchers. There are also bonds posted by free people of color to secure permits to live in the First Municipality of the city. The small personal and family collections include those of John McDonogh, the Pontalba family, and Pierson family. The theater and opera materials consist of New Orleans theater and opera programs, primarily from the nineteenth century. Carnival material is made up of invitations and dance programs of various local krewes from late nineteenth century New Orleans. The printed and visual items consist of political broadsides, maps, engravings, and photographs. The newspaper collection contains copies of French-language newspapers of Louisiana and New Orleans and New Orleans newspapers printed during the Civil War. The last section consists of additions to the collection as a whole.

<span style="font-size: 11.9999990463257px;">Items that have been digitzed as a part of the Free People of Color in Louisiana project can be found here: </span>http://cdm16313.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/search/collection/p16313coll51/searchterm/600/field/part/mode/exact/conn/and/order/nosort<span style="font-size: 11.9999990463257px;">. </span>

Biographical Note

Felix Herwig Kuntz was the son of Rosemonde Elizabeth and Emile Kuntz and the brother of Emile N. Kuntz. The family's wealth was from his grandfather's having been awarded a legendary diamond necklace by the Hapsburg Emperor Maximilian of Mexico for outstanding service in representing the interests of the Bank of Austria to Imperial Mexico before its 1867 fall. He used the sale of the diamonds to finance various land purchases throughout Southern Louisiana, notably in the Oil and Gas rich Terrebonne Parish. Kuntz, who ran a real estate firm, was an avid collector of documents, paintings and furniture during and after the Great Depression.

The documents in this collection were items that Kuntz collected for his own personal interest. Kuntz approached officials of Tulane University in the early 1950s with the proposal to donate his collection as a memorial to his parents, Rosemonde E. and Emile Kuntz, whose names the collection would bear. To facilitate access to the material he requested, as a condition of the gift, that the school prepare and publish a detailed catalogue. At the time of the first donation in 1954, Tulane University gave Kuntz assurances that, in recognition of his munificence, the school would indeed publish such a catalogue. Felix Kuntz donated his collection in stages, starting in 1954. At the time of the last donation in 1970, the gift had exceeded 3,500 manuscripts and printed ephemera, and many hundreds of rare books and pamphlets. As the University received each of the gifts, various cataloguers, working under the direction of Connie Griffith, then Head of the Manuscripts Division, processed the documents by sections and prepared descriptions of the materials in the separate groups. Guillermo Nanez Falcon compiled and edited the volume in 1981. The Kuntz collection is one of the Louisiana Research Collection's most popular collections. LaRC is pleased to present the online version of the Kuntz catalog, which retains the comprehensiveness of the original published catalog.

Subject/Index Terms

Claiborne, William C. C. (William Charles Cole), 1775-1817.
Davis, Jefferson, 1808-1889.
Jackson, Andrew, 1767-1845.
New Orleans (La.) -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865.
Slave records.
Slavery -- Louisiana -- History -- 19th century.

Administrative Information

Repository: Louisiana Research Collection

Accruals: Additional materials added in 1956, 1958, and 1970.

Access Restrictions: Collection is restricted. Most of the collection has been digitized and placed online. Researchers are asked to consult the online version of the collection first. If the researcher requires the original documents, please ask for assistance from the Special Collections staff.

Use Restrictions: Physical rights are retained by the Lousiana Research Collection. Copyright is retained in accordance with U.S. copyright laws.

Acquisition Source: Felix Herwig Kuntz

Acquisition Method: Gift.

Preferred Citation: Rosemonde E. and Emile Kuntz collection, Manuscripts Collection 600, Louisiana Research Collection, Howard-Tilton Memorial Library, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118.

Processing Information: Collection processed by Guillermo Náñez Falcón in 1981.

Finding Aid Revision History: Finding aid information entered in Archon by LAC Group in 2011.


Box and Folder Listing


Browse by Series:

[Series 3: National period],
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Series 3: National period

Series III, the National period, encompasses the dynamic epoch of New Orleans when the French-speaking city, as part of the United States, experienced the influx of English-speaking Americans and grew from a small provincial capital into a major commercial entrepôt. It was the era that brought rapid agricultural development and new wealth to the lower Mississippi Valley. Documents in this section are a particularly rich source for the study of the economic and social history of southern Louisiana from 1804 through the Civil War. A unique item here is the commission that appointed William C. C. Claiborne to be Governor of the Territory of Orleans. It is written on parchment and is signed by Thomas Jefferson as President of the United States and countersigned by James Madison as Secretary of State.

Additionally there are numerous acts of sale of urban and rural properties, estate inventories, acts of mortgage, land patents, slave sales, and inventories of slaves. Papers relate to the Beauvais, Bouligny, Dauterive, Kernion, Ozenne, and Thibodaux families, among others, and there is considerable documentation about free people of color. Outstanding are the letters of the commandant at La Balize (1812-1813); plantation journals; several Andrew Jackson items; and papers of New Orleans philanthropist John Fink.

The Civil War period includes personal letters from several Louisiana Confederate soldiers; five letters of William Tecumseh Sherman at Paducah, Kentucky (1862); letters and orders relative to the Federal occupation of New Orleans; orders and pay vouchers of the Mississippi State Troops; the letter book of Confederate General Albert Sidney Johnston, Headquarters of the Western Department, and that of Major General John M, Palmer (USA); as well as letters and orders that concern the Civil War in Louisiana. For the post-War period there is the correspondence of Jefferson Davis with regard to his controversial removal from command of General Joseph E. Johnston in 1864.

Box 7: National period, 1804-1815
Folder 1: Act of sale of property, a transaction between Antonio Lanclos and his son Antonio Lanclos, [Jr.], both of the Iberville District, 1804 January 17

Document. Certified copy, dated 1833 February 8, signed by John Dutton, Judge, Iberville Parish. In Spanish.

Antonio Lanclos and his wife Madalena Molinos, through their representative Pedro Braud, sold to their son Antonio Lanclos, Jr., for fifty pesos, a piece of land situated on the right bank of Bayou Lafourche in the Iberville District. The property was part of a larger tract purchased by the elder Lanclos from the Chitimacha Indians on 1802 June 18.

Folder 2: Act of sale of property, a transaction between Antonio Lanclos and Emerant Lanclos, both of the Iberville District, 1804 January 19

Document. Certified copy, dated 1833 February 12, signed by John Dutton, Judge, Iberville Parish. In Spanish.

Antonio Lanclos and his wife Madalena Molinos, through their representative Pedro Braud, sold to Emerant Lanclos for fifty pesos a piece of land situated on the right bank of Bayou Lafourche in the Iberville District. The property was part of a larger tract purchased by Lanclos from the Chitimacha Indians on 1802 June 18.

Folder 3: Act of sale of property, a transaction between Federico Kimball, New Feliciana, vendor, and Roberto Cochran and Juan Rhea, buyers, Baton Rouge, 1804 January 27

Document. Certified copy, signed by Carlos de Grand-Pré. In Spanish.

Before Carlos de Grand-Pré, Governor of the Post at Baton Rouge, appeared Huberto Rowell of Baton Rouge, representing Federico Kimball, to sell to Messrs. Cochran and Rhea, partners, for 1,000 pesos, a tract of land of 250 square arpents situated in New Feliciana.

Folder 4: Receipt issued by Richard J. Avery, New Orleans, to Captain Robert Davis, 1804 March 10

Autograph document signed. In English.

Avery acknowledged receipt of $1.60 harbor master's fees from Captain Davis of the Experiment.

Folder 5: Inventory of cannon, carriages, shot, shell, implements, et cetera, deposited in the powdery magazine at New Orleans, circa 1804 March 24

Document. Signed: J. Blanque; Const. Freeman. In English.

Jean Blanque, Commissary of Commercial Relations in New Orleans, acting on behalf of the French government, and Lieutenant Colonel Constant Freeman, acting for the United States government, stated that they were unable to take complete inventory of the material stored in the powder magazine. The present document, they explained, was a provisional estimate of the objects in question, the value of which they judged to be $30,000. Appended were copies of certifications made by French officials. Verso is an unsigned statement made by Freeman dated 1807 March 30, that all the items listed in the inventory were delivered by him in the condition described to Mr. Desforgues, who took possession of them in the name of the United States government by order of General James Wilkinson.

This item can be found in the Collection 600 Oversize Area, Drawer 1.

Folder 6: Receipt issued by Richard J. Avery, New Orleans, to John McDonogh, 1804 May 18

Autograph document signed. In English.

Avery acknowledged receipt of $5.19 harbor master's fees from McDonogh.

Folder 7: Act of sale of property, a transaction between Louis Bouligny and Daniel Clark, both of New Orleans, 1804 June 1

Document. Notarized contemporary copy signed by Pierre Pedesclaux. In French.

Before Notary Pierre Pedesclaux, the minor Louis Bouligny, assisted by his brother Dominique Bouligny, executor of the estate of Joseph de Maison Rouge, sold to merchant Daniel Clark for 12, 000 piastres a piece of land situated in the Ouachita Territory, consisting of 208,344 arpents, part of the concession made to Maison Rouge by Governor Carondelet in 1797. A plan figuratif of the land made by Charles Trudeau was given by Bouligny to Clark. Not included in the sale were lands under cultivation established under titles anterior to the concession, and also five arpents on Bayou de Barthelemy that Maison Rouge left to the Irish servant Marie.

Folder 8: Act of sale of property, a transaction between Daniel Clark and D[ominique] Bouligny, both of New Orleans, 1804 June 12

Document signed. In Spanish.

Before Notary Public Narciso [or Narcissus] Broutin, New Orleans, Daniel Clark, merchant, sold to Dominique [or Domingo] Bouligny, for 6,000 pesos cash, one-half of a tract of land encompassing thirty superficial leagues on the Ouachita River. The property was the same that Clark had bought from Luis [or Louis] Bouligny on 1804 June 1.

Folder 9: Act of sale of property, a transaction between Daniel Clark and D[ominique] Bouligny, both of New Orleans, 1804 June 12

Document. Notarized contemporary copy signed by Narcissus Broutin. In Spanish.

This is a copy of the preceding document.

Folder 10: Plat and surveyor's certificate for land claimed by Antonio Son, District of Feliciana, 1804 June 12

Document. Certified copy, dated 1804 June 30, signed by Carlos Trudeau. In Spanish.

Assistant Surveyor Vicente Sebastiano Pintado certified that he surveyed for Antonio Son a piece of ground measuring 784 1/2 square arpents, situated in the District of Feliciana, about 1 1/2 miles east of the Feliciana River and 3 3/4 north of its confluence with the Mississippi.

Folder 11: Petition submitted by the widow of Lieutenant Colonel Pedro Gerardo de Villemont in New Orleans to the Commissioners of His Catholic Majesty; endorsement of the Marqués de Caso Calvo, New Orleans, 1804 June 21, 26

Documents signed. Signed: Coulange veuve De Villemont; El Marq. de Casa Calvo. In Spanish.

Francisca Petit de Coulange, widow of Lieutenant Colonel Pedro Gerardo de Villemont, Assistant Military Commander of the Province of Louisiana, stated that in connection with Spain's cession of Louisiana, she was among those who, for various reasons, could not change domicile to Spanish territory. Therefore, she entreated the Commissioners to order that she continue to receive, from the Royal Treasury at Pensacola, the pension previously awarded her.

Alongside the petition is an endorsement, dated June 26 and signed by the Marqués de Casa Calvo, which certified that, in accordance with the King's decree of 1803 December 18, the widow de Villemont was to be paid the annual pension due her through the Treasury at Pensacola.

Folder 12: Commission issued by President Thomas Jefferson, Washington City, to William C.C. Claiborne, 1804 August 30

Document. Signed: Th. Jefferson; James Madison, Secretary of State. Parchmont. Attached paper seal of the United States. In English.

President Jefferson appointed William C.C. Claiborne Governor of the Territory of Orleans.

This item is the cage.

Folder 13: Regulations issued by Vicente Folch, Governor of West Florida, "to be observed by the Sydics and Alcalds [sic] of the Jurisdiction of Baton Rouge", 1804 October 30

Printed document. In English.

Governor Folch issued a set of seventeen regulations aimed at strengthening Spanish authority in West Florida. Local officials were to register all the inhabitants of their district and to make an inventory of land under cultivation, slaves, and livestock. Persons of bad reputation would not be allowed to settle in the area, and all newcomers had to take an Oath of Allegiance to Spain. Trade with the Indians was prohibited. Syndics were charged with the repair of roads and bridges, and they were to prevent illegal cutting of timber on Crown lands. All taverns had to have a license. Syndics and Alcades were to lead assistance to officers of the militia, and they were to render a statement of accounts to the Governor every six months. [McMurtrie, Louisiana Imprints, Number 44; published in LHQ, IX, 405-410.]

Folder 14: Act of sale of property, a transaction between Jacques Vignes and Jean Pierre Laurans, both of Pointe Coupée, 1804 November 4

Document. certified copy, dated 1836 April 23, signed by A. Robin, Judge, Point Coupée Parish. In French.

Before Julien Poydras, Commandant of the Pointe Coupée post, appeared Jacques Vignes, who sold to Jean Pierre Laurans [or, Laurant] for 2,100 piastres cash a residential lot in Pointe Coupée, bounded on two sides by land belonging to the widow Pierre Descoux. Laurans allowed Vignes free use of the house, gardens, and pasture lands on the property for two years.

Folder 15: Receipt issued by Richard J. Avery, New Orleans, to an unnamed person, 1804 December

Autograph document signed. In English.

Avery acknowledged receipt of $14.56 for surveyor's, physician's, and harbor master's fees.

Folder 16: Personal letter from Boutard, Rouen, to Madame Dauberville Bouligny, New Orleans, 1804

Autograph letter signed. In French.

Boutard gave an account of times he had met with M. de Milleville at his château near Dieppe to discuss the rights of Mme Bouligny to Milleville's succession. This was followed by copies of correspondence Boutard had had in regard to a rent claimed by Mme Bouligny from Milleville. As the latter, in his final letter, dated 1804 February 3, had concluded and presented proof that he owed Mme Bouligny no money. Boutard suggested that she examine her documents to prove her claim as well as her degree of kinship to Milleville.

Folder 17: Certificate of service of Captain Pedro Larronde, 1805 March 18

Document. Signed: Jose Ma Morcillo; Manl. Artazo. In Spanish.

Lieutenant Colonel José Maria Morcillo, Spanish officer at Pensacola, certified that the accompanying certificate of service of Captain Pedro Larronde was a true copy of the record in his charge. Larronde had entered the Louisiana Regiment in 1778 as a distinguido and served until 1804. During the war with England he had participated in the capture of Baton Rouge, Mobile, and Pensacola. In 1784 he had taken part in the expedition against the cimarrones.

Folder 18: Official letter from [Minister of the Treasury] [Miguel Cayetano] Soler at the Spanish Court in Aranjuez to Intendant Juan Ventura Morales [in New Orleans]., 1805 May 22

Letter. Uncertified [contemporary?] copy. In Spanish.

Miguel Cayetano Soler, Spanish Minister of the Treasury, informed Intendant Juan Ventura Morales of the report he had received from Foreign Minister Pedro de Cevallos concerning the state of diplomatic negotiations between Spain and the United States Ministers, James Monroe and Charles Pinckney. The North Americans made four basic demands: 1) that Spain indemnify United States citizens for losses caused during the war with England; 2) that Spain indemnify United States ship-owners for losses caused by French privateers operating out of Spanish ports; 3) that Spain indemnify the United States for losses suffered as a result of Spain's suspension of the right of deposit at New Orleans; 4) that the eastern boundary of the Louisiana Territory be the Perdido River (thus giving the United States title to Spanish West Florida) and that the western boundary be the Río Bravo (thus giving the United States, Texas and a part of New Spain). Although the King saw some justice in the first claim, he rejected the others [even after Monroe had modified considerably the United States' pretensions]. Soler discussed in detail the Spanish point of view. His Majesty was willing to concede the [present-day] Sabine River as the western boundary, Soler wrote, but Monroe, finding his proposal unacceptable , considered his mission at an end, had requested his passport, and was preparing to leave Spain. Owing to the uncertain situation created by the failure of the negotiations, Soler had ordered the Viceroy of New Spain and the Intendant of Havana to render to Morales whatever assistance he might need for the defense of His Majesty's dominions.

Folder 19: Certificate of sale of slave by Reynaud and Peytavin, Acadia County, to Juan Guillot, no place, 1805 August 3

Document signed. In French.

Reynaud and Peytavin, Pointe des Houmas, declared that on 1804 April 2 they sold to Jean Guillot a young, untrained Negress (une jeune negritte Brute) for the sum of 450 piastres.

Folder 20: Order issued by Carlos Ximenez, New Orleans, to Estevan de Quiñones, no place, 1805 October 22

Autograph document signed. In Spanish.

In accordance with the order issued by the Intendant Juan Ventura Morales on 1805 October 21, Ximenez requested Quiñones to cancel the surety bond for 2,000 pesos guaranteed by Juan Deneses in 1796 for Pedro Filiber, manager of the Royal warehouse at Plaquemines.

Folder 21: Business letter from John Goddard, Baltimore, to Messrs. Shepherd Brown and Company, New Orleans, 1805 December 31

Autograph letter signed. In English.

Goddard requested that Shepherd Brown and Company furnish him a statement of the settlement they paid to Messrs. [Beverly] Chew and [Richard] Relf in the Kennedy affair.

Folder 22: Act of sale of property, a transaction between Pierre Laurant and Jean Jarreau, both of the County of Pointe Coupée, 1806 January 6

Document. Certified copy, dated 1836 April 25, signed by A. Robin, Judge, Pointe Coupée. In French.

Before Julien Poydras, Judge of the County of Pointe Coupée, appeared Pierre Laurant [or, Laurans] and Jean Jarreau. Laurant sold Jarreau for 4,000 piastres a residential property that he had acquired in Pointe Coupée from Jacques Vignes.

Folder 23: Will and testament of Maria Olivares, widow of Joseph Galvez, New Orleans, 1806 February 5

Digital surrogates for items in this folder can be found here: http://cdm16313.contentdm.oclc.org:80/cdm/ref/collection/p16313coll51/id/2427.

Document. Notarized copy, dated 1806 March 28, signed by Narcissus Broutin. In Spanish.

The widow Galvez declared that she was born in the Canary Islands, the legitimate daughter of Andres Hernandez and Josefa Olivares. She was a resident of Barataria, where she owned land and some sixty head of cattle. Her chattels included two slaves, a male and female, and the latter was to be freed after the death of Mrs. Galvez. She appointed as the executors and universal heirs of her estate Maria Dauberville, widow Bouligny, and Luis Bouligny.

Folder 24: Plat and surveyor's certificate for land claimed by John Jerrow, Pointe Coupée Parish, 1806 May 24

Document. Signed: Morgan, Deputy Surveyor. In English.

At the request of John Jerrow [or, Jean Jarreau], Deputy Surveyor Charles L. Morgan surveyed a tract of land of 1,224 acres, situated on the Mississippi River in Pointe Coupée Parish. The land was bounded by property of Joseph Fadericks [sic] and of Monsieur Barry.

Folder 25: Deposition of Francis Caisergues, New Orleans, made before Notary Public Peter Pedesclaux, 1806 June 2

Document. Signed: Peter Pedesclaux. Countersigned: William C.C. Claiborne. Two attached seals. In English.

Francis Caisergues, merchant in New Orleans, swore before Notary Pedesclaux that the items, described on the bill of lading, which is shipped on the Sarah (Richard Sutton, Master), were bound for the port of Bordeaux and [were neutral goods], as no citizen of any of the belligerent powers, [namely, England of France], owned a share of or had an interest in the cargo. On the reverse side is a certificate signed by William C.C. Claiborne attesting that Pedesclaux was a duly licensed Notary.

Folder 26: Act of sale of property, a transaction between François Munhall and Adelaide Raguette, both of New Orleans, 1806 July 2

Document. Notarized copy, dated 1834 May 27, signed by Fx. Grima. In French.

Before Notary Public John Lynd, New Orleans, appeared François Munhall who sold to Mlle Adelaide Raguette [or, Raguet], [f.w.c.], for 2,500 piastres, a property situated about two leagues downstream from New Orleans on the west bank of the Mississippi. The land was bounded on one side by property of the vendor and on the other by that Barthelemé Duvergé.

Folder 27: Petition of Edith Smith, widow of Juan Bulher, Baton Rouge, 1806 July 29

Document. Certified copy, dated 1836 July 22, signed by Ch. Tessier, Judge, Baton Rouge. In Spanish.

Edith Smith, widow of Juan Bulher [or, Buhler] petitioned the local tribunal to make final settlement of her husband's estate, to grant her clear title to certain properties left by her husband, and to order a revaluation of said properties. Following the petition is a copy of the inventory and evaluation made of the property of Juan Bulher, 1794 January 10.

Folder 28: Act of sale of property, a transaction between Jean Jarreau and Salvador Pamias, both of the County of Pointe Coupée, 1806 September 25

Document. Certified copy, dated 1836 April 25, signed by A. Robin, Judge, Pointe Coupée. In French.

Before Judge Julien Poydras, Pointe Coupée, appeared Jean Jarreau, who sold to Salvador Pamias for 5,300 piastres a property bounded on one side by land of the widow of Pierre Descoux and on the other by that of the buyer. The sale was contingent upon certain conditions, which are given in the document.

Folder 29: Personal letter from Boutard, Rouen, to Madame Dauberville Bouligny, New Orleans, 1806 November 1

Autograph letter signed. In French.

Boutard had learned that M. de Milleville was greatly enamored of his young wife. he was unconcerned about his relatives in Louisiana and predisposed to those in France. Mme Bouligny could thus expect to receive only a part of the Dauberville lands. Boutard wrote that if he was responsible for raising her hopes for a large share of Milleville's estate, it was only because he had heard from acquaintances that she was one of the principal heirs. Under the new inheritance laws, she must establish her relationship with a complete genealogy compiled from papers in Milleville's possession. Only after his death would she be able to do this. He suggested that she correspond with the heirs and to curry their favor by sending gifts of provisions that were in short supply on account of the blockade.

Folder 30: Decision rendered by the Tribunal in Baton Rouge to the petition of Edith Smith, 1806 November 3

Document. Certified copy, dated 1836 July 22, signed by Ch. Tessier, Judge, Baton Rouge. In Spanish.

Carlos de Grand-Pré, for the Tribunal, allowed Edith Smith, widow of Juan Bulher and now wife of Ricardo Devall [or, Duval], to retain possession and enjoy clear title to the properties she received from her deceased husband. [This item is filled with the document to which it is attached, Petition of Edith Smith, 1806 July 29.]

This item is in Box 7, Folder 27.

Folder 31: Indenture of Sophia Haas in favor of Dr. John Watkins, New Orleans, 1806 November 28

Document. Signed: J.M. Haas; John Watkins (twice, once as Mayor); Mansury Pelletier, witness. In English.

John Martin Haas and his wife Sophia, natives of the Principality of Orange, indentured their daughter Sophia Haas, age four, for the term of twelve years to Dr. John Watkins, Mayor of New Orleans, for the sum of $140, passage money from Hamburg to New Orleans on the Lewis William, paid to Benjamin Morgan, shipowner.

Folder 32: Receipt issued by Henry Molier and Company, New Orleans, to John McDonogh, 1807 January 14

Document. Unsigned. In French.

The receipt was for $150 that John McDonogh paid for two large copper boilers, other copper tools, and one iron poker, which he bought at auction from Henry Molier and Company.

Folder 33: Sale of slave by A. Bonnamy to Arnaud Beauvais and by the latter to Jean Baptiste Beauvais, 1807 February 23, March 16

Documents. Signed: C.B. Dufau [for Bonnamy]; Ad Beauvais. In French.

In New Orleans on 1807 February 23, C.B. Dufau, agent for A. Bonnamy, sold to Arnaud Beauvais, resident of Point Coupée, for 550 piastres in cash, an untrained black male (un negre Brut) age about eighteen, of the "Maninga" [i.e., Mandingo] nation. The slave had arrived from Charleston on the ship La Caroline and after Beauvais had examined and accepted the man, the sale was without any further guarantee. On March 16, Arnaud Beauvais resold the slave to Jean Baptiste Beauvais for the same price and on the same conditions.

Folder 34: Receipt issued by Jean Baptiste Tounoir, Pointe Coupée, to Jean Baptiste Beauvais, 1807 March 25

Document signed. In French.

Jean Baptiste Tounoir, co-heir of his deceased parents and en-charged with recovery of debts due the succession, acknowledged having received from Jean Baptiste Beauvais 240 piastres for items Beauvais had bought from the Tounoir estate.

Folder 35: Passport issued by James Sullivan, Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, to John Colbert, a black man, 1807 July 13

Digital surrogates for items in this folder can be found here: http://cdm16313.contentdm.oclc.org:80/cdm/ref/collection/p16313coll51/id/2409.

Document signed. Countersigned: Jona. L. Austin, Secretary; (verso) William C.C. Claiborne. Attached paper seal. In English.

John Colbert, a black man, and his wife and three children, citizens of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, were to be allowed to travel freely to New Orleans. Verso, Governor Claiborne wrote and signed the following note: "The within Passport has been exhibi[ted] to the undersigned, and is entitled to full credit."

Folder 36: Power of attorney given by Daniel Clark, New Orleans, to Joseph Leblanc, Iberville Parish, 1807 August 25

Document. notarized contemporary copy, signed by Pierre Pedesclaux. In French.

Before Notary Pedesclaux, New Orleans, Daniel Clark, merchant, appointed as his procurator Joseph Leblanc to represent him in the sale of a piece of land in Iberville Parish to Paul Chaisson. Clark had acquired the property from Catherine Hipp.

Folder 37: Residency permit issued by Mayor James Mather, New Orleans, to John Colbert, a free black man, 1807 November 24

Digital surrogates for items in this folder can be found here: http://cdm16313.contentdm.oclc.org:80/cdm/ref/collection/p16313coll51/id/2406.

Document signed. Attached paper seal. In French with an unsigned English translation.

Mayor Mather certified that he had examined the papers presented him by John Colbert and had found them to be in order. Colbert and his wife Teenah and their three children were therefore to be permitted to travel freely and reside within the city limits and to enjoy the fruits of their labor.

Folder 38: Plats and surveyor's certificate for land claimed by Jean Dugats on Bayou Lafourche, 1807 December 18

Document. Notarized contemporary copy, signed by Pierre Pedesclaux. In French.

Pursuant to an order from the Surveyor of Lands of the United States, Henry surveyed a tract of land on Bayou Lafourche claimed by Jean [or, John] Dugats. The lot measured to have 183.91 acres.

Folder 39: Act of sale of property, a transaction between Dominque Bouligny, New Orleans, and Louis Bouligny, New Orleans, 1807 December 31

Document. Notarized copy, dated 1808 January 11, signed by Narcisse Broutin. In French.

Before Notary Broutin in New Orleans Dominique Bouligny sold to his brother Louis Bouligny, for 6,000 piastres, one-half of a property situated in Ouachita Parish. This was part of the land that the vendor had acquired from Daniel Clark on 1804 June 12 and that Clark had purchased from the aforementioned Louis Bouligny on 1804 June 1.

Folder 40: Deposition of Margaret Young made before Mayor James Mather, New Orleans, circa 1807-1812

Document signed. Countersigned: Jas. Mather. In English.

Margaret Young appeared before the Mayor to make a sworn statement about events of the previous night. Between eleven and twelve a loud knocking at her door awakened her. Upon her refusal to open the door, the man knocking threatened to break it down. She sent for a neighbor, Charles Still, for help. Still ordered the man to leave and struck him. The man brought a companion, and together they threw brickbats at the deponent's house and at Still's. Some time elapsed before the night patrol arrived and arrested the assailants. The deponent identified Leopold Turkeim, present in the room, as one of the attackers.

Folder 41: Inventory of the estate of Louise Viguet, deceased, New Orleans, 1808 May 19

Document. Signed: Cuvillier, Deputy Register. In French.

Pierre Ambrose Cuvillier, Deputy Register of the Court of Proofs of the Territory of Orleans, went to 12 Saint Charles to make an inventory and evaluation of the effects of the deceased Louise Viguet. Appraisers were D.D. Dessartes and Pierre Piquery. There follows a listing of clothing, linens, and furniture that were valued at $623. As the house itself belonged to Antoine Carraby, it was not included in the appraisal.

Folder 42: Sale of slave by Captain Jean Lugeol, Pointe Coupée, to Jean Baptiste Beauvais, 1808 June 1

Autograph document signed. In French.

Captain Lugenol of the brig Adventure, coming from Charleston, acknowledged receipt of 450 piastres from John Baptiste Beauvais for a young untrained female slave, age about ten or eleven, that Beauvais had purchased.

Folder 43: Passport issued by Civil Commissioner Thionville, Civil and Police Commissariat, Pointe-á-Pitre, Guadeloupe, to Madame Marguerite Montamat, 1808 June 14

Document signed. Countersigned: Mitton, Army Commandant. In French.

The document permitted Mme. Montamat to leave the island without restrictions and travel to the United States with her five children and her Negro servant Jeanne.

Folder 44: Act of sale of property, a transaction between Julien Poydras and Pierre Laurans, both of Pointe Coupée Parish, 1808 November 30

Document. Certified copy, dated 1836 November 16, signed by A. Robin, Judge, Pointe Coupée Parish. In French.

Before Judge Peter Dormenon, Pointe Coupée Parish, appeared Julien Poydras, who sold to Pierre Laurans [or, Laurant] for 1,000 piastres land, situated on False River Island, bounded on one side by property of Jacques Vignes and on the other by that of the vendor. The tract was without buildings or cultivated area.

Folder 45: Act of donation of a slave by David Lejeune and his wife, New Feliciana, to Carlota Bauvais, 1808 December 23

Document. Certified copy, dated 1809 January 13, signed by Thomas Estevan. In Spanish.

Before Thomas Estevan, Commandant at Feliciana, David Lejeune and his wife Constanza Bauvais signed an act of donation, by which document they gave their niece Carlota Bauvais, to be her slave, a little Negro girl named Ana, approximately seven years old, a "Criolla." The child was their property by virtue of her having been born in their home of their slave Isabel.

Folder 46: Receipt issued by the Courrier de la Louisiane, New Orleans, to John McDonogh, 1809 October 14

Document. Signed: Thierry and Dacqueny. In French.

Thierry and Dacqueny acknowledged receipt of five piastres from John McDonogh for a subscription of six months to the Courrier de la Louisiane.

Folder 47: Deposition of Nicolas Peret made before Justice of the Peace Marc Lafitte, New Orleans, 1810 April 18

Document signed. In French.

Nicolas Peret, a butcher and resident of Faubourg Saint Mary, before Justice of the Peace Lafitte made a sworn statement of what he knew concerning the oral agreement between Marigny Dauterive and Antoine Sarzax [Sarrax?]. The former, according to Peret, had obligated himself to deliver an unspecified number of cows and calves to Sarzax, who agreed to pay eighteen piastres for each cow, eight piastres for each calf over a year old and five piastres for each calf younger than that.

Folder 48: Sale of slave by Daniel S. Norton to Asa Norton, both of the County of Attakapas, 1810 October 2

Document signed. Countersigned: Thomas Gardner, witness. In English.

Daniel S. Norton sold to Asa Norton a black male named George, age seventeen, for $500.

Folder 49: Power of attorney given by Madame de Lisa, New Orleans, to Jean Baptiste Beauvais, Pointe Coupée, 1811 February 13

Document. Signed: Marie Fransoize Moro famme Lissa; Jph de Lisa. In French.

Marie Françoise Moro, wife of Joaquin Joseph de Lisa, with her husband's consent, granted power of attorney to Jean Baptiste Beauvais to sell for her a slave named Honoré.

Folder 50: Sale of slave by H[enry] Johnson to Bennett Moore, and subsequently, by Moore to Asa Norton, 1811 March 15, April 11

Documents signed. In English.

Henry Johnson, Opelousas, sold to Bennett Moore, Lexington, Kentucky, a black male named Harry, about twenty-five years old, for $600. Moore on 1811 April 11 transferred the certificate of purchase to Asa Norton.

Folder 51: Receipt issued by Salvador Pamias, Pointe Coupée, to Jean Baptiste Beauvais, 1811 March 20

Document signed. In French.

Pamias acknowledged having received the sum of 271 piastres from Beauvais.

Folder 52: Act of sale of property, a transaction between Adelaide Raguet and Pierre Degruy, fils, in New Orleans, 1811 March 21

Document. Notarized copy, dated 1834 May 7, signed by Felix Grima. In French.

Before Notary Public John Lynd, New Orleans appeared demoiselle Adelaide Raguet [or, Raguette], f.w.c., who sold to Pierre Degruy, Jr., for 2,000 piastres, a property situated about two leagues downstream from New Orleans on the west bank of the Mississippi. The vendor had purchased the land from François Munhall.

Folder 53: Sale of slave by Bennett Moore to Asa Norton, both of the County of Attakapas, 1811 April 13

Document signed. Countersigned: Barnet Hulick, Jesse Woodhull, witnesses. In English.

Moore sold Norton a black mule named Harry, about twenty-five years old, for $550.

Folder 54: Certificate of service of Lieutenant Ursino Bouligny, 1811 April 29

Document. Signed: Benígno García Calderón. In Spanish.

Benígno García Calderón, assistant in charge of the Sergeant Major's office of the Infantry Regiment of Louisiana now stationed in Pensacola, certified the service record of Lieutenant Ursino Bouligny, age thirty-two, who had served in Louisiana from his enrollment as a cadet in November 1790 until the end of December 1810. The Lieutenant was in broken health.

Folder 55: Certificate of service of Ensign Luis Bouligny, 1811 May 1

Document. Signed: Benígno García Calderón. In Spanish.

Benígno García Calderón, assistant in charge of the Sergeant Major's office of the Infantry Regiment of Louisiana now stationed in Pensacola, certified the service record of Ensign Luis Bouligny, age twenty, who had served in Louisiana from his enrollment as cadet in1793 September until 1804 March, and who had voluntarily joined the crew of the frigate Luisiana in 1797 May and June. Bouligny was in delicate health.

Folder 56: Land patent to property claimed by Bastian Olivas in the County of Ouachita, 1811 May 21

Document. Certified copy, dated 1849 February 10, signed by M. McIntire, Register, Land Office, Opelousa. In English.

The Commissioners of the Western District, Orleans Territory, confirmed the claim of Bastion Olivas [or Bastien Olivot] to 400 square arpents situated in the County of Ouachita on the left bank of the Ouachita River and bounded on the upper side by land in the public domain and on the other by property of F. La Boeuf. The claim rested on an order of survey issued by Governor Gayoso de Lemos in 1797 in favor of John Brochay.

Folder 57: Acts of sale of slaves owned by Doctor Edward Duffel, Ascension Parish, 1811 July 12-1829 February 2

Documents. Certified copies, dated 1834 July 14, written and signed by Edward Duffel, Parish Judge, Ascension Parish. In English.

Duffel made copies of six acts of sale by which he purchased his slaves Maria, Frank, Billy, Aimé, Malvina, her child Stephen, and Nathaniel between 1811 and 1829. Duffel indicated where each document was registered.

Folder 58: Land patent to property claimed by Jacques Fontenelle in the County of Attakapas, 1811 August 22

Document. Certified copy, dated 1832 August 31 signed by Valentine King, Register, Land Office, Opelousas. In English.

The Commissioners of the Western District, Orleans Territory, confirmed the claim of Jacques Fontenelle to 480 square arpents situated in the County of Attakapas on the east bank of Bayou Teche and bounded on both sides by land of Louis Judice. Claim to the land rested on an order of survey issued by Governor Carondelet in 1795 in favor of the claimant.

Folder 59: Sale of slave by Jean Baptiste Beauvais, agent for Madame de Lisa in Pointe Coupée, to Julie Ozenne, widow Macarty, 1811 September 3

Document. Signed: Bte Beauvais; Poiret, Antne. Beauvais, and Ad. Beauvais, witnesses. In French.

Jean Baptiste Beauvais, acting for Marie Françoise Moro, wife of Joaquin Joseph de Lisa, sold to Julie Ozenne, widow Macarty, for 700 piastres, a slave named Honoré. [This item is filed with the document to which it is attached, Mme de Lisa's appointment of Beauvais as her agent, 1811 February 13.]

This is in Box 7, Folder 49.

Folder 60: Sale of slave by Lucius Smith to Asa Norton, both of the Parish of Saint Mary, 1811 October 5

Document signed. Countersigned: Saml. Cook, Thomas Gardner, witnesses. In English.

Smith sold to Norton a black male named Moses, age thirty-five, for $450.

Folder 61: Land patent to property claimed by Jean Charles Hebert in the County of Attakapas, 1811 December 6

Document. Certified copy, dated 1829 December 26, signed by Valentine King, Register, Land Office, Opelousas. In English.

The Commissioners of the Western District, Orleans Territory, confirmed the claim of Jean Charles Hebert to 400 square arpents situated in the County of Attakapas on Bayou Vermilion. The claim rested on the possession and occupancy of the land by Joseph Guedry and by the claimant for twelve consecutive years prior to 1803.

Folder 62: Act of sale of property, a transaction between Louis Bouligny, New Orleans, and Daniel Clark, New Orleans, 1812 January 11

Document. Notarized copy, dated 1814 April 30, signed Pierre Pedesclaux. In French.

Before Notary Pedesclaux appeared Louis Bouligny, who declared that he had sold to Daniel Clark several tracts of land situated in Ouachita Parish. The agreement made provisions for payment of an indemnity of 20,000 piastres to Clark in the event of reclamations against him.

Folder 63: Land title issued to [name torn] by Levin Wailes and Gideon Fritz, Commissioners, Orleans Territory, 1812 January 24

Document signed. Left half of document missing. In English.

The document referred to a land claim based on a survey order of 1796 August 26 issued by the Baron de Carondelet. The land was situated on Bayou Tortue with a depth to Bayou Cypress.

Folder 64: Procès-verbal of the taking of inventory of the estate of the late Jacques Roman, Saint James Parish, 1812 February 3-5

Document. Certified, excerpted copy, dated 1834 May 9, signed by L.M. Taney, Judge, Saint James Parish. In French.

The estate of Jacques Roman consisted of a plantation situated in Saint James Parish, sixteen leagues above New Orleans on the right bank of the Mississippi. On 1812 February 3 the testamentary executors, Agricole Fuselier and Jean Soulié, in the presence of Roman's widow, Louise Patin, and his heirs, undertook to make an inventory and evaluation of the estate.

The present document excerpts from the complete procès-verbal the inventory of the eighty-four slaves on the plantation. There were additional data given about each person, besides the usual name, age, and value. If the slave was not born in America (créole de l'Amérique), the African nation of origin was given. The entries also differentiated between black and mulatto, indicated any illnesses or physical defects, and listed the jobs the person was trained to do. Children were listed with their mothers and each child's name, age, and color were given.

Folder 65: Procès-verbal of public auction of properties belonging to Salvador Panias, Pointe Coupée Parish, 1812 February 27

<span style="font-size: 11.9999990463257px;">Digital surrogates for this item can be found here: http://cdm16313.contentdm.oclc.org:80/cdm/ref/collection/p16313coll51/id/2532.</span>

Document. Certified copy, dated 1836 April 26, signed by A. Robin, Judge, Pointe Coupée Parish. In French.

On the petition of Salvador Panias [or, Pamias], Judge John Henry Ludeling, Pointe Coupée Parish, conducted a public sale of property belonging to Panias. Daniel, a male slave, fourteen years old, was sold to a free mulatto [name not given] for 570 piastres. A residential property was sold to the widow Découx for 8,000 piastres. At this point Panias asked the Judge to close the sale.

Folder 66: Land patent to property claimed by Edward Murphy, deceased, in the County of Natchitoches, 1812 June 15

Document. Certified copy, dated 1836 September 26, signed by John J. Taylor, Register, Land Office, Opelousas. In English.

The Commissioners of the Western District, Orleans Territory, confirmed title to the claim of the representatives of Edward Murphy, deceased, to 203 square arpents situated in the County of Natchitoches on both sides of the Red River at a place called the Desert. The claim rested on the occupancy and cultivation of the land by John Varangue prior to 1803 and on the conveyance of title to Murphy in 1793.

Folder 67: Land patent to the property claimed by Edward Murphy, deceased, in the County of Natchitoches, 1812 June 15

Document. Certified copy, dated 1836 September 26, signed by John J. Taylor, Register, Land Office, Opelousas. In English.

The Commissioners of the Western District, Orleans Territory, confirmed title to the claim of the representatives of Edward Murphy, deceased, to sixty-four acres situated in the County of Natchitoches on both sides of the Red River about 1 1/4 leagues from the post. The claim rested on occupancy and cultivation by Remy Poisset prior to 1803 and on conveyance of title by Poisset's heirs to Murphy in 1806.

Folder 68: Land patent to property claimed by Edward Murphy, deceased, in the County of Natchitoches, 1812 June 15

Document. Certified copy, dated 1836 September 26, signed by John J. Taylor, Register, Land Office, Opelousas. In English.

The Commissioners of the Western District, Orleans Territory, confirmed title to the claim of the representative of Edward Murphy, deceased, to 115 acres situated in the County of Natchitoches near the post on the left bank of the Red River. The claim rested on a Spanish land grant to Etienne Verger and proof of occupancy prior to 1800.

Folder 69: Land patent to property claimed by Edward Murphy, deceased, in the County of Natchitoches, 1812 June 16

Document. Certified copy, dated 1836 September 25, signed by John J. Taylor, Register, Land Office, Opelousas. In English.

The Commissioners of the Western District, Orleans Territory, confirmed title to the claim of the representatives of Edward Murphy, deceased, to seventy-three square arpents situated in the County of Natchitoches on the right bank of the Red River, 1 1/2 leagues from the post. The claim rested on the Spanish land grant made to Charles Lemoine in 1787.

Folder 70: Land patent to property claimed by Edward Murphy, deceased, in the County of Natchitoches, 1812 June 16

Document. Certified copy, dated 1836 September 26, signed by John J. Taylor, Register, land Office, Opelousas. In English.

The Commissioners of the Western District, Orleans Territory, confirmed title to the claim of the representatives of Edward Murphy, deceased to 105 acres situated in the County of Natchitoches on the left bank of the Red River, 1 1/4 leagues from the post. The claim rested on a Spanish land grant to Charles Lemoine.

Folder 71: Report made by [Captain John Ballinger], New Orleans, to General James Wilkinson, [New Orleans], 1812 November 3

Document. Unsigned draft [in Ballinger's hand]. In English.

[In 1812 June the United States had declared war on Great Britain, and in July of that year General James Wilkinson arrived in New Orleans to take command of the Seventh Military District, which was comprised of Tennessee, Louisiana, and the Mississippi Territory. As protection against the menace of British naval power in the Gulf, he ordered a reconnaissance of the area west of the mouth of the Mississippi and the construction of a new post at La Balize. Ballinger's mission to Barataria, about which he reported in the document summarized below, may not have been strictly for strategic purposes, however, for on 1812 October 12 Governor Claiborne wrote to Wilkinson that the Acting Collector of Revenue of the District had informed him of "a serious opposition to the Revenue Laws, by an armed Banditti on the Lake Barataria. The Collector, " Claiborne continued," requests Military aid in enforcing the Laws,...and suggests the expediency of your placing the armed force under the Command of Captain Ballenger [sic], who has received a Special Commission as Inspector of the Revenue." (Rowland, Claiborne Letterbooks, VI, 189-190).]

Captain John Ballinger, having reconnoitered the passes of Barataria and Lafourche, submitted his report to General Wilkinson. With respect to Barataria, vessels not drawing more than three feet of water could come within two leagues of New Orleans. The erection of a fort at a site that he called "Temple" would effectively protect against enemy attack. On Bayou Lafourche, which does not connect with Barataria, the most suitable site for a fort would probably be at the fork, where a small detachment of artillery with three six-or nine-pounders could guard the area. Additionally, "the Creole volunteers would perhaps be the best troops for the Lafourche," he said, "as I consider It a very unhealthy situation."

Folder 72: Letter to the editor submitted by [John Ballenger], [La] Balize, to an unnamed newspaper, 1812 November 23

Letter. Unsigned, incomplete draft [in Ballenger's hand]. In English.

[Captain John Ballinger of Kentucky had emigrated to Spanish West Florida shortly before the English-speaking residents of the area revolted and declared their independence from Spain on 1810 September 26. He was a member of the Convention of West Florida, which had been the governing body of the territory until its formal annexation by the United States. In the latter part of 1811 Ballinger had been in Washington as a lobbyist representing the interests of the former Convention. This letter to the editor relates to his activities in Washington and was written to refute statements concerning him that were made in letters, published earlier, the first an anonymous piece signed "A Floridian" and the second written by Eligius Fromentin. The cataloguer was unable to find copies of any of the letters in the extant newspapers of the period.]

[For more complete biographical data on Ballinger see: J.A. Padgett, editor, "The West Florida Revolution of 1810," LHQ, XXI, 93, fn. 63. Concerning his career in Washington see: I.J. Cox, The West Florida Controversy, 598-604. Eligius Fromentin, a Louisiana politician, was elected Secretary of the State Senate in 1812 November and was subsequently elected United States Senator on 1813 January 11. Regarding George Mathews, mentioned below, see: Cox, West Florida Controversy, 310 ff; Ibid., "...George Mathews," MVHR, XII, 309-333.]

An anonymous writer, calling himself, "A Floridian," Ballinger wrote, had made certain charges in print against the official conduct of Eligius Fromentin. The writer had cited Ballinger as an authority for proof of the accusation that a memorial to Congress submitted [by certain citizens of West Florida?]  had been "studiously withheld untill [sic] the law of admission had passed." Ballinger stated that he had left Washington before the passage of the act of admission [1812 April] and that he had "had reason to believe the memorial was presented before that time." Now, since, Fromentin, rather than seeking Ballinger's disavowal of the anonymous remarks, had made a public explanation of his mission to Washington, Ballinger felt compelled to give his own version.

The primary goal of his mission had been to obtain government recognition of West Florida as part of the Louisiana purchase and to secure its annexation to the state that would be formed out of the Territory of Orleans. As his credentials and the Orleans delegation did not arrive in Washington until several weeks after he had gotten there, he was not in a strong position to press his case. Meanwhile, [George] Poindexter [representative of the Mississippi Territory], had promoted the annexation of West Florida to Mississippi and had circulated a petition signed by a number of [West Florida?] residents in support of this move. Although the admission committee had given a favorable report to Poindexter's proposal, Congress had not voted on the measure. Ballinger had made known the position of those he represented to President Madison through Secretary of State Monroe. Subsequently, he had been told by a confidential informant that [General George] Mathews was negotiating with the Spanish commandant at Pensacola, [Vicente Folch], for the surrender of the remaining Spanish posts along the coast, and that Mathews was authorized to hold all of West Florida [from the Mississippi River to the Perdido River] subject to future negotiations with Spain. The lack of journals or other evidence on hand prevented his disproving statements made by Fromentin regarding the favorable committee report on Poindexter's annexation plan.

[The draft ends here in mid-sentence.]

Folder 73: Registration of the testament and codicils of Pierre Louis de Milleville in Dieppe, 1813 March 20

Document. Unnotarized contemporary copy. In French.

Before Imperial Notary Antoine Pierre Boisseau in Dieppe, and in response to an order of the Judge of the Dieppe Tribunal, Jacques Jean Herrier filed and registered the testament of Pierre Louis de Milleville, dated 1809 September 1, and two codicils (1810 September 3;1812 February 20). Copies of the will and codicils are appended.

Folder 74: Registration of the testament of Pierre Louis de Milleville in Dieppe, 1813 March 24

Document. Unnotarized contemporary copy. In French.

Before Antoine Pierre Boisseau, Imperial Notary in Dieppe, and at the order of Jean Baptiste Viallet Desgranges, Judge of the Court of the First Instance, M. Benigne Neveu filed and registered a copy of the testament of Pierre Louis de Milleville, which was dated 1812 February 20. The entire text of the will is given in the document.

Folder 75: Procès-verbaux in the settlement of the succession of Grégoire Melançon, Iberville Parish, 1813 May 17-September 25

Documents. Certified copies, dated 1832 September 19, signed by John Dutton, Judge of the Parish of Iberville. In English.

The documents relate to the settlement of the estate of the deceased Grégoire Melançon. At the request of Marie Christine Landry, Melançon's widow and tutor to their eight minor children, an inventory and evaluation of the estate were made on 1813 May 17. Included in the inventory were a plantation with five arpents frontage on the Mississippi, tools, household goods, livestock, and a male slave Jack, age about twenty. There were also debts. On 1813 May 18, at a family meeting, the heirs decided to sell part of the land and the slave. At public auction held on June 21, Marie Christine Landry bought a section of two arpents frontage, and Joseph T. Rils purchased Jack for $695. At a subsequent sale on September 25, Melançon's widow bought the remainder of the land. There is a final statement of accounts at the end.

Folder 76: Official letter from [Major John Ballinger], [La] Balize, to Colonel [William] MacRea, [New Orleans], 1813 May 31

Letter . Unsigned contemporary copy [in Ballinger's hand]. In English.

[Colonel William MacRea was one of the United States Army commanders in New Orleans. Ballinger had been promoted to Major on 1813 March 3.]

Ballinger explained that when he took command of La Balize post on April 12 he had received no ordnance list from the previous commander, Captain [James B.] Many, who claimed that he had received none from the officer he had relieved, Captain [Francis] Newman. Ballinger apologized for the errors in the ordinance reports that he had submitted on April 14. On account of his own ignorance of the ordnance department, he had had to rely on the tallies furnished him by Many, whom he had put in charge of supplies. Although he had questioned the correctness of the forms, he had had to accept Many's assurances in this matter. Since receipt of MacRea's letter he had personally conducted an item-by-item inventory of all supplies and was enclosing a summary thereof. Included on the list were forty or fifty damaged muskets for whose condition he was not accountable, as they had been like this since Newman's command.

Folder 77: Official letter from Major John Ballinger, [la] Balize, to Colonel [William] MacRea, [New Orleans], 1813 June 11

Autograph letter signed. In English.

Ballinger gave an account of a jolly boat and five passengers in distress, who were found by one of the river pilots. The latter had brought the men and vessel into La Balize. The leader was John Waykman, a Swedish seamen, who had come to the United States three years before. After having made several voyages, he had set sail last February 2 on the merchant brig John, bound from New York to Saint Bartholomew [Saint-Barthélmy or Saint Barts]. The British frigate Surprise captured the ship and took the crew as prisoners to Guadeloupe. On May 11, Waykman and several other prisoners, mostly North Americans, agreed to attempt to seize the British schooner Loon and to make a run out of the harbor. They were successful and steered for La Balize. On May 31 they were in the latitude but, being short of water and provisions, the crew agreed to send Waykman and four others in the ship's jolly boat to find supplies. Ballinger gave the names and origins of the men who accompanied Waykman. All remained under Ballinger's charge, and he awaited orders respecting them.

Folder 78: Official letter from [Major John Ballinger], [La] Balize, to Colonel [William] MacRea, [New Orleans], 1813 June 11

Letter. Unsigned, incomplete draft [in Ballinger's hand]. In English.

Ballinger had received MacRea's order of the 3rd, which informed him that he had been relieved of his his command of La Balize post and ordered him to proceed to Tennessee. He was preparing to leave and would start out on Monday [the 14th]. MacRea's letter of the 9th, however, appeared to imply that he should remain in La Balize and await further orders. Since the instructions to stay were not clearly indicated, he asked for clarification. He would prefer that he and his men be allowed to remain at the post at least until the paymaster came. They had three month's pay due them and would otherwise be unable to settle their accounts or collect debts owed them before departure.

Concerning the arrest of [Captain John?] Miller, he had ordered this to be done to prevent a breakdown of discipline, as all the officers at the post, most particularly [Philogène] Favrot, had openly expressed their hostility towards Miller. Captain [James B.] Many was of the opinion that Miller should have arrested Favrot or dueled with him when the latter insulted him on the parade ground. [Favrot gave a different account of his quarrel with Miller in his diary. See: The Favrot Papers, XI, 50, 52-55.]

Folder 79: Act of sale of property by Henry Daingerfield of Natchez, and by Anne Thurston and Alfred and Edmond Thurston of Saint Martin Parish, widow and sons of the late Charles M. Thurston, to Ignace Delino [de Chalmet], 1813 June 14

Document. Notarized copy, dated 1832 September 22, signed by Felix de Armas. In French. Addenda in English.

Before Notary Public Michel de Armas in New Orleans, Daingerfield and the Thurstons sold to Ignace Delino de Chalmet for 65,000 piastres a plantation situated 1 1/2 leagues below New Orleans on the left bank of the Mississippi River. The vendors had acquired the land from the United States government the same year for 44,000 piastres. An explanation of the schedule of payments and mortgages follows. Addenda are copies of documents by which Anne Thurston had granted power of attorney to Nathan Morse to represent her in the transaction.

Folder 80: Marriage contract between St. Julien de Tournillon and Mary Brown Jones, Parish of East Baton Rouge, 1813 September 23

Document. Notarized copy, dated 1832 July 23, signed by Ch. Tessier. In English.

Before Charles Tessier, Notary Public in the Parish of East Baton Rouge, appeared St. Julien de Tournillon and Mary Brown, who were to be married. Tournillon stated that he was a native of Lyons and the legitimate son of St. Julien Tournillon and [H]yacinthe Reynault. Mary Brown said she was a native of Dublin, the daughter of Clement Brown and Catharine Byerne, and the widow of P. Livingston Jones. The couple mutually agreed to be united in marriage under certain conditions, enumerated in the document, governing the property and monies that each possessed prior to the ceremony.

Folder 81: Receipt issued by Louis Le Faux, publisher of the Moniteur de la Louisiane, New Orleans, to John McDonogh, 1814 January 25

Document signed. In French.

Le Faux acknowledged receipt of four piastres from John McDonogh for a subscription of six months to the Moniteur de la Louisiane.

Folder 82: Sale of slave by David Lejeune to the Corporation of the City of New Orleans, 1814 March 2

Document. Certified contemporary copy signed by N[icolas] Girod, Mayor. In French.

Pierre Laurens and J.B. Plauché, on behalf of David Lejeune of Bayou Sara, appeared before the Mayor and City Council of New Orleans and, according to a prior agreement, they sold to the City, for 60 piastres 12 1/2 cents, a male slave named Bartelet, age about forty, who belonged to Lejeune. The slave was a runaway, in poor health, who had been in the police jail for some time. The purchase price was equal to the sum Lejeune owed the City for expenses in his capture and detainment.

Folder 83: Map of the site of the Battle of New Orleans, 1814 December 23-1815 January 8

Manuscript. Unsigned. In French.

This map, roughly drawn in brown ink, shows the area along the Mississippi River from the Macarty plantation to the Jumonville property and up to the mouth of Bayou Bienvenu at Lake Borgne.

Folder 84: List of subscribers to raise money for clothing for General Jackson's troops, [New Orleans], 1814 December 30-1815 January 16

Document. Signed: Louailier aîné. In French.

Messrs. Fortier, Soulié, and Louaillier, Sr., were in charge of raising funds to purchase the woolen clothing desperately needed by the men in Major General Jackson's army. The present subscription was for the purpose of providing 234 coats, jackets, and pants. There followed a list of subscribers, the amount each pledged, and notations of payments made.

Folder 85: Official letter from Lieutenant M. Dupart, no place, to General David Morgan, no place, 1815 January 3

Autograph letter signed. In French.

Lieutenant Dupart of the Guard Corps requested permission of General Morgan to draw provisions from Fort Saint-Léon, as he was almost out.

Folder 86: List of subscribers to raise money for clothing for General Jackson's troops, New Orleans, 1815 January 16

Document. Signed: A. Longer Secretaire. In French.

Messrs. Fortier, Soulié, and Louaillier, Sr., were in charge of raising funds to purchase the woolen clothing desperately needed by the men in Major General Jackson's army. On this subscription list were pledges received and collected by Richard Relf.

Folder 87: List of subscribers to raise money for clothing for General Jackson's troops, New Orleans, 1815 January 18

Document. Signed: A. Longer Trésorier. In French.

The subscription list was of pledges received and collected by Captain J.B. Gilly from the Company of Veterans of the First District. Gilly collected $139, which he turned over to the Treasurer of the subscription fund.

Folder 88: Letter from J. Henry Lüdeling, Pointe Coupée, to Messrs. Soulié, Fortier and Louaillier, New Orleans, 1815 April 4

Autograph letter signed. In French.

Lüdeling regretted to learn that Soulié, Fortier, and Louallier had had little success with their subscription to raise funds to provide clothing for the militia. Lüdeling, at first, received good promises, but subsequently the matter caused him such problems that he sent the subscription list to Sosthène Allain, a militia officer who admitted that he had had no luck at all in securing pledges.

Folder 89: "Claims reported by Commissioners:" A decision rendered in regard to claims to land purchased from Indians prior to the transfer of Louisiana, 1815 April 6

Document. Uncertified, undated [1826?] copy of a certified copy, dated 1826 January 27, signed by Valentine King, Register, Land Office, Opelousas. In English.

The Board of Commissioners of the Land Office at Opelousas, after considering the claim of Pierre Arceneaux, reported its findings and rendered a decision. At the same time it set forth guidelines for similar cases.

Arceneaux's claim was to a third portion of land on Coulé d'Aigle that Frederick Monton [Mouton?] had purchased on 1802 July 29 for $115 from Achenoya, Chief of the Attakapas Indians. As proof, Arceneaux presented copies of two acts of sale. The Commissioners noted that since the claimant submitted no evidence to establish ownership by occupancy, the claim rested on validity of the Indian title. Thus, they asserted, "It may not be improper here to enquire whether and how far this case and other similarly circumstanced may be affected by the laws of the United States restraining the purchasing of lands of Indians by unauthorized individuals."

The Commissioners reviewed the United States laws governing trade and intercourse with Indians. These prohibited the transfer of title of Indian lands except by treaty negotiated by an authorized government official but, until the establishment of the territorial governments in 1804 October, the laws of Spain were in force. The Board proceeded to make a lengthy examination of Spanish laws and their application. The Commissioners perceived four distinct classes of purchases of land from Indians and minutely analyzed each.

In the fourth category were lands purchased from non-Christian Indians, who did not occupy them at the date of sale, and which transactions had not been ratified by any Governor of Louisiana. These titles, in the opinion of the Commissioners, ought not to be conferred, "unless accompanied by some equitable circumstances in their favor." The Board concluded, "Of this last class is the claim at present under consideration, unattended by any circumstances known to the Board of Commissioners, which might entitle it to confirmation." [Published in American State Papers Public Lands, V, 736-739.]

Folder 90: Sale of slave by Victor Bruslé to S. and Z. Roman, all residents of Saint James Parish, 1815 April 15

Document. Certified contemporary copy signed by A[lexan]dre Chapdu, Justice of the Peace, Saint James Parish. In French.

Before Justice of the Peace Chapdu appeared Victor Bruslé, who declared that he had sold to S. and Z. Roman for 400 piastres a male slave, age about twenty, "de Nation Anglaise."

Folder 91: Petition submitted by Charles Labedoyere Kernion, a minor, to the Honorable James Pitot, Judge of Probate Court, New Orleans, 1815 October 9

Document. Certified contemporary copy signed by Chatry, Justice of the Peace, New Orleans. In French.

Charles Labedoyere Kernion, eighteen years old, son of René Huchet de Kernion and Marie Modeste Deverges, both deceased, wished to obtain a letter of emancipation so that he might administer his own affairs. He asked Judge Pitot to call, in accordance with the law, an assembly of his relatives to discuss his petition. A notation on the back, signed by Pitot, and dated October 11, reads, "Let a meeting of the family of the Petitioner be called...to give their opinion."

Folder 92: Bond of Emily Ozenne Bridges, widow of Patrick McDermott, guaranteed by Messrs. Barrow, Fort, Ratliff, and Adams, Feliciana Parish, 1815 October 23

Document. Signed: "her X mark;" John Mud, witness. In English.

Emily Ozenne, widow of Patrick McDermott and subsequently the wife of William Bridges, appeared before John Mud, Deputy Sheriff of Feliciana Parish to present security for the faithful discharge of her duties as executrix of the estate of her deceased husband and tutrix of their minor children. Guarantors were William Barrow, Frederick Fort, William Ratliff, and Elijah Adams.

Folder 93: Declaration of William Bridges and his wife Emily Ozenne Bridges, Feliciana Parish, regarding the settlement of the estate of the latter's deceased husband, Patrick McDermott, 1815 November 11

Document. Certified copy, dated 1815 November 11, signed by John H. Johnson, Parish Judge, Feliciana Parish. In English.

William Bridges and his wife Emily Ozenne, widow of Patrick McDermott, appeared before Judge Johnson and acknowledged under oath that they received from Jean Baptiste Beauvais, executor of the estate of the deceased, all sums due them.

Folder 94: Receipt issued by W[illiam] Jinkens, Tax Collector, [Parish of Lafourche Interior], to John Guillote, 1815

Autograph document signed. In English.

In 1815 Guillote [or, Guillot] paid taxes in the amount of $6.63 for land he owned on Bayou [Lafourche] and for his slaves.

Box 8: National period, 1816-1825
Folder 1: Sale of slave from the estate of Grégoire LeBlanc to Edward Duffel, Ascension Parish, 1816 February 13

Document. Certified excerpted copy, dated 1834 July 14, of certified copy dated 1831 July 29, both signed by Edward Duffel, Judge, Ascension Parish. In French and English.

The document is an extract from the proceedings of the public sale of the community property of Grégoire LeBlanc, sold by order of the Court of Probate of Ascension Parish on 1816 February 13. Duffel bought an African female named Julie, age twenty-five, for 755 piastres.

Folder 2: Bill issued by the Collège de Saint-Thomas for the incidental expenses of the student Pierre Beauvais, 1816 May 16

Document. Signed: "Reçu le contenu / Wilson." In French.

Archibald Williams of the Collège de Saint-Thomas, submitted an itemized bill in the amount of $204.46 for board, uniforms, books, and incidental expenses of Pierre Beauvais. Wilson marked the bill paid.

Folder 3: Certificate issued by Judge P[aul] Briant, Saint Martin Parish, to Jean Baptiste Beauvais, 1816 August 1

Autograph document signed. In French.

Judge Paul Briant certified that he had recorded in the registry of livestock brands of Saint Martin Parish two brands (drawn of the left side of the sheet) that belonged to Jean Baptiste Beauvais.

Folder 4: Exchange of property, a transaction between Pierre Degruy, fils, and Eugène Carlin, both of Faubourg de la Couse, New Orleans, 1816 October 3

Document. Notarized copy, dated 1834 April 29, signed by Felix de Armas. In French.

Before Notary Public Michel de Armas, New Orleans, appeared Pierre Degruy, Jr., and Eugène Carlin to conduct a mutual exchange of properties. Degruy transferred to Carlin a property situated about two leagues downstream from New Orleans on the west bank of the Mississippi. Carlin gave Degruy a lot in the Faubourg de la Couse, situated between Constance and Richard Streets, that he had acquired from Adelaïde Allary, f.w.c. In addition, Carlin agreed to pay Degruy 200 piastres within a year.

Folder 5: Land claim decision rendered by the Land Office, Eastern District of Louisiana, in the claim of Hubert Bellanger, 1816 November 20

Document. Certified copy, dated 1835 February 26, signed by B.Z. Canonge, Land Office, New Orleans. In English.

Hubert Bellanger claimed a tract of land of 663 acres on Bayou Terrebonne and presented proof that he had occupied the land prior to 1803. The Commissioners ruled that a claimant was not entitled to more than 640 acres and confirmed Bellanger's title only for that amount.

Folder 6: Receipt issued by M. DeKlegand, no place, to [Jean Baptiste] Beauvais, no place, 1817 February 17

Autograph document signed. In French.

M. DeKlegand acknowledged having received from Beauvais the sum of thirty-eight piastres to pay for the board of the latter's daughter.

Folder 7: Act of sale of property, a transaction between François Dupuis and Eugène Carlin, both of New Orleans, 1817 February 17

Document. Notarized copy, dated 1834 April 29, signed by Felix de Armas. In French.

Before Notary Public Michel de Armas, New Orleans, appeared François Dupuis [or, Dupuy], who sold to Eugène Carlin, for 630 piastres cash, a tract of land situated about two leagues downriver from New Orleans on the west bank of the Mississippi. Dupuis had acquired the land from Louis Séguin and Bernard Goux.

Folder 8: Sale of slave from the estate of the wife of Louis Picote Belestre, Saint Landry Parish, to Thomas Gardner, 1818 March 13

Document. Certified excerpted copy, dated 1832 June 25, signed by George King, Judge, Saint Landry Parish. In English.

The document is an extract from the proceedings of the sale of the community property of Louis Picote Belestre and his deceased wife on 1818 March 13 in Saint Landry Parish. Thomas Gardner purchased a male child named Alexander, age seven, for $770.

Folder 9: Procès-verbal of auction of community property belonging jointly to François Jacques Ozenne and his deceased wife Marguerite Decuir, Saint Martin Parish, 1818 April 15-16

Document. Certified copy, dated 1818 November 5, signed by P[aul] Briant, Judge, Saint Martin Parish.

The community property holdings of François Jacques Ozenne and his deceased wife Marguerite Decuir, which were sold at auction before Judge Paul Briant, Saint Martin Parish, included a plantation on Bayou Tortu, a property near l'Ile du Large, household goods, livestock, and sixteen adult slaves. The document gives the age and describes the physical condition of each slave. Witnesses to the sale where Louis Chemin and Godefroy Decuir. A list of names of the persons present at the auction helps to clarify the interrelationships between the Ozenne, Decuir, and Beauvais families of Saint Martin Parish.

Folder 10: Personal letter from Sister Antonía de Santa Moníca, Mother superior, Santa Ursula Monastery, [in Spain], to Luis Bouligny, 1818 August 6

Autograph letter signed. In Spanish.

Sister Antonía was happy to see Luis Bouligny and to hear about his family. She had received a letter from Bouligny's mother, requesting her to introduce Luis to the Marquesa de Arcos. For this purpose Sister Antonía enclosed a letter of introduction that Bouligny could present to the Marquesa.

Folder 11: Check issued by John McDonogh, New Orleans, to Messrs. Montgomery and Stringer, 1818 August 18

Document signed. In English.

McDonogh authorized the Bank of Orleans to pay Montgomery and Stringer $132.

Folder 12: Receipt issued by James L. Johnson, [Saint Martin Parish], to [Jean Baptiste] Beauvais, 1818 December 16

Autograph document signed. In English.

Johnson acknowledged having received $10 from Beauvais for the survey of the lot that the latter bought from the estate of François Jacques Ozenne.

Folder 13: Certificate issued by Governor James Villeré of Louisiana to Narcissus Broutin, 1818 December 26

Document signed. In English.

Governor Villeré certified that Narcissus Broutin was a Notary Public in New Orleans at the time the attached document, [which is missing], was signed.

Folder 14: Inventory of property conducted by Narcissus Broutin, New Orleans, 1819 January 29

Document signed. Incomplete contemporary copy. In French.

The document is the final page of an inventory of an estate or a property, conducted by Notary Public Narcissus Broutin, New Orleans, before Mr. Desbois, an interested party, and two witnesses.

Folder 15: Certificate issued by [Jean Armand] Fr[ançois] Gulillermin, French Consul in New Orleans, 1819 February 18

Document signed. In French.

French Consul Guillermin certified the authenticity of the signature of Governor James Villeré on the document on the obverse side of the sheet. [This document is filed with the certificate issued by Governor Villeré o Narcissus Broutin, 1818 December 23.]

This item is in Box 8, Folder 13.

Folder 16: Certificate issued by Governor James Villeré  of Louisiana to Narcissus Broutin, 1819 February 18

Document signed. In English.

Governor Villeré certified that Narcissus Broutin was a Notary Public in New Orleans at the time the attached document, [dated 1819 January 29], was signed. [This item is attached to and filled with the aforementioned document, an Inventory conducted by Broutin.]

This item is in Box 8, Folder 14.

Folder 17: Certificate issued by [Jean Amand] Fr[ançois] Guillermin, French Consul in New Orleans, 1819 February 18

Document signed. In French.

French Consul Guillermin certified that authenticity of Governor James Villeré on the document on the obverse side of the sheet. [This item is attached to and filed with an Inventory conducted by Narcissus Broutin, 1819 January 29.]

This item is in Box 8, Folder 14.

Folder 18: Receipt issued by Antonio Diaz, Parish of Lafourche Interior, to Jean Guillot, 1819 June 29

Autograph document signed. In French.

Diaz received from Guillot 470 gourdes as second payment on a black family Guillot had bought from him at public auction.

Folder 19: Sketches of [Fort Saint Ferdinand], New Orleans, 1819 July 10

Ink drawings with unsigned explanation. In French.

Two drawings show the dimensions of Fort Saint Ferdinand and its layout in relation to blocks and streets in 1819. On the back of one of the plans, the unidentified artist wrote that he found stumps of the colonial fortification on 1819 July 10, when the drainage canal for St. Ann, Orleans and Saint Peter Streets was being dug at the site of the Old Fort Saint Ferdinand. He made his discovery in the presence of Messrs. Peralta, Moore, E. Wiltz, Chauvin, and Moreau. A picket was found planted at the flanked angle of the bastion, and upon examination determined that the palisade had been composed of posts six inches by six inches.

Folder 20: Sketches of the foundations of Fort Saint Charles, New Orleans, 1819 November 8

Ink drawings of the foundations of Fort Saint Charles, New Orleans.

Four rough drawings show the ground plan and dimensions of Fort Saint Charles. There is also an elevation showing the general placement of the palisade.

Folder 21: Procès-verbal of the public sale of the estate of Jacques François Ozenne, Saint Martin Parish, 1819 November 15

Document. Certified copy, dated 1820 November 24, signed by P[aul] Briant, Judge, Saint Martin Parish. In French.

The estate of Jacques François Ozenne was sold at public auction at the request of his heirs - Edmond Ozenne; Ursin Ozenne; Jean Baptiste Beauvais, representing his wife Bridget; Louis Gary, representing the widow L'Abbé; and Charles Mayer, acting for Pouponne Ozenne La Barthe. Included in the sale were personal items, books, furniture, and three slaves. The buyers' names and purchase prices were given.

Folder 22: Act of sale of property, a translation between the agents for the estate of François Cousin and Jean Baptiste Labatut, New Orleans, 1820 February 16

Document. Notarized contemporary copy, signed by Michel de Armas. In French.

Before Notary Public Michel de Armas, New Orleans, appeared François Alpuente, acting for Térence Carrière, a resident of Saint Tammany Parish and testamentary executor of the estate of the deceased François Cousin. Alpuente declared that by virtue of the sale at auction on February 3, he sold from the estate of the deceased Cousin to Jean Baptiste Labatut, for 3,500 piastres, a piece of ground situated on Rampart Street in New Orleans.

Folder 23: Statement of accounts for the partition of the proceeds from the Ozenne estate among the heirs, [Saint Martin Parish], circa 1820 April

Document. Undated, unsigned. In French.

The accounting is of the proceeds from the estate of François Jacques Ozenne and his wife Marguerite Decuir.

Folder 24: Land claim decision rendered by the Land Office, Saint Helena Parish, to the claim of John Rhea, 1820 June 1

Document. Certified copy, dated 1826 October 21, signed by H.T. Williams, Surveyor General of Louisiana. In English.

The Land Commissioner recognized as valid the claim made by John Rhea to 1,015 square arpents in East Baton Rouge Parish. Rhea's claim was based on a Spanish grant made in 1789 to J.M. de la Barba.

Folder 25: Power of attorney and instructions given by J[ea]n B[aptis]te Labatut to Francis A. Blanc, both of New Orleans, 1820 August 21

Autograph document signed. In French.

New Orleans merchant Jean Baptiste Labatut, prior to his departure on a trip to France, gave his business associate Francis A. Blanc power of attorney and a detailed set of instructions. The instructions indicated how Blanc was to pay bills, collect promissory notes and other debts, disburse dividends received from the Banque de la Louisiane stock, receive shipments of dry goods and foodstuffs, handle personal and other business matters, and keep books of accounting.

Folder 26: Receipt issued by Father Gab[riel] Isabey, Attakapas, to Jean Baptiste Beauvais [St. Martinsville], 1820 December 31

Autograph document signed. In French.

Father Gabriel Isabey acknowledged having received from Jean Baptiste Beauvais the sum of one hundred piastres, which represented the bequest left him by the deceased François Jacques Ozenne.

Folder 27: Bill submitted by [Jo?] Lacy, no place, to Mr. Claverie, circa 1820

Autograph document signed. In French.

Lacy, a tailor, submitted a bill for several articles of clothing that he made or restyled for Claverie.

Folder 28: Personal letter from A[rnaud Beauvais], [Pointe Coupée], to Jean Baptiste Beauvais, Saint Martinville, 1821 October

Autograph letter. Signature and day torn. In French.

Arnaud Beauvais reported on a number of business and family matters that he had been handling for his brother Jean Baptiste Beauvais.

Folder 29: Business letter from Cr. Anthoine, Saint Martinville, to Jean Baptiste Beauvais, Saint Martinville, 1821 November 28

Autograph letter signed. In French.

Cr. Anthoine informed Jean Baptiste Beauvais that the Dauterive heirs, in order to reach a common accord about what position to take in a suit over certain lands that Beauvais had in his possession, planned to meet formally at the parish courthouse next Saturday at 10 A.M. Beauvais should not neglect to attend this session, which was of urgent importance to his interests.

Folder 30: Law school notebook of Joshua Baker, Litchfield [Connecticut], entitled "Bailment and Evidence", 1821-1822

Bound manuscript. In English.

Baker wrote these notes at the Litchfield [Law School]. Approximately one-third of the volume is devoted to notes on the subject of bailment and the other two thirds to evidence.

Folder 31: Personal letter from Delisle de la Barthe, Bayou Saint John, to Edmond Ozenne, Saint Martinville, 1822 July 14

Autograph letter signed. In French.

Delisle de la Barthe [or, Labarthe Delisle] lugubriously related the financial difficulties and health problems that he and his wife, Ozenne's sister, had been having. Since his deal with Julien Poydras had fallen through, he had been forced to turn over his property to his creditors. He wished to start a small business in order to earn a living and requested Ozenne to send the money due him. Also, his wife was coheir to a succession in litigation. So that he might claim her share of the estate, de la Barthe asked Ozenne to send the documents necessary for proof.

Folder 32: Act of sale of property, a transaction between Hubert Bellanger and Henry S. Thibodaux, both of Terrebonne Parish, 1822 July 24

Document. Undated certified copy, signed by L. Barras, Judge, Terrebonne Parish. In English.

Before Judge Francis M. Guyol of Terrebonne Parish appeared Bellanger, who sold to Thibodeaux a tract of land containing 640 arpents, situated on Bayou Terrebonne. At the same time Thibodaux transferred to Bellanger title to a lot with one arpent frontage on Bayou Terrebonne, a part of the larger tract that Thibodaux had purchased from Pierre Bergeron.

Folder 33: Statement of accounts of money owed by Jean Baptiste Beauvais, [Saint Martinville], to Arnaud Beauvais, no place, 1822 September 2

Document. Signed: Ad Beauvais. In French.

Above the signature of Arnaud Beauvais appears the notation, in his hand, "pour acquit / le 19 avril 1823."

Folder 34: Act of sale of property, a transaction between Madame Alix Bienvenu, widow of Barthélemi Duverjé, and Isidore Roche, both of New Orleans, 1822 September 2

Document. Notarized copy, dated 1832 September 10, signed by Wm. Christy. In French.

Before Notary Public Hugues Lavergne, New Orleans, appeared Mme Alix Bienvenu, widow of Barthélemi Duverjé, who sold to Isidore Roche, for 5,000 piastres, a property situated about two leagues downstream from New Orleans on the right bank of the Mississippi. The tract was bounded by lands of Pierre LaCoste and Antoine Lespare.

Folder 35: Petition submitted by Labarthe Delisle, Saint Mary Parish, to Paul Briant, Judge of Saint Martin Parish and ex officio Judge of Probate, after 1822

Document. Signed: John Brownson, Attorney for Petitioner. In English.

Labarthe Delisle [or Delisle de la Barthe], resident of New Orleans but living in Saint Mary Parish, declared that he was the husband of the deceased Pouponne Ozenne and the father and natural tutor of their three minor children. Delisle contended that his children were entitled to one-eighth part of the estate of Jacques François Ozenne and his wife Marguerite Decuir, both deceased. He therefore petitioned Judge Paul Briant to include his claim in making final partition among the heirs.

Folder 36: Petition submitted by Larbathe Delisle, Saint Mary Parish, to Paul Briant, Judge of Saint Martin Parish and ex officio Judge of Probate, after 1822

Document. Undated, unnotarized contemporary copy. In English.

This is a copy of the preceding document.

Folder 37: Declaration of Jean Baptiste Beauvais et al, in Saint Martin Parish, regarding claims against the estate of Labarthe Delisle, 1823 April 28

Document. Signed: Ed. Ozenne, Us. Ozenne, Bte. Beauvais, Antne Beauvais. In English.

Jean Baptiste Beauvais, Antoine Beavais, Edmond Ozenne, and Ursin Ozenne acknowledged that they had in their possession a number of slave children, who belonged to Labarthe Delisle and who had been surrendered by him to his creditors in Saint Tammany Parish. The signers declared that they would deliver the slaves when called upon to do so by Delisle's syndics, Elijah Clark and Samuel James.

Folder 38: Act of sale of property, a transaction between Isidore Roche and Messrs. Casimir Lacoste and Antoine Marcelin Ducros, of Saint Bernard Parish, 1823 may 12

Document. Notarized copy, dated 1832 August 30, signed by Jh. Cuvillier. In French.

Before Notary Public Hugues Lavergne, New Orleans, appeared Isidore Roche, who sold to Messrs. Casimir Lacoste of Saint Bernard Parish and Antoine Marcelin Ducros of New Orleans for 8,240 piastres a property in Orleans Parish situated about two leagues downstream from the city on the right bank of the Mississippi. The lot was bounded by lands owned by the purchasers and by Antoine Lespare. There was an account of current liens against the property and a schedule of payments.

Folder 39: Personal letter from Arnaud Beauvais, Pointe Coupée, to Jean Baptiste Beauvais, Saint Martinville, 1823 June 4

Autograph letter signed. In French.

Arnaud Beavais wrote to his brother Jean Baptiste to recount local and family news. He had heard from New Orleans that there had been increasing number of bankruptcies, resulting in unrecoverable losses. He himself had not suffered any loss. The Morgan levee had caved in, and it had not been possible to prevent the rupture from growing.

Folder 40: Statement of accounts of money owed by Jean Baptiste Beauvais to the succession of Father Gabriel Isabey, Saint-Martin des Attakapas, 1823 August 16

Document. Signed: Rd Darros, receiving payment for François Marc. In French.

Beauvais received the accounting of $31 he owed the succession of Father Isabey. The debt was for the burial of several family members and slaves in 1822. Beauvais made payment to Raymond Darros on 1823 August 16.

Folder 41: Succession agreement entered into by the heirs of the deceased Mary Brown, wife of St. Julien de Tournillon, Assumption Parish, 1823 December 31

Document. Certified copy, dated 1832 July 16, signed by Bela Hubbard, Judge, Assumption Parish. In French.

The heirs of Mary Brown, who died on 1822 April 26 in Assumption Parish were Nicholas P. Trist and H.B. Trist, sons from a previous marriage, and St. Julien de Tournillon and Marie Louise de Tournillon, children from her later marriage. Her estate consisted of a plantation in East Baton Rouge Parish, thirty-two slaves, books, dishes, and furniture. The document gives the details of the agreement of the heirs for partition of the estate. Names and prices of individual slaves also appear.

Folder 42: Procès-verbal of public auction of properties of the deceased widow of Pierre Découx and a sale to Valery Découx and Désolives Découx, Pointe Coupée Parish, 1824 February 16

Document. Certified, excerpted copy, dated 1836 April 28, signed by A. Robin, Judge, Pointe Coupée Parish. In English.

Peter Dormenon, Judge, Pointe Coupée Parish, and ex officio Judge of the Court of Probate, attested that in accordance with the decision reached at the family meeting held on 1824 January 16 by the heirs of the deceased Marie Paren, widow of Pierre Découx, he proceeded with the sale of the movable and immovable property of the estate. Among the properties sold was a tract of land in Pointe Coupée with six arpents frontage on the Mississippi and bounded on one side by land belonging to Hippolyte Découx and on the other side by that of Modeste [Blanquet], f.w.c. The land was bought by Valery Découx and Désolives Découx, jointly, for $3,000. Salvador Pamias, who had previously enjoyed the right to pass through the tract to cut firewood in the swamps on the property, retained the privilege after the sale.

Folder 43: Official letter from Jean Baptiste Broussard, Saint Martin Parish, to Jean Baptiste Beauvais, [Saint Martinville], 1824 March 15

Autograph letter signed. In French.

Jean Baptiste Broussard, chanter of the parish church of Saint-Martin des Attakapas, wrote to Jean Baptiste Beauvais, warden of the same church. He stated that he had held his position for many years and had performed his duties faithfully at masses and other services for which he had received little compensation. Because the church was poor, he had relinquished his claim to $60 due him in fees. In return the parish priest, Father Gabriel Isabey, had promised to assign him a pew, which normally rented at $20 per year, in lieu of paying an annual salary. Since Father Isabey had died, Broussard now requested Beauvais to approve the arrangement.

Folder 44: Act of Congress of the United States regarding land claim decisions in the Louisiana Territory, 1824 May 26

Document. Uncertified [1844?] copy. In English.

The title of legislation was "Act enabling the claimants of lands within the the limits of the State of Missouri and Territory of Arkansas to institute proceedings to try the validity of their claims." Those who had legally received French or Spanish concessions prior to 1804 March 10 could file a petition with the District Court of Missouri to substantiate the claim. The law outlined procedures and requirements for receiving titles. [The heirs of Jean Antoine Bernard Dauterive based their claim to Vermilion Prairie on this Act and on a subsequent one passed by Congress 1844 June 17.]

Folder 45: Act of Congress of the United States regarding land claims in the Louisiana Territory, 1824 May 26

Document. Uncertified [1844?] copy. In French.

This is a French translation of the preceding entry.

Folder 46: Personal letter from Augustus Guibert, Bayou Sara, to his father-in-law, [Jean Baptiste Beauvais, Saint Martinville], 1824 July 8

Autograph letter signed. In French.

Augustus Guibert recounted local and family news to his father-in-law. The family had been ill with fever, but all were well now. He had not been able to get the widow Bridges to sign the document in favor of the Delisle children, as she had been too sick to receive. The cotton and corn crops promised to be bountiful. One of his male slaves had been killed by lightning when he took refuge under a tree during a thunderstorm.

Folder 47: Succession agreement entered into by Emil Ozenne Bridges, West Feliciana Parish, 1824 November 19

Document. Signed: "Sa marque X ordinaire." Countersigned: H. Baines, Agus Guibert, witnesses. In French.

Emily Ozenne Bridges, as coheir of her deceased father, agreed to relinquish her legitimate claim to the slave family of Prudence and her six children of Labarthe Delisle. Title to the slaves had been transferred to the deceased in prejudice of the interests of the Delisle children.

Folder 48: Procès-verbal of the sale of community property belonging to the estate of Joseph Hebert and his widow Adelaïde Allain, Iberville Parish, 1825 January 11

Document. Certified excerpted copy, dated 1834 June 13, signed by John Dutton, Judge, Iberville Parish. In English and French.

This extract is a record of the sale of three young slaves to Joseph Henry, a minor with rights of majority, who was assisted by Joseph Capdeviele, his curator. The slaves were adolescents, two males, age twelve and fourteen, and a female, age eighteen, with her child of two months.

Folder 49: Personal letter from Nathalie Beauvais, [Pointe Coupée], to Jean Baptiste Beauvais, [Saint Martinville], 1825 February 21

Autograph letter signed. In French.

Nathalie Beauvais wrote to her father Jean Baptiste Beauvais with the news of the family. She had left New Orleans on the 18th and was presently spending time with her uncle Arnaud Beauvais and his wife. She looked forward to seeing her father next month.

Folder 50: Personal letter from C.M. Conrad, New Orleans, to Elizabeth Conrad, New Iberia, 1825 March 27

Autograph letter signed. In English.

Conrad wrote his sister Elizabeth in a humorous vein of the exaggerated anticipation shown by the people of New Orleans to the forthcoming visit of the Marquis de Lafayette. He described public plans, real and imaginary, to celebrate the hero's presence.

Folder 51: Receipt issued by Julie Ozenne, widow Macarty, Attakapas, to Jean Baptiste Beauvais, [Saint Martinvile], 1825 June 22

Document. Signed: "Marque ordnaire X." In French.

Julie Ozenne, widow Macarty, acknowledged that she had received 350 piastres from Beauvais, which sum represented her share of the estate of the deceased Joseph Decuir.

Folder 52: Act of sale of property, a transaction between Désolive Descoux and Charles Poydras, both of Pointe Coupée, 1825 July 19

Document. Certified copy, dated 1836 April 26, signed by A. Robin, Judge, Pointe Coupée Parish. In French.

Before Judge Peter Dormenon, Point Coupée Parish, appeared Désolive [ or, Désolives] Descoux, who sold to Charles Poydras for 1,500 piastres a property in Point Coupée Parish, situated on the Mississippi and bounded by lands of Modeste Blaquet, f.w.c., and Ernest Bauduin. Descoux had obtained the land from Bauduin.

Folder 53: Act of sale of property, a transaction between Ernest Bauduin and his wife, vendors, and Charles Poydras, buyer, all of Pointe Coupée Parish, 1825 August 22

Document. Certified copy, dated 1836 April 26, signed by A. Robin, Judge, Pointe Coupée Parish. In French.

Before Judge Peter Dormenon, Pointe Coupée Parish, appeared Ernest Bauduin [or, Baduin] and his wife Augustine Décuirs, who sold to Charles Poydras for 500 piastres a property in Pointe Coupée Parish that was bounded by land Poydras had recently bought from Désolives Descoux and by that of the vendors themselves.

Folder 54: Personal letter from Adelina Laurans, Paris, to Jean Baptiste Beauvais, Attakapas, 1825 September 21

Autograph letter signed. In French.

Adelina Laurans related family news to her godfather Jean Baptiste Beauvais. She inquired about the family in Louisiana and gently chided Beauvais for not writing.

Folder 55: Personal letter from Arnaud Beauvais, Pointe Coupée, to Jean Baptiste Beauvais, Attakapas, 1825 October 23

Autograph letter signed. In French.

Arnaud Beauvais wrote his brother Jean Baptiste Beauvais news of the family. He had hoped to see him at the end of the month, but work was behind schedule on account of sickness among the slaves.

Box 9: National period, 1826-1843
Folder 1: Plat and surveyor's certificate for land to be divided among the heirs of Priscilla Howell, East Feliciana Parish, 1826 May 11

Document. Signed: A.B. Graham, Parish Surveyor, East Feliciana Parish. In English.

Surveyor Graham certified that he had surveyed a tract of land of 1,359 acres fronting on Redwood Creek and divided the same into four equal sections. The land, originally granted by patent to William Kirkland, was the property of the heirs of Priscilla Howell - William J. and Samuel J. Llewellyn, and Elizabeth M. and Frances P. Howell - each of whom would receive one of the lots, as indicated on the accompanying plat.

Folder 2: Statement of accounts of money owed by Jean Baptiste Beauvais to the Church of Saint Martin, Saint Martinville, 1826 June 10

Autograph document. Signed: A. Dumartrait, church warden and treasurer. In French.

Beauvais had been church warden and treasurer of the Church of Saint Martin for some time. A. Dumartrait, with the help of the parish priest and other members of the congregation, audited Beauvais' records. They concluded that he owed money and submitted this itemized statement for 309 piastres.

Folder 3: Personal letter from François Beauvais, Attakapas, to Charles Olivier, no place, 1826 July 16

Autograph letter signed. In French.

Beauvais wrote in response to a letter Olivier had written the Beauvais family, on behalf of Labarthe Delisle, with the request that Delisle be allowed to see his children. Beauvais, as guardian of Delisle's daughter, stated that the father could visit the child at any time so long as he conducted himself in a proper manner. Delisle's son was the ward of [Jean Baptiste Beauvais], the writer's father, who was willing to relinquish the boy into Delisle's authority upon request.

Folder 4: Personal letter from Madame B. Laurans, [Nantes?], to J[ean Baptiste] Beauvais, Saint Martinville, 1827 January 23

Autograph letter signed. In French.

The salutation reads "Mon chere frere." Mme Laurans informed Beauvais that her daughter Adéline [or, Adelina] would be married on February 6 to Auguste Garnier, rich merchant from [Nantes?], who was of good family. She expressed warm feelings for her brother and the wish to see him again before she died. There is a postscript written by Adéline Laurans, who sent embraces to her uncle, aunt, and cousins.

Folder 5: Act of emancipation by François Camus, New Orleans, of his female slave Souris, 1827 October 26

Digital surrogates for items in this folder can be found here: http://cdm16313.contentdm.oclc.org:80/cdm/ref/collection/p16313coll51/id/11977.

Document. Certified copy, dated 1827 October 27, signed by Antonio Ducros, register of Conveyances, New Orleans. In English.

By an act passed before Notary Public Hugh K. Gordon, François Camus certified that he had freed his female slave named Souris, age thirty-two years.

Folder 6: Succession agreement entered into by Brigitte Bellanger, widow of Henry Schuyler Thibodaux's other heirs, Terrebonne Parish, 1827 December 6

Document. Undated certified copy, signed by L. Barras, Judge, Terrebonne Parish. In English.

Before Probate Judge S.G. Moore appeared: Brigette Bellanger, widow of Henry Schuyler Thibodaux, acting for herself and her two minor children; other relatives and heirs of Thibodaux (names listed); the following manner: 1) the widow would receive all property belonging to the deceased at the value set by the court; 2) the widow could collect and keep any debts owed to the succession; 3) the widow had to pay all debts owed by the succession within four years, and after that period she was obligated to pay each of the heirs a pro rata share of the estate; 4) losses or gains in the value of the succession would be shared equally by heirs.

Folder 7: Deed to land seized from Eugène Carlin by the Sheriff of Orleans Parish and sold at public auction to John Louis Rabassa, 1828 February 18

Document. Certified copy, dated 1833 April 29, signed by P. LeBlanc, Clerk, First Judicial District Court. In English.

Sheriff George W. Morgan certified that upon receipt of writs of fieri facias that resulted from suits instituted against Eugène Carlin by James W. Reynolds and by Fort and Clement, he seized a property owned by Carlin situated on the right bank of the Mississippi downstream from New Orleans. At a public auction held on 1826 September 12, John Louis Rabassa bought the land for $3,400 cash.

Folder 8: Act of sale of property, a transaction between Jean Louis Rabassa and Messrs. Ducros and Lacoste, all of Orleans Parish, 1828 February 26

Document. Notarized copy, dated 1832 August 20, signed by A. Mazureau. In French.

Before Notary Public John Nicholson Duncan, New Orleans, appeared Jean Louis Rabassa, who sold to Antonio Marcelin Ducros and Casimir Lacoste, for 4,300 piastres, a tract of land situated in Orleans Parish on the right bank of the Mississippi about two leagues downriver from New Orleans. The lot was bounded by property owned by the buyers.

Folder 9: Summons issued by the District Court, Saint Martin Parish, to Suzette Ozenne, 1828 March 21

Document. Signed: W.B. Eastin, Clerk of Court, Saint Martin Parish. In French and English.

Suzette Ozenne, daughter of the deceased Marguerite Descuirs [or, Decuir], was ordered to appear in the District Court, Saint Martin Parish, and comply with the demand contained in the petition of the heirs of Charlotte Julie Labbé, a copy of which was attached. The heirs of the deceased Labbé had brought suit against her husband Jean Pierre Descuirs.

Folder 10: Power attorney given by Antoine Bordeaux, New Orleans, to Victor Souza, New Orleans, 1828 May 1

Document. Notarized copy, dated 1834 December 26, signed by Félix de Armas. In French.

Antoine Bordeaux before Notary Public Félix de Armas granted power of attorney to Victor Souza, his son-in-law, to administer all his affairs while Bordeaux was to be in France. Souza was empowered to emancipate the slave Jeanne, age twenty-two, and her four children, ages nine months, and seven, five, and three years.

Folder 11: Personal letter from Madame B. Laurans, [Paris?], to J[ean Baptiste] Beauvais, Attakapas, 1828 August 11

Autograph letter signed. In French.

Mme Laurans was happy to have received a letter from her brother Jean Baptiste Beauvais. She repeated some of the family news recounted by her brother and expressed a desire to see her relatives in Louisiana once again. She wrote about her daughter Adelina, now married, and about her grandchildren.

Folder 12: Account book of Joseph Girod, New Orleans, 1828 November-1855 September

Bound manuscript. In French.

The volume, marked "Journal De L'Habitation" [Household Accounts], was a book of original entry for records of personal and business finances, which were, according to notations, later posted in other journals. There were also accounts relating to a sugar plantation that Girod [owned?] in [Saint Charles Parish?]. The latter included records of money paid to hired laborers and memoranda regarding work done by slaves on the property, cords of wood that he had bought from them, and money that they owed him. In addition there were separate entries of accounts with various individuals.

Folder 13: Official letter from William H. Cobb, United States Surveyor, Donaldsonville, to D[avid] Urquhart, [New Orleans], 1830 March 24

Autograph letter signed. In English.

Cobb wrote that while conducting a survey on orders of the Surveyor General, he came across a tract in Orleans County that Urquhart claimed. Urquhart's claim of thirty-four arpents extended in depth to Lake Barataria, but Cobb had not been able to see the original titles. A portion of the land had been confirmed to Charlotte Dreux. That portion which was not confirmed would be shown on the township map as being vacant and would be sold at public auction. A note in another handwriting indicates that the letter was subsequently transmitted to Louis Bouligny.

Folder 14: Official note from President [Andrew Jackson], no place, to Secretary of State [Martin Van Buren], no place, 1830 June 1

Autograph note. Unsigned. In English.

The note is written in the third person. The President inquired whether [Ambrose Hundley] Sevier, [territorial delegate to Congress from Arkansas], had named a commissioner "to run the line between Louisiana and Arkansas." He should make the appointment now in order to allow sufficient time to prepare a report for the next Congress.

Folder 15: Statement of accounts rendered by Father Marcel Borella, parish priest of the Church of Saint Martin, [Saint Martinville], to Jean Baptiste Beauvais, 1830 July 15

Autograph document signed. In French.

Father Borella submitted an itemized bill for money Beauvais owed to the Church of Saint Martin and a record of payments received from Beauvais. The accounting listed charges for burial of Beauvais' wife Suzanne Ozenne, for burial of two of his slaves, for construction of a tomb, and for miscellaneous expenditures.

Folder 16: Personal letter from an anonymous writer to President Andrew Jackson, Washington City, 1830, before August 18

Autograph letter. Signed: "annonymous." Superscription: "The letter was recd. and opened / by me this morning - it came / thro' the city Post Office. / Wednesday August 18th. 1830. WB Lewis." In English.

[William B. Lewis was a member of Jackson's Cabinet.] The writer warned the President of false friends close to him, who were plotting his assassination. They would urge him to run for a second term in 1832 so as to use his popularity for their personal gain. "You are to live til [sic] by holding you up as a candidate excitement gets to its highest pitch, than [sic] suddenly some of your now pretended warm friends are to put a veto on your existence, and after a false show of great mourning come out in your place--."

Folder 17: Drawing of an area between the Mississippi River and Lake Pontchartrain, showing water levels during a flood, circa 1830?

Map. Hand drawn; ink with color wash. In French.

The map is drawn on a long strip of tracing paper. Situated near the river are the Avart and Hampton properties. Canal Macarty and Bayou Metairie are also shown. Near the lake is the property of Alexander Milne. The water levels range in depth from eight feet four inches near Bayou Metairie to thirteen feet two inches near and in Lake Pontchartrain.

This item can be found in the Collection 600 Oversize Area, Drawer 1.

Folder 18: Synopsis of the titles for a property owned by Gilbert Arnandez, no place, circa 1830?

Document. In English.

The plan and synopsis of titles were of a tract that Gilbert Arnandez proposed to mortgage as security for stock in the Citizens' Bank of Louisiana. The land, purchased from Xavier Rivet, was situated on the Mississippi and was bounded by properties of Auguste Levert and Louis Rivet.

Folder 19: Personal letter from Arnaud Beauvais, Pointe Coupée, to Jean Baptiste Beauvais, Saint Martinville, 1831 March 28

Autograph letter signed. In French.

Arnaud Beauvais had not heard from his brother Jean Baptiste Beauvais and feared that he might be ill. Coralie, whose husband was buried Saturday, was in town with her children. From Mme Decuir he had learned that Mme Laurans had been bedridden for two months. The family sent regards.

Folder 20: Order by the Mayoralty of New Orleans to the jail warden on behalf of [John?] McDonogh, 1831 April 15

Document. Signed: Dennis Prieur [not Mayor Prieur's signature]. In French.

The warden was to return to the custody of McDonogh his slave Robert, age twenty-seven, upon receipt of payment of charges.

Folder 21: Personal letter from Arnaud Beauvais, Pointe Coupée, to Jean Baptiste Beauvais, Saint Martinville, 1831 October 13

Autograph letter signed. In French.

Arnaud Beauvais was happy to receive a letter from his brother Jean Baptiste Beauvais and to learn that the family was well. Arnaud's wife had been quite sick for a while. Mme Lyman was staying with them and sent greetings. He conveyed news from the Guiberts and from family in Paris, all of whom were well.

Folder 22: United States House bill H.R. 407, 1832 February 23

Broadside. In English.

In the 1st Session of the 22nd Congress "Mr. Bullard from the Committee on Private Land Claims, reported...A bill for the relief of John L. Lobdell." The bill would confirm his title to a tract of land covering 700 square arpents opposite Brown's Island in West Baton Rouge Parish. This was the same tract granted to Stephen Watts by the Spanish government in 1798.

Folder 23: Renunciation of community property rights by Sophie Coman, wife of Hubert Bellanger, Terrebonne Parish, 1832 August 30

Document. Undated certified copy, signed by L. Barras, Judge, Terrebonne Parish. In French.

Before Justice of the Peace Evariste Porche, Terrebonne Parish, Sophie Comau [Coman?], wife of Hubert Bellanger, declared that in 1822 her husband had sold to Henry S. Thibodaux a piece of land situated about four miles from Bayou Lafourche. The tract now belonged to Leufroy Barras and his wife Emilie Thibodaux. In order to permit them to obtain a clear title, Mrs. Bellanger renounced her community property rights to the land her husband had sold.

Folder 24: Land claim decision rendered by the Board of Commissioners of the Eastern District of Louisiana to the petition of William Brown, before 1832 October 17

Document. Certified copy, dated 1832 October 17, signed by Hilary B. Cenas, Register. In English.

William Brown claimed land on the east bank of the Mississippi River in Orleans Parish, sixteen arpents, extending in depth to Lake Borgne. The land was abounded above by that of J.M. Pintard and below by that of Chalmet Delino. The Board confirmed the river frontage but rejected the claim to the remaining extension of depth.

Folder 25: Business letter from James H. Caldwell, New Orleans, to P. Benson, no place, 1832 December 12

Autograph letter signed. In English.

Caldwell asked Benson to apply the enclosed check to pay a note in the amount of $303.64 that Caldwell had due in Benson's bank on January 3.

Folder 26: Report made by Richard F. Cadle, Superintendent, Protestant Episcopal Mission, Green Bay, Wisconsin, to Colonel George Boyd, in charge of Indian Affairs, Green Bay, 1833 January 17

Autograph letter signed. In English.

Superintendent Cadle reported that there were 120 boarding students at the Protestant Episcopal Mission School for Indian Children at Green Bay. He gave a breakdown by tribe of the children and included statistics regarding literacy and subjects studied.

Folder 27: Personal letter from Arnaud Beauvais, New Orleans, to Jean Baptiste Beauvais, Saint Martinville, 1833 February 4

Autograph letter signed. In French.

On account of illness Arnaud Beauvais had not been able to send his brother Jean Baptiste Beauvais the latter's marriage contract as requested. He believed the terms of the agreement were not what Jean Baptiste believed them to be. Louis Chenevert had resigned his seat in the Louisiana Senate, and Arnaud had been named to take his place. In regard to the [Augustus?] Guibert succession, it was necessary that the estate be sold on account of the confusion in which the deceased left his affairs.

Folder 28: Land claim decision rendered by the Land Office, South Eastern District of Louisiana, in the claim of Antonio Marcelin Ducros and Casimir Lacoste, 1833 September 5

Document. Certified copy, dated 1834 June 4, signed by Hilary B. Cenas, Register, land Office, New Orleans. In English.

Ducros and Lacoste claimed 800 square arpents situated in Orleans Parish on the west bank of the Mississippi River. Claim to the land was based on purchase and on possession by the claimants for more than forty years. The Commissioners accepted the proof and confirmed title.

Folder 29: Plan and filiation of title to the residence of Messrs. Ducros and Lacoste, 1833 September 5

Undated map, crudely drawn by hand. In French.

See document dated 1833 September 5: Land claim decision...in the claim of Antonio Marcelin Ducros and Casimir Lacoste (Folder 28).

Folder 30: Ratification and approval by Henry Claiborne Thibodaux and Bannon Goforth Thibodaux of the Thibodaux family agreement of 1827 December 6, Terrebonne Parish, 1834 March 19

Document. Certified copy dated 1835 January 28, signed by L. Barras, Judge, Terrebonne Parish. In French.

Before Judge Leufroy Barras appeared Henry Claiborne Thibodaux and his brother Bannon Goforth Thibodaux, who declared that they were in accord with the agreement entered into by their mother and the family for the settlement of the father's estate and approved all the actions taken in their name by their mother during their minority. They acknowledged that they had received, from their mother, an accounting of affairs during her tutorship and had received their share of the estate.

Folder 31: Certificate of evaluation of the property of Antonio Ducros and Casimir Lacoste made by the Citizens' Bank of Louisiana, 1834 June 21

Document. Signed: F[rançoi]s Bernoudy, L[ou]is Montault, evaluators. Certified by Judge Gallien Préval, New Orleans, 1835 February 12. In French.

On behalf of the Citizens' Bank, Bernoudy and Montault made an evaluation of the land, slaves, buildings, livestock, and tools of a sugar plantation in Orleans Parish owned by Antonio Ducros and Casimir Lacoste. The document gave the gross value of production in 1831, 1832, and 1833. Also included was a list of sixty-four slaves on the plantation with the name, age, job, and value of each person.

Folder 32: Personal letter from Robert Singleton, no place, to David Crawford, no place, 1834 July 14

Autograph letter signed. In English.

Singleton wrote about a legal dispute he was having with David and Lewis English. Sheriff Wilkins had them in custody and would take them to Blakely, [Georgia?], to settle the matter.

Folder 33: Power of attorney given by André Bienvenu Roman and his niece Angélina Roman, Saint James Parish, to Valcour Aime, Saint James Parish, 1834 July 26

Document. Notarized contemporary copy signed by Th[éodo]re Seghers. In French.

Before Notary Public Théodore Seghers in New Orleans, A.B. Roman and Angélina Roman, heirs to an undivided portion of the estate of the deceased Louise Patin (his mother; her grandmother), widow of Jacques Roman, declared that they had subscribed to shares of stock in the Citizens' Bank of Louisiana and wished to give the bank as collateral a mortgage on their share of the succession. The estate consisted of two sugar plantations in Saint James Parish. One was situated eighteen leagues above New Orleans on the right bank of the Mississippi, bounded by properties of [William] Priestly and of Jean Baptiste Armant, with a labor force of eighty-eight slaves, whose names and ages were given in the document. The other was situated twenty leagues above New Orleans on the right bank, bounded by plantations of Joseph Xavier Cantrelle and of the children of Jean Baptiste Cantrelle. It had sixty-two slaves (names and ages given).

To facilitate legal proceedings in giving the Citizens' Bank the security required by its charter, A.B. Roman and Angélina Roman granted power of attorney to Valcour Aime, who was the administrator of the succession of Louise Patin Roman, to effect a mortgage in favor of the Bank on their portion of the estate. Françoise Aimée Parent, wife of A.B. Roman, appeared and gave her consent to her husband's actions.

Folder 34: Act of mortgage granted by Bernard Marigny and his wife Anne Mathilde Morales to the Citizens' Bank of New Orleans, 1834 November 10

Document. Notarized copy, dated 1834 November 12, signed by Th[éodo]re Seghers. In French.

Before Notary Public Théodore Seghers in New Orleans, Bernard Marigny and his wife declared that Marigny had subscribed to 945 shares of the capital funds stock, worth $94,500, in the Citizens' Bank of Louisiana. As security for the value of the amount subscribed the couple granted the bank a mortgage on a sugar plantation situated in Plaquemines Parish on the right bank of the Mississippi about nine leagues below New Orleans. The mortgage covered  buildings and equipment on the slave cabins, a warehouse, stables, carts, tools, and livestock. Marigny, also mortgaged the seventy-four slaves (names and ages given) who lived on the plantation. The President of the Citizens' Bank, Lucien Guillaume Hiligsberg, accepted the mortgage on behalf of the institution.

Folder 35: List of slaves on the Lacoste plantation who were mortgaged to the Citizens' Bank of Louisiana, 1834-1835

Manuscript. Unsigned. In French.

The list is divided into three sections: those slaves who were dead in 1834; those sold by Lacoste to different persons or kept for himself; and those sold to J.A. Livaudais in 1835. In each of the categories the names and ages of the slaves are given, and in some instances the occupation or special skill of the individual.

Folder 36: Will and testament of Father Marcel Borella, parish priest of the Church of Saint Martin, Saint Martinville, 1835 May 5

Document. Certified copy, dated 1836 January 27, signed by P[aul] Briant, Judge, Saint Martin Parish. In French.

Father Borella, a native of Sardinia, appointed the Bishop of New Orleans as the universal heir of all the goods he possessed in the United States and asked that the value of these be used to build and furnish a church in Saint Martin Parish. For memorial masses to be celebrated in his name, Father Borella set aside the sum of 1,000 piastres. He bequeathed legacies to his godson François Marcel Dumatrait and to "ma negresse Magdelaine." Lastly, he appointed A. Dumartrait as his executor. A note on the copy indicates that Father Borella died on 1836 January 21.

Folder 37: Sale of slaves by Hunter Murphy, of Bardstown, Kentucky, to D.H. Miller, [Natchez?], 1835 May 19

Document signed. In English.

In Natchez, Murphy sold to Miller, for $7,250, ten slaves (five men and five women), all of them field hands, who ranged in age from fifteen to thirty.

Folder 38: Act of sale of property, a transaction between Casimir Lacoste, Orleans Parish, and Hortense Lacoste, widow of Antonio Ducros, 1835 June 26

Document. Notarized copy, dated 1835 July 3, signed by Gustave Le Gardeur. In French.

In New Orleans, Casimir Lacoste appeared before Notary Public Gustave Le Gardeur to declare that, in accordance with a court order, on April 21 he had sold at public auction to Hortense Lacoste, widow of Antonio Ducros, for $30,000, the community property belonging to him and his deceased wife, Marie Nanette De La Ronde. The property consisted of an undivided half interest in a sugar plantation, situated in Orleans Parish about five leagues below New Orleans on the right bank of the Mississippi. The sale included his half share of the dwelling, sugar mill, other buildings, tools, equipment, and livestock, as well as thirty-nine slaves (names and ages given) who lived on the property. For an additional $6,000 Lacoste sold to the widow sixteen other slaves (names, ages, and individual prices given), whom he owned outright.

Folder 39: Personal letter from F[rançoi]s Girod, Paris, to his brother Joseph Girod, New Orleans, 1835 July 26

Autograph letter signed. In French.

François had found an apartment in Paris and intended to remain in the city. He had been avoiding seeing their uncle [Jean François Girod], as he did not wish to discuss the matter of the shares due from their uncle Nicolas Girod. He had instructed relatives in Savoy to search through their papers for documents that might be of use. [The writer was probably referring to a suit that certain family members were to institute in 1837 against Nicolas Girod for alleged fraud in his handling of the succession of Claude François Girod, a wealthy unmarried relative who had died in Louisiana in 1813.]

Folder 40: List of sixty-four slaves mortgaged to the Citizens' Bank of Louisiana by an unidentified person, 1835 August 1

Manuscript. Unsigned. In French.

By an act passed on 1835 August 1 the sixty-four slaves, whose names appear on the list, were mortgaged to the Citizens' Bank. [Many of the persons on the list appear to have been the slaves that the widow of Antonio Ducros purchased from Casimir Lacoste. See document dated 1835 June 26.] The names are written in ink. Penciled in by some are the notations "mort(e)" or "vendu(e)" or "Lacoste."

Folder 41: Appointment issued by Judge Charles Maurian, Court of Probates, New Orleans, delegating John D[avid] Fink tutor to three minor children of the widow Bernutz, deceased, 1835 August 5

Document signed. In English.

Judge Maurian appointed Fink tutor to Susan, John, and Frederick John Bernutz, minor children of the deceased Elizabeth Colton, widow Bernutz.

Folder 42: Appointment issued by Judge Charles Maurian, Court of Probates, New Orleans, delegating John D. Fink tutor to the minor John Henry Miller, 1835 September 22

Document signed. In English.

Judge Maurian appointed Fink tutor to John Henry Miller, minor son of the deceased Rosina Dorotea Miller.

Folder 43: Appointment issued by Judge Charles Maurian, Court of Probates, New Orleans, delegating J.W. Mueller undertutor to the minor John Henry Miller, 1835 September 22

Document signed. In English.

At the request of John D. Fink, Judge Maurian appointed J.W. Mueller under-tutor to John Henry Miller, minor son of the deceased Rosina Dorotea Miller.

Folder 44: Receipt for money paid by L. Barras, M.M. Delaporte, and the widow of H.S. Thibodaux, all of Terrebonne Parish, to purchase preemption rights to the backlands adjacent to their property, 1835 December 4

Document. Certified copy, dated 1841 March 12, signed by L. Barras, Judge, Terrebonne Parish. In English.

Maurice Cannon, Receiver of Public Moneys, Terrebonne Parish, acknowledged receipt of $471.20 from Barras, Delaporte, and the widow Thibodaux for the purchase of preemption rights to a tract of "back lands" adjacent to their front tracts. The purchase was situated in Township 15 & 16, Range 16, and covered 376.96 acres.

Folder 45: Act of sale of property, a transaction between Madame Louis Bouligny née Dauterive, New Orleans, and Edouard Livingston, New York, 1836 March 18

Document. Signed: H. Lockett; Bouligny née Dauterive [signature crossed out]; L. [Boulig]ny [last name torn]. In French.

H[enry] Lockett represented Livingston in the transaction. Mme Louis Bouligny sold to Livingston for 4,500 piastres the undivided interest in four tracts of land that she had inherited from her father, Louis Décomine Dauterive - one-fourth of a sixth portion of one lot in Iberville Parish and two in Saint Martin Parish and one-fourth of a thirty-second portion of another Saint Martin Parish.

Folder 46: Act of mortgage granted by Hortense Lacoste, widow of Antonio Ducros, Orleans Parish, to the Citizens' Bank of Louisiana, 1836 April 19

Document. Notarized copy, dated 1836 April 19, signed by Th[éodo]re Seghers. In French.

Before Notary Public Théodore Seghers in New Orleans the widow ducros declared that, by an act passed on 1836 April 14, she received from Alonzo Morphy 190 shares of capital stock in the Citizens' Bank, the value of which was $19,000. She further acknowledged that she owed the amount to the bank, and to guarantee it she gave the bank a mortgage on a sugar plantation situated in Orleans Parish, five miles below New Orleans on the right bank of the Mississippi. the mortgage covered all buildings, equipment, tools, and livestock, as well as sixty-four slaves (names and ages given), who lived on the property. The document gives a history of previous liens on the plantation.

Folder 47: Act of mortgage granted by Bernard Marigny and his wife Anne Mathilde Morales to the Citizens' Bank of Louisiana, 1836 July 5

Digital surrogates for items in this folder can be found here: http://cdm16313.contentdm.oclc.org:80/cdm/ref/collection/p16313coll51/id/2131.

Document. Notarized copy, dated 1836 July 7, signed by Th[éod]re Seghers. In French.

Before Notary Public Théodore Seghers in New Orleans, Marigny and his wife declared that, by an act passed on 1836 June 27, Marigny had acquired from Marie Louise Panis, a free woman of color, 490 shares of capital stock in the Citizens' Bank. They acknowledged that they owed on a sugar plantation situated in Plaquemines Parish, nine leagues below New Orleans on the right bank of the Mississippi. Also mortgaged as part of the property were the house, the sugar mill and ancillary buildings, an infirmary, kitchens, slave cabins, a warehouse, tools, carts, and livestock, as well as seventy slaves (names and ages given), who lived there. Edmond Jean Forstall, President of the Citizens' Bank, accepted the mortgage.

Folder 48: Partition agreement entered into by the sisters Elisabeth Howell Weston and Frances Howell Carter, forced heirs of Samuel and William Llewellyn, East Feliciana Parish, 1836 July 8

Document. Certified copy dated 1836 July 12, signed by L. Saunders, Judge, East Feliciana Parish. In English.

Before Notary Public John C. White, East Feliciana Parish, appeared Elisabeth Howell, wife of Malachi Weston, and her sister Frances Howell, wife of Albert G. Carter. The sisters gave a history of how they, together with their half brothers Samuel and William Llewellyn, now deceased, came to own property from the estates of William Kirkland, Sr. and Jr. An 1826 partition gave each of the four siblings an equal portion and since, the brothers' death, the sisters had had joint possession of the brothers' land. By the present act Elisabeth renounced all claim to the lot that formerly belonged to Samuel in favor of her sister Frances. The latter acknowledged receipt of Samuel's portion and declared that she had received her full share of the landed estates of Samuel and William Llewellyn.

Folder 49: Partition agreement entered into by Louise Rapicault, widow of John Archinard, and her five children, Rapides Parish, all parties being heirs of the deceased, 1836 September 10

Document. Certified copy, dated 1836 September 13, signed by John H. Johnston, Parish Judge, Rapides Parish. In English.

Before Matthew J. Jones, Notary Public in Rapides Parish, appeared Louise Rapicault, widow of John Archinard, and her five children, César, François, Richmind, Evariste, and Irène Archinard (the latter the wife of Henry Boyce), who declared that they owned in common, from the succession of the deceased, a plantation on Bayou Rapides, four miles above Alexandria. Mrs. Archinard made an inter vivos donation of the major part of the property, along with slaves and movables thereon, to her children. She would retain ten arpents, on which were the dwelling and other buildings, certain other movables, and thirteen household slaves. In return, each of her children would pay her an annuity of $200 and an additional sum in kind, and they would also pay the debts owed by their father's estate.

Folder 50: Declarations of members of the Archinard family, no place, 1836 November 7-12

Documents (5). Signed: C. Archinard; E. Archinard; R. Archinard; Irène Boyce née Irene Archinard; Fs. Archinard; John H. Johnston. In French.

There are five separate declarations, each signed by a different member of the Archinard family and witnessed by John H. Johnston. César, Evariste, Richmond, and François Archinard, and Irène Boyce née Irene Archinard declared under oath that they were owners of the property being mortgaged to the Citizens' Bank of Louisiana to guarantee their subscription of capital funds in that institution.

Folder 51: Record of mortgages and liens recorded in East Feliciana Parish against James Booker et al, 1837 January 4

Document. Signed: L[afayette] Saunders, Parish Judge, East Feliciana Parish. In English.

Judge Saunders certified that his records showed no mortgages existing against Hugh J. Bryan or Jesse Mayance. Against James Booker there were the following: two bonds that he posted as tutor of L.J. and Francis [sic] Jane Higginbotham and William Monroe; a mortgage in favor of the estate of Charity Palmer, deceased to secure the amount of the purchase price of the slave Nancy and her five children.

Folder 52: Act of sale of property, a transaction between Hortense Lacoste, New Orleans, and Casimir Lacoste, 1837 March 25

Document. Notarized copy, dated 1837 April 25, signed by Gustave Le Gardeur. In French.

Before Notary Public Gustave Le Gardeur in New Orleans, Hortense Lacoste, widow of Antonio Ducros and now wife of Gilbert Leonard, sold to Casimir Lacoste a sugar plantation situated in Orleans Parish, five miles below New Orleans on the right bank of the Mississippi. The sale included forty-four slaves (names and ages given), who lived on the property, sixteen other slaves (names and ages given), as well as all buildings, equipment, and livestock. Additionally, she sold 1,390 shares of capital stock that she had subscribed in the Citizens' Bank. The total price was $79,100. Since the Citizens' Bank held a mortgage on some of the property, Casimir Lacoste bound himself to assume payments and detailed arrangements are outlined. Gilbert Leonard gave approval to his wife's transaction.

Folder 53: Act of sale of property, a transaction between the heirs of Marie Louise Colette Buras and Andrew Durnford, all of Plaquemines Parish, 1837 July 12

Document. Certified copy, dated 1838 June 30, signed by G. Leonard, Judge, Plaquemines Parish. In French.

Before Judge Gilbert Leonard of Plaquemines Parish appeared Pierre Jean Pierre Buras and his eleven children as heirs of the deceased Marie Louise Colette Buras, the elder Buras' wife and the children's mother. The Buras heirs sold to Andrew Durnford for 1,200 piastres a tract of land, known as Lavacherie, situated on the right bank of the Mississippi about eighteen leagues downstream from New Orleans and adjacent to property of John McDonogh.

Folder 54: Act of sale at public auction of a property in Terrebonne Parish to Brigitte Bellanger, widow of H.S. Thibodaux, 1837 September 4

Document. Certified copy, dated 1841 March 12, signed by L. Barras, Judge. In English.

Sheriff Ruben Bush of Terrebonne Parish declared that he had seized a tract of land in the parish situated on Bayou Terrebonne, about five miles from Thibodauville, and bounded by lands of Lemuel Tanner and H.C. and H.S. Thibodaux. Bush advertised the sale of the land at a public auction to take place on 1837 September 4 and set a value of $40,000 on the tract. At the sale Brigitte Bellanger, widow of H.S. Thibodaux, purchased the property for $35,500 cash, which Bush acknowledged having received.

Folder 55: Bill issued by Thomas Golding, New Orleans, to the estate [Antoine or François] Burel, 1837 October 13

Document. Signed: A. McCarty for Golding; W.F.C. Duplessis, Register of Wills. In English.

Thomas Golding, "as keeper of the effects," submitted a bill for $53 to the estate of the deceased Burel. Register Duplessis approved payment.

Folder 56: Certificate issued by Th[oma]s J. Robins, Sheriff of East Feliciana Parish, to Stephen Yarborough, 1838 March 12

Autograph document signed. In English.

Sheriffs Robins in Clinton, Louisiana, certified that Stephen Yarborough had paid taxes due on the 1,150 acres of land and thirty-nine slaves for which he was assessed on the 1837 tax rolls and that the slaves Yarborough had mortgaged for stock in the Citizens' Bank remained in his possession.

Folder 57: Deposition of Hilary B. Cenas, New Orleans, made before United States Commissioner Thomas Wharton Collens, 1838 May 18

Document signed. In English.

Cenas made a deposition on behalf of the plaintiff in the case of Martin Pleasants and Company versus John Henderson and Company, a civil suit pending in the United States Court for the 9th Circuit District of Mississippi. Cenas had acted as notary for the former in attempting to cash a promissory note that Henderson had endorsed to Pleasants.

Folder 58: Act of sale of property, a transaction between André Durnford, Plaquemines Parish, and John McDonogh, New Orleans, 1838 July 20

Document. Notarized copy, dated 1838 August 23, signed by Louis T. Caire. In French.

Before Notary Caire, New Orleans, André [or, Andrew] Durnford, f.m.c., sold to John McDonogh for 1,200 piastres a property called Lavacherie, situated in Plaquemines Parish on the right bank of the Mississippi, about eighteen leagues downstream from New Orleans. The tract was bounded on both sides by land owned by McDonogh. Durnford received 800 piastres in cash, and the remaining 400 represented his promissory note in McDonogh's favor, which was now canceled.

Folder 59: Acceptance of mortgage created by David B. Morgan and his wife, Saint Tammany Parish on 1838 July 25, by which [General] David Bannister Morgan and his wife Mary Constance Baham, both of the same parish, created a mortgage in favor of the Citizens' Bank to secure acquisition of an additional twenty shares of capital stock valued at $2,000. The Morgans mortgaged five lots they owned on Apollon Street in Faubourg Religieuses, 1838 August 3

Document. Notarized copy, dated 1838 August 6, signed by Th[éodo]re Seghers. In English.

Before Notary Seghers, New Orleans, Edmund John Forstall, President of the Citizens' Bank of Louisiana, declared that he had taken cogniznance of an act passed before Judge Lyman Briggs of Saint Tammany Parish on 1838 July 25, by which [General] David Bannister Morgan and his wife Mary Constance Baham, both of the same parish, created a mortgage in favor of the Citizens' Bank to secure acquisition of an additional twenty shares of capital stock valued at $2,000. The Morgans mortgaged five lots they owned on Apollon Street in Faubourg Religieuses.

Folder 60: Official letter from S.R. Hobbins, First Assistant Postmaster General, Washington City, to E. Galpin, Stirling, New York, 1839 February 2

Letter signed. In English.

Hobbin, of the Post Office Department Contract Office, informed Galpin, holder of the service contract between Auburn, New York, and Stirling, that moving of the site of the latter office had reduced his route 1 1/4 miles and his compensation was therefore cut pro rata $20 per annum.

Folder 61: Record of children born to slaves R[ansom] J. Causey, [Mississippi?], 1839 February 7-1862 September 16

Manuscript. Unsigned; unidentified hand. In English.

This tiny booklet contains birth dates and names of slave children born from 1839 June 30 to 1862 September 16. The first entry, however, is a notation of a loan of $400 made by R.J. Causey to John Thompson on 1839 February 7. The last entry is a recipe for making berry syrup.

Folder 62: Sale of slave by William J. Yeatman, no place, to Edward Moore, [Iberville Parish?], 1839 February 11

Document signed. Countersigned: Alex J. Caldwell, witness. In English.

Yeatman sold Moore a male slave named Henry, about twenty years old, for $800. Moore had the document recorded in Iberville Parish on 1840 June 10.

Folder 63: Act of mortgage granted by Elijah Thompson, Amite County, Mississippi, to the Mississippi Union Bank, 1839 May 11

Document. Signed: E.M. Davis, Circuit Court Clerk, and L.R. Davis, Probate Court Clerk, Amite County. In English.

Elijah Thompson had subscribed for seventy-two shares, of $100 each, of stock of the Mississippi Union Bank. As security for the sum, he mortgaged to the Bank 414 acres of land and four slaves.

Folder 64: Land claim decision rendered by the United States Land Office in New Orleans to the petition of Walker Gilbert, before 1839 June 18

Document. Certified copy, dated 1855 March 31, signed by Louis Palms, Register. In English.

Walker Gilbert claimed by purchase from Estevan Hernandez a 670-acre tract of land situated on Bayou Terrebonne in Lafourche Parish. Hernandez's claim rested on permission, granted by Spanish officials prior to 1803 December 20, to settle on the land. The Land Office accepted Gilbert's proof of ownership, but ruled that he was entitled only to 640 acres.

Folder 65: Plat and surveyor's certificate for land confirmed to Walker Gilbert in Lafourche Parish, 1839 July 17

Document. Certified copy, dated 1855 March 31, signed by Louis Palms, Register. In English.

Nathan Webster, Deputy Surveyor, certified that on 1839 June 18 he surveyed and marked the boundaries of a 640-acre tract of land situated on Bayou Terrebonne and confirmed by the United States Land Office in the name of Walker Gilbert.

Folder 66: Postscript to business letter from A[ndrew] J[ackson]. [The Hermitage?], to Messrs. [E.H.A.?] Ewing, Attorneys at Law, Nashville, 1839

Autograph letter signed. Fragment. In English.

Andrew Jackson stated that he would resist the demands of Stockley Donelson and his wireworkers that he run a lane through his pasture and remove the gates on an existing road to facilitate access to the water on his land.

Folder 67: Business letter from H.G. Runnells, Jackson, Mississippi, to B[enjamin] L[eonard] C[ovington] Wailes, Washington, Mississippi, 1840 February 5

Autograph letter signed. In English.

H.G. Runnels acknowledged receipt of the letter reminding him of the amount due Jefferson College. The legislative session had kept him busy in Jackson, but he would attend to the matter shortly.

Folder 68: Business letter from H.G. Runnels, Jackson, Mississippi, to B[enjamin] L[eonard] C[ovington] Wailes, Washington, Mississippi, 1840 April 13

Autograph letter signed. In English.

Runnels wrote in reply to a letter from Wailes, which threatened to institute a suit against Runnels if he did not settle the account he owed Jefferson College. He gave several excuses and promised to make payment.

Folder 69: Procès-verbal of the transfer of the mortgage records of Jefferson Parish from the office of the Clerk of Court to Louis Bouligny, Recorder of Mortgages, 1840 April 13

Document. Certified copy, dated 1840 April 20, signed by J. Laizer, Justice of the Peace. In French.

At the order of Parish Judge François Dugué and in conformity with the Act of the Legislature of 1840 March 27, the mortgage records of Jefferson Parish, comprising twelve volumes, were delivered by the office of the Clerk of Court to the Recorder of Mortgages, Louis Bouligny. There followed a list and detailed description of the books transferred.

Folder 70: Official letter from Thomas E. Powell, Madison, Saint Francis County, Arkansas, to Governor Archibald Yell, Little Rock, 1841 March 27

Autograph letter signed. In English.

County Clerk Thomas E. Powell informed the Governor that several public offices in the county were vacant, and he himself was serving only as an interim appointment. Therefore, he requested that the Governor call a general election to fill the posts.

Folder 71: Receipt issued by the New Orleans Commercial Bulletin to Messrs. Canon and Dericourt, New Orleans, 1841 June 3

Document. Unsigned. In English.

The New Orleans Commercial Bulletin acknowledged receipt of $64 from Messrs. Canon and Dericourt for publishing a monition in French and English.

Folder 72: Business letter from J.F. and J. Palmer, Vicksburg, to Major W.A. Ware, [near Clinton, Mississippi], 1841 October 15

Autograph letter signed. In English.

J.F. & J. Palmer wrote Major Ware about his order for bagging and rope, which they could deliver at Clinton the next day. The firm quoted prices for different grades of bagging and rope and acknowledged receipt of twelve bales of Ware's cotton.

Folder 73: Bill issued by [J.B.] Rousseau, [New Orleans], to W. Duplessis, no place, 1842 March 26

Document signed. In French.

Rousseau, a wheelwright by trade, submitted a bill for $15.50 for various services rendered Duplessis.

Folder 74: Act of mortgage granted by James Baily Sullivan, Rapides Parish, to the Bank of Louisiana, 1843 April 29

Document. Notarized copy, dated 1843 May 27, signed by W[illia]m Christy. In English.

Before Notary Public William Christy in New Orleans, J.B. Sullivan declared that in 1832 and 1836 he had mortgaged his plantation in Rapides Parish to the Bank of Louisiana to secure loans that were now due. As additional security he, by the present act, gave the bank a mortgage on certain tracts of land adjacent to the plantation, along with all buildings, equipment, and livestock thereon. The mortgage also included forty-eight slaves, whose names and ages were given. Sullivan further agreed that if he failed to pay his obligation to the bank, it could secure a court order to seize the mortgaged property and sell it.

Folder 75: Sale of slave from the estate of the late Daniel Curd by H.P. Curd, executor, no place, to H.T. Curd, no place, 1843 August 5

Autograph document signed. In English.

H.P. Curd sold to H.T. Curd a black woman named Jude and her three children for $1,000.

Box 10: National period, 1844-1855
Folder 1: Appointment issued by Governor Alexander Mouton of Louisiana to Louis Bouligny, 1844 February 16

Document signed. In English.

Governor Mouton appointed Louis Bouligny Recorder of Mortgages for the Parish of Jefferson for the terms 1844-1846.

Folder 2: Baptismal certificate of Charles Thorton Butler, New Orleans, 1844 February 22

Digital surrogates for items in this folder can be found here: http://cdm16313.contentdm.oclc.org:80/cdm/ref/collection/p16313coll51/id/2171.

Autograph document. Signed: J. Lesne, Rector. In English.

Father James Lesne, Rector of Saint Anthony's Chapel in New Orleans, certified that he baptized Charles Thornton Butler, born 1817 May 16 at Lafourche, the legitimate son of Charles Butler, a free black man, and his wife, Rachel Butler, an Indian woman.

Folder 3: Deposition of L. Faure on behalf of Charles Thornton Butler, New Orleans, 1844 March 9

Document signed. Countersigned: William Freret, Mayor. In English.

Faure appeared before William Freret, Mayor of New Orleans, and swore that he had known Charles Thornton Butler for about eight years and that Butler had always deported himself properly.

Folder 4: Act of Congress of the United States regarding land claims in the Louisiana Territory, 1844 June 17

Document. Uncertified [contemporary?] copy. In English.

The title of the legislation was "An Act to provide for the adjustment of Land claims, within the states of Missouri, Arkansas, and Louisiana..." The new law extended the Act of 1824 May 26 for another five years. [The heirs of Jean Antoine Bernard Dauterive based their claim to Vermilion Prairie on the 1824 and 1844 Acts. This item is attached to and filed with the aforementioned 1824 Act.]

This item is in Box 8, Folder 44.

Folder 5: Act of Congress of the United States regarding land claims in the Louisiana Territory, 1844 June 17

Document. Uncertified [contemporary?] copy. In French.

This is a French translation of the preceding entry and is filed with the Act of Congress of 1824 May 26, to which it is attached.

This item is in Box 8, Folder 45.

Folder 6: Personal letter from Roger de la Chouquais, President of the Royal Court, Caen, France, to Louis Bouligny, New Orleans, 1844 October 14

Autograph letter signed. In French.

Chouquais wrote in regard to a certain concession in which the Dauterive heirs shared an interest. Upon receipt of Bouligny's power of attorney on behalf of the Dauterives, the writer could continue with the judicial proceeding. The 1772 procuration and new research should help uncover additional proofs. Chouquais had urged the Count De Montault, presently in Martinique, to have his interests represented, for the inaction of one person could jeopardize the rights of other heirs.

Folder 7: List of lands sold or confirmed in Township 11 South Range 5 East, Louisiana, 1844 December 9

Document. Certified copy, dated 1844 December 9 abstracted from the original plat, signed by P. Hebrard, Register, Land Office, Opelousas. In English.

The list gives the names of the purchasers, date of confirmation of ownership, date sold, number of acres, and section number.

Folder 8: Petition [draft?] of the heirs of [Jean Antoine] Bernard Dauterive to the Register and Receiver of the Land Office, Western District of Louisiana, for confirmation of title to Vermilion Prairie, 1844

Document. Undated, unnotarized [contemporary?] copy. In English.

The heirs of Bernard Dauterive who filed the petition were his grandchildren as follows: Jean Baptiste Dauterive, Valéry Dauterive, and Elenore Dauterive, wife of Augustin Richard, all three of Saint Martin Parish; Adeline Dauterive, widow of Jules Noël, of Iberville Parish; Théodule Dauterive, Virginie Dauterive, wife of Louis Bouligny, and Fanélie Dauterive, wife of Félix Delery, all three of Jefferson Parish; and Pauline Dauterive, wife of Samuel Logan, of Saint Charles Parish.

The petitioners, in making their request for confirmation of title to a tract of land called Vermilion Prairie, attempted to substantiate their claims by presenting proof of concessions made under the French and confirmed by the Spanish. The claimants declared that they would not disturb any persons who were already residing in this vast area and held proper, if conflicting, titles under grants from Spain or the United States.

Folder 9: Petition [draft?] of the heirs of [Jean Antoine] Bernard Dauterive to the Register and Receiver of the Land Office, Western District of Louisiana, for confirmation of title to Vermilion Prairie, 1844

Document. Undated, unnotarized [contemporary?] copy. In French.

This is a French version of the previous document.

Folder 10: Addendum [draft] to the petition [draft?] of the heirs of [Jean Antoine] Bernard Dauterive to the Register and Receiver of the Land Office, Western District of Louisiana, for confirmation of title to Vermilion Prairie, 1844

Document. Unsigned. In French.

The heirs stated that they had decided to renounce their title to the land and would accept an indemnity in any amount to be granted to them by the United States government.

Folder 11: Official notice of the suit to be filed in the United States Court in regard to the claim of the Dauterive heirs to ownership of Vermilion Prairie, 1844

Printed document. Signed: L. Bouligny, agent. In French.

This is a form with blanks for the name of the addressee. The document informed persons living in the area called Vermilion Prairie, to which the Dauterive heirs claimed title, of a suit to be filed in United States Court to confirm the family's title to the concession granted by the French in 1765. The Dauterives would then sell the property to the occupants for ten escalins an acre. The sum would be due only after Dauterive's title to the land had been validated.

Folder 12: Arguments of Louis Janin, attorney for the Dauterive heirs, [Louisiana], 1844

Documents signed. In French.

Louis Janin gave legal precedents and arguments to support the claim of the Dauterive heirs to Vermilion Prairie on the basis of a concession granted in 1765 by the French.

Folder 13: Land claim decision rendered by "Birchard (solicitor)" to Claim Number 37 of the heirs of [Jean Antoine] Bernard Dauterive [to Vermilion Prairie], circa 1844-1848

Autograph document signed. In English.

Birchard stated that he could not recommend the heirs' claim [to Vermilion Prairie] with or without proof and gave the reasons for his decision. On account of the vast extent encompassed by the alleged concession. Birchard concluded, "there would not be enough land in Louisiana to satisfy the claims of such a description."

Folder 14: Land claim decision rendered by "Mr. Birchard solicitor" to Claim Number 37 of the heirs of [Jean Antoine] Bernard Dauterive [to Vermilion Prairie], circa 1844-1848

Document. [Contemporary?] copy. In French.

This is a French translation of the preceding document.

Folder 15: Passport issued by Governor D. Leopoldo O-Donnell y Joris of Cuba to André Billan, 1845 April 8

Document. Signed: Migl. Paniagua; Adré Billa[torn]. In Spanish.

The passport, issued in the name of the Governor of Cuba, granted André Billan, a merchant, native of France, permission freely to travel from Havana to New Orleans on the United States steamer Alabama.

Folder 16: Appointment issued by Governor Alexander Mouton of Louisiana to François Bouligny, 1845 May 7

Document signed. In English.

Governor Mouton appointed François Bouligny Justice of the Peace for Jefferson Parish to serve concurrently with his term of office as Mayor of the City of Lafayette.

Folder 17: Business letter from P. Hebrard, Register, Land Office, Opelousas, to Louis Bouligny, New Orleans, 1845 September 4

Letter signed. In French.

Hebrard sent Bouligny copies of plans of five townships. These plans are the only ones in the Opelousas Land Office. Other material relative to the Dauterive claim was on deposit at the Land Office in New Orleans, by order of the commissioner. Hebrard charged Bouligny $25 for his services, which was half the usual fee.

Folder 18: Business letter from P. Hebrard, Register, Land Office, Opelousas, to Louis Bouligny, [New Orleans], 1845 September 4

Letter. Contemporary copy. In French.

This item is a copy of the previous entry.

Folder 19: Business letter from P. Hebrard, Register, Land Office, Opelousas, to Louis Bouligny, New Orleans, 1845 November 27

Letter signed. In English.

Hebrard acknowledged receipt of Bouligny's letter of the 15th inquiring whether a recent sale of public lands had not included portions encompassed by the Dauterive claim. Hebrard informed him that lots offered were situated in Township 11 South Range 6 West not East. Had the land been within the limits of the claim, he would have withheld it from sale.

Folder 20: Appointment issued by Government Issac Johnson of Louisiana to Louis Bouligny, 1846 June 23

Document signed. Countersigned: Charles Gayarré, Secretary of State. In English.

Governor Johnson appointed Louis Bouligny Recorder of mortgages for the Parish of Jefferson for the term 1846-1849.

Folder 21: Account book of the general store of Dufossard Landry in [Assumption Parish?], 1847 February- 1848 March

Bound manuscript. In French.

The account book kept by Dufossard Landry contained a record of money owed by individual customers with a running list of credit purchases and payments. Landry stocked general merchandise, such as dry goods, notions, hardware, cooking oil, coffee, and liquor.

Folder 22: Commission issued by Governor Isaac Johnson of Louisiana to Lawrence D. Nicholls, Ascension Parish, 1847 March 23

Document signed. In English.

Lawrence D. Nicholls was commissioned Clerk of the Fourth District Court of Louisiana, Parish of Ascension.

Folder 23: Act of sale of property in East Baton Rouge Parish, from the estate of Margaret Keizer to Henry W. Fowler, 1847 April 8

Document. Signed: L.C. Morris, Sheriff, East Baton Rouge Parish. In English.

The Sheriff of East Baton Rouge Parish certified that, upon orders from the Seventh Judicial District Court of West Feliciana Parish, regarding the succession of Margaret Keizer, he held a public auction of a tract of land of 300 arpents, situated in East Baton Rouge Parish, property of the estate of the deceased. The land was adjudicated to Henry W. Fowler for $650.

Folder 24: Sale of slaves by Rosina Schnerringer, New Orleans, to Charles LaBédoyère Huchet Kernion, New Orleans, 1847 September 23

Document. Notarized copy, dated 1847 September 25, signed by L[ucie]n Hermann. In English.

Before the Notary Hermann in New Orleans, Rosina Schnerringer, widow of Joseph Bruder, divorced wife of Frederick Thomas, sold to Charles LaBédoyère Huchet Kernion for $1,600 two male slaves - Chapman, age twenty-one, "a good gardener, seller and house servant," and Willis, age sixteen, a "good cook and house servant."

Folder 25: Cancellation of contract to sell slave, an agreement between Joseph Bruneau and Edouard Rieffel, both of New Orleans, 1847 November 18

Document. Notarized contemporary copy, signed by O. Drouet. In French.

Before Notary Public Onésiphore Drouet, New Orleans, appeared Joseph Bruneau and Edouard Rieffel. They declared that, by an act passed on 1847 September 16 before Notary Félix Percy, Rieffel had sold to Bruneau a slave named George, age twenty-five. Bruneau, in turn, assumed responsibility for payment of two promissory notes, one for 550 piastres and the other for 400. Since the sale, however, Bruneau had discovered that the slave had a chronic illness. He asked Rieffel to take the slave back, and Rieffel agreed to do so. Rieffel declared that he had received the slave and released Bruneau from obligation for payment of the notes.

Folder 26: Commission issued by Governor Isaac Johnson of Louisiana to L[awrence] D. Nicholls, Ascension Parish, 1847 December 11

Document signed. In English.

Lawrence D. Nicholls was commissioned Clerk of the Fourth Judicial Court, Parish of Ascension.

This item can be found in the Collection 600 Oversize Area, Drawer 1.

Folder 27: Brief of Thomas J. Durant, attorney representing the United States, in the case of the Heirs of Jean Antoine Bernard Dauterive versus the United States, 1847 December 20

Document. Unnotarized, undated contemporary copy. In French.

Durant submitted the brief to the United States District Court for the State of Louisiana. The Dauterive heirs were seeking to secure title to an area of more than 200,000 acres, known as Vermilion Prairie, which they claimed had been granted to their ancestor Jean Antoine Bernard Dauterive presented numerous arguments, backed by citations of legal precedents, to invalidate the claim. In effect, he denied the legality of the French concession and inquired into the reasons for the petitioners' long delay, until 1837, in filing claim. In the margin of each page are arguments, which appear to be in the hand of Louis Bouligny, refuting the points made by Durant.

Folder 28: Sale of slave by Marie Louise Marthe Tonton Cuzelar, widow of Emile Sainet, in Paris, to Robert Murphy, New Orleans, 1848 May 18

Document. Signed: Bernard Marigny, Register [of Conveyances], 1848 June 12. In English.

John Parker, as New Orleans attorney for the widow Sainet in Paris, sold to Robert Murphy a male slave named Charles, age eighteen for $700.

Folder 29: Sale of slave by Thomas Boudar, New Orleans, to Jérôme Tolédano, Jefferson Parish, 1848 May 26

Document. Signed: Bernard Marigny, Register [of Conveyances], 1848 June 14. In French.

Boudar sold to Tolédano for $1,800 two male slaves - James Howard, age twenty, and George Copeney, age nineteen. [This document is filed with a slave sale dated 1848 May 18, widow Sainet to Robert Murphy.]

This item is Box 10, Folder 28.

Folder 30: Receipt issued by the New Orleans Insurance Company to John Parker, 1848 September 27

Document. Signed: J.M. Lapeyre, President protem. In English.

The New Orleans Insurance Company received from Parker $57, premium for one year on a policy.

Folder 31: Sale of slave by Charles T. Dixon, Amite County, Mississippi, to Ransom J. Causey, [Amite County, Mississippi], 1848 November 7

Document. Certified copy, dated 1848 November 7, signed by B.W. Smith, Clerk of the Probate Court, Amite County. In English.

Dixon sold a male slave named Isaac to Causey for $700.

Folder 32: Act of donation of slave by Mary Norton Gardner, Saint Landry Parish, to Anna Gardner, Saint Landry Parish, 1849 February 24

Document. Notarized copy, dated 1849 July 3, signed by F[rederick] C. Kauffman. In English.

Mary Norton, widow of Thomas Gardner, gave to her daughter Anna Gardner, wife of Orimel Hinckley, a young female slave named Edy, eleven years old. Edy was the daughter of the slave Phrony, who was given to Mary Norton by her father before her marriage to Thomas Gardner. The appraised value of the slave was $300.

Folder 33: Letter from Dr. Sam[ue]l A. Cartwright, New Orleans, to an unnamed individual, 1849 March 29, April 17

Autograph letter signed. In English.

Dr. Cartwright gave detailed procedures for the treatment of cholera in slaves working in the field (March 29) for the treatment of "collapse cholera" (April 17).

Folder 34: Personal letter from J[ames] Johnston, New Orleans, to Captain O. Hinckley, New Albany, Indiana, 1849 June 1

Digital surrogates for items in this folder can be found here: http://cdm16313.contentdm.oclc.org:80/cdm/ref/collection/p16313coll51/id/2400.

Autograph letter signed. In English.

Johnston gave an account of his recent trial in Opelousas in which he was acquitted of charges of having whipped a free black man.

Folder 35: Decision rendered by Judge Theodore H. McCaleb, United States District Court, New Orleans, to the land claim of the heirs of Jean Antoine Bernard Dauterive, 1849 June 14

Document. Unnotarized contemporary copy of a certified copy, dated 1849 June 18, signed by Robert M. Lusher, Clerk, United States District Court. In French.

Judge McCaleb, in his decision, reiterated the historical basis of the Dauterive claim to a certain tract of land measuring forty-four arpents frontage on the Mississippi River and extending back to the Atchafalaya River. The original grant was made in 1717 to Paris Duvernay, who subsequently sold his concession to Dauterive in 1756. Later, the Spanish government validated title. McCaleb explained the status of the grant under the terms of the transfer and under United States law. He confirmed the claim of the Dauterive heirs with certain limitations and ordered a survey to establish the exact boundaries of the tract.

Folder 36: Power of attorney given by Zaiede Celle, widow of Augustin Dellucky, Saint Mary Parish, to J. Cestia, New Orleans, 1849 June 25

Document signed. In English.

The widow Dellucky gave Cestia the power to purchase on her behalf a black woman named Juliane for $500.

Folder 37: Receipt for payment of fees to the Phoenix Fire Company Number 8, New Orleans, by William Peterson, 1849 August 19

Autograph document. Signed: Chas Lovenskiod, Secry. In English.

Peterson paid fourth-year fees in the amount of $13.50 to the Phoenix Fire Company Number 8.

Folder 38: Commission issued by Governor Isaac Johnson to Louisiana to William W. Pugh, Assumption Parish, 1849 December 27

Document signed. Countersigned: Charles Gayarre, Secretary of State. In English.

Governor Johnson commissioned Pugh as Superintendent of Public Education in Assumption Parish, the office to which Pugh had been duly elected.

Folder 39: Sale of slaves by John S. Deaderick, no place, to Ferdinand Kennett, no place, 1850 March 28

Autograph document signed. In English.

Deaderick sold to Kennett a young male slave named Jake, age fifteen, for $500.

Folder 40: Notarial acts concerning shares of capital funds stock of the Citizens' bank owned by Casimir Lacoste, New Orleans, and his sons Pierre and Antoine Bellegarde Casimir Lacoste, New Orleans, 1850 June 20

Document. Notarized copy, dated 1850 June 28, signed by Phi[lippe] Lacoste. In French.

On 1848 October 25 Casimir Lacoste had sold to his sons Pierre and Antoine Bellegarde Casimir Lacoste, for $40,000, the undivided half of a sugar plantation situated five miles below New Orleans, together with half interest in the sixty slaves (names and ages given) living on the property and half of 746 shares of stock in the Citizens' Bank. The shares were transferred to the sons on the condition that they pay half the value. In accordance with the agreement they pledged the necessary security with a stock note in favor of the bank.

Folder 41: Bill issued by Tho[ma]s Russell, Clerk, Police Jail, New Orleans, to George Lanaux, New Orleans, 1850 September 7

Autograph document signed. In English.

The bill in the amount of $7.25 was for the apprehension and three days' detention of Lanaux's slave Joseph in the jail of the Third Municipality.

Folder 42: Power of attorney given by John D. Fink, New Orleans, to D[iedrick] Bullerdieck, New Orleans, 1850 October 1

Autograph document signed. Countersigned: Ferd. Heinr. Finck, witness. In English.

Fink granted Bullerdieck, his attorney, the power to collect rents and other monies owed to him.

Folder 44: Receipt for payment of dues issued by the Firemen's Charitable Association, New Orleans, to William Peterson, [New Orleans], 1851 January 1

Document. Signed: E.L. Bercier, Treasurer. In English.

Peterson, member of the Phoenix Fire Company Number 8, paid $3 dues to Firemen's Charitable Association for the year 1851.

Folder 45: Receipt issued by the Citizens' Bank of Louisiana, New Orleans, to A. Billaud, 1851 May 27

Document. Signed: J. Déjan, teller. In English.

The Citizens' Bank issued Billaud a receipt for $30 that he paid as a contribution of one dollar per share on thirty shares he owned.

Folder 46: Will and testament of John David Fink, New Orleans, 1851 June 18

Document. Notarized copy, dated 1851 June 18, signed by Edwin L. Lewis. In English.

Fink stated that he was a native of the town of Winnenden in the Kingdom of Württemberg, and was unmarried. After establishing several legacies and providing for the emancipation of eleven slaves, Fink bequeathed the remainder of his estate to his sister Carolina Fink Pfaeflin, resident to Rommelshausen, Württemberg, and to the wife of this stepbrother Ferdinand Heinrick Fink, Carolina Marie Fink, resident of Ludwigsburg, Germany, and her twelve children. Fink appointed Diederick Bullerdieck and Philip Geiger executors.

Folder 47: Receipt for payment of dues to the Firemen's Charitable Association and the Phoenix Fire Company Number 8, New Orleans, by William Peterson, 1851 August 19

Document. Signed: Louis Power, Secretary. In English.

Peterson paid $23 for sixth-year dues of the Firemen's Charitable Association and the Phoenix Fire Company Number 8.

Folder 48: Notarial acts concerning a stock note and a mortgage on slaves pledged by Jacques Adolphe Livaudais, New Orleans, in favor of the Citizen's Bank of Louisiana, 1851 October 9

Document. Notarized copy, dated 1852 April 29, signed by Ad[olphe] Boudousquié. In French.

On 1851 April 26 Livaudais and his wife, Rosa Marigny, had acquired from Casimir Lacoste a sugar plantation, 746 shares of the stock in the Citizens' Bank, and forty-seven slaves (names and ages given) attached to the plantation. There were existing mortgages on the property in favor of the bank, a stock note and a mortgage on the seventeen slaves who substituted for the twenty-two slaves originally mortgaged to the bank.

Folder 49: Sale of slave by Jonathan Smith, no place, to Ferdinand Kennett, Washington County, Missouri, 1851 October 21

Autograph document signed. In English.

Smith sold to Kennett a male slave named Alexander, age thirty-one, for $800.

Folder 50: Sale of slaves by P. Cole, no place, to Ferdinand Kennett, Washington County, Missouri, 1851 October 25

Autograph document signed. In English.

Cole sold to Kennett for $2,800 a slave family - Peter, age fifty-one, Mary, forty-six, and their eight children, ages one to seventeen.

Folder 51: Political songs in support of candidacy of Marigny Mandeville against James P. Freret [in New Orleans], 1851 November

Manuscript. Initialed: C.S.v. B. In French.

These special lyrics, written to sing to the melodies of popular songs of the day, supported Marigny Mandeville, Democratic Party candidate for the office of Sheriff of Orleans Parish, against James P. Freret, the Whig Party nominee. [Freret won.]

Folder 52: Certification of sale of property belonging to the estate of the late Auguste Tete, Assumption Parish, at sheriff's auction, to the Citizens' Bank of Louisiana, 1852 March 27

Document. Signed: A[ugustus] F[ranklin] Hickman, Sheriff Assumption Parish. In English.

On 1852 January 2, Sheriff Hickman noted, the Fifth Judicial District Court of Louisiana, Assumption Parish, issued a writ of fieri facias in the suit of the Citizens' Bank against the succession of Auguste Tete. Accordingly, Hickman seized Tete's property, which consisted of a sugar plantation on Bayou Lafourche, 332 shares of capital stock in the Citizens' Bank, and a number of slaves (names and ages given). After giving proper notice to the widow, Rose Clément, and to the public, Hickman held a public auction of the Tete estate on March 6. The Citizens' Bank purchased the property for $23,100, which amount was insufficient to cover the mortgage it held. Subsequently, the Sheriff made public records of more than twenty other mortgages against the Tete estate registered in the Recorder's office and totaling about $150,000. Since the proceeds of the sale produced no excess to satisfy the numerous creditors, other than the Citizens' Bank, holder of the first mortgage, Hickman ordered the cancellation of all liens and adjudication of title, clear of debt, to the Citizens' Bank.

Folder 53: Bill issued by J.P. McDonald, boot and shoe dealer, New Orleans, to the estate of John McDonogh, [New Orleans], 1852 June 30

Autograph document signed. In English.

McDonald submitted a bill for $40.25 for shoes that he provided McDonogh's slaves during May and June 1852. He indicated the type of shoe (chiefly brogans), the first name of the slave, and the price of each pair.

Folder 54: Business letter from W[illia]m W.W. Spencer, New Orleans, to an unnamed female, [New Orleans?], 1852 July 27

Autograph letter signed. In English.

At the request of the addressee's slave, William, Spencer wrote to ask that William be given written permission to remain with him for the fall and winter, during which time he would hire William to work. In return Spencer guaranteed the addressee $35 per month and the proper treatment of the man.

Folder 55: Business letter from Robert C. Beard, Talahatchee County, Mississippi, to B[enjamin] L[eonard] C[ovington] Wailes, Washington, Mississippi, 1852 October 4

Autograph letter signed. In English.

Beard wished to buy 400 acres in the old Elliott tract at three dollars per acre, an offer Wailes had made some time earlier. He could make an initial payment in January and give interest-bearing promissory notes for the remainder.

Folder 56: Preamble and resolution adopted by the Board of the Milne Asylum for Destitute Orphan Boys, New Orleans, 1852 October 15

Document. Signed by P. Chs. Cuvelier, L[oui]s Duvigneaud, and three other members of the Board. In English.

The preamble stated that the Board of the Milne Asylum for Destitute Orphan Boys had entered into contract with E.H. Durrell and P.C. Wright for draining of swamplands bequeathed to them and three other institutions by the late Alexander Milne. Two of the other recipients - the Female Orphan Society [Poydras Home] and the Society for the Relief of Destitute Orphan Boys - were in accord with the agreement, but the assent of the fourth - the Milne Asylum for Destitute Orphan Girls - was necessary before the project could proceed. The Milne Asylum for Girls, however, had not functioned as an organization for a number of years. The Board, therefore, resolved to petition the Governor of Louisiana, Joseph Walker, to appoint persons to the Board of the Girls Asylum that they might join in the aforesaid contract, which was advantageous to all four legatees.

Folder 57: Business letter from B[enjamin] L[eonard] C[ovington] Wailes, Washington, Mississippi to Robert C. Beard, Talahatchee County, Mississippi, 1852 November 3

Autograph letter signed. In English.

Wailes wrote, in reply to Beard's letter of October 4 (q.v.), that he had made the offer to sell the land a year ago, and that since the prices had risen twenty-five percent. He would, however, sell Beard another tract of 480 acres for the old price of three dollars per acre. At the bottom of the page Wailes wrote, "Sold to R.H. Coleman on 1852 December 9." [Wailes letter is written on the back of Beard's and is filed under the earlier date.]

This item is in Box 10, Folder 55.

Folder 58: Settlement of Adelaïde Hayde, widow of George Roussel, Saint John the Baptist Parish, 1852

Document. Unsigned, undated [copy?]. In French.

Charles Roussel, Félix Becnel, and George Lanaux, executors, divided the estate (net worth $130,277.52) of the widow Roussel in equal shares among eight heirs, whose names were given.

Folder 59: List of slaves for sale [from the estate of Adelaïde Haydel, widow of] George Roussel, [Saint John the Baptist Parish], 1852

Broadside. In French.

The document gives the name, age, and origin of each slave, as well as any infirmities or special skills. Penciled in by name of each slave is the name of the buyer and the price paid.

Folder 60: Personal letter from Martha Elliott, Indianapolis, Indiana, to "Jennie," no place, 1853 April 2

Autograph letter signed. In English.

The writer mentioned the "severe" two-inch snowstorm they had had and told how much she missed the South. Having been recently married in Newport, she was setting up housekeeping in Indianapolis. She described the wedding and her social life in the town.

Folder 61: Personal letter from Robinson Mumford, Bayou Sara, to R.J. Palfrey, New Orleans, 1853 April 13

Autograph letter signed. In English.

Mumford wrote R.J. Palfrey, Cashier of the [Branch Bank Louisiana State Bank], to enclose a note for collection and to inform the bank of four checks that he had written, listing recipient and amount of each.

Folder 62: Procès-verbal of the public auction of the estate of John H. Gordon, deceased, held in community with his widow Lydia E. Morse, Saint Landry Parish, 1853 September 3

Document. Undated, certified copy, signed by A. Garrigues. In English.

Pursuant to an order of the District Court of Saint Landry Parish, three slaves from the Gordon estate were sold at public auction - the female Mana to the widow Gordon for $610; the male Jacob to Captain Hin[c]kley for $1,280; and the male Honorhe to Robert Taylor for $1,110.

Folder 63: Act of sale of properties, a transaction between Hippolyte Norès and Achille Régulus Morel, both of New Orleans, 1853 October 12

Document. Notarized contemporary copy, signed by Florian Malus. In French.

Before Notary Malus in Orleans Parish, Hippolyte Norès sold to Achille Régulus Morel the following properties: 1) a lot in Faubourg Trémé, situated in the square bounded by Hospital, Johnson, Quartier, and Galvez, which he acquired from Anne Clotilde Penne, f.w.c. in 1847; 2) a triangular lot on the same block, which he acquired from Auguste Brocard; 3) two other lots in the same square, which he bought from Frederick William Colquehoun. Norès sold the lots for 4,450 piastres.

Folder 64: Brief of the defendants in the case of the United States versus the heirs of Jean Antoine Bernard Dauterive, claimants to Vermilion Prairie, before 1853 December

Document. Unnotarized, incomplete contemporary copy. In French.

The Dauterive heirs presented proof that the land grant in their possessions was a certified copy taken from the register of French concessions in the Land Office, New Orleans. The defendants also refuted the government's argument that the description of the boundaries of the tract was imprecise.

Folder 65: Journal of [Joseph W. Field], merchant, Mobile, Alabama, 1853 December 5-1870 December 25

Bound manuscript. In English.

[Field was a wholesale dealer in boots, shoes, and hats.] The entries in the journal were sporadic. Mostly Field gave news of epidemics and deaths in Mobile. He described two storms that inundated Mobile in 1860, on August 12 and on September 16. He was an extremely devout man and a member of Christ Church. He often wrote lengthy religious disquisitions in the volume.

This item is found in Oversize Bound Volume 2.

Folder 66: Act of sale of property by Casimir Lacoste, Orleans Parish, to Pierre Lacoste and Antoine Bellegarde Casimir Lacoste, Orleans Parish, 1853 December 17

Document. Notarized copy, dated 1854 March 2, signed by Phi[lippe] Lacoste. In French.

Casimir Lacoste sold to Pierre and A.B.C. Lacoste for 11,000 piastres an undivided half interest in seven contiguous lots, situated five miles below New Orleans, together with half interest in twelve slaves on the property and all buildings, equipment, and animals. As Pierre and A.B.C. Lacoste already owned an undivided half interest, this transaction gave them full ownership. The document also gives an account of mortgages against the property.

Folder 67: Decision rendered by the Superior Court of the United States in the case of the United States versus the heirs of Jean Antoine Bernard Dauterive, 1853 December

Document. Unnotarized contemporary copy. In English.

The United States appealed the judgment of the District Court, which had confirmed the claim of the Dauterive heirs to a tract of land in Louisiana. The Supreme Court dismissed the appeal "for want of Jurisdiction without prejudice to any legal title of the petitioners." [Arguments and decision were published in: United States Supreme Court, Report of Cases...December Term, 1853; Howard, 14-29.]

Folder 68: Plat of township 15 and 16 S.R. 16E, South Eastern District (Donaldsonville) Louisiana, 1854 January 25

Document. Signed: McColloh, Surveyor General Louisiana. In English.

The plat showed several properties situated on Bayou Terrebonne that made up Township 15 S.R. 16E. Owners of the various pieces of land were H.M. Thibodaux, Mrs. H.S. Thibodaux, Leufroy Barras, Walker Gilbert, Henri S. Thibodaux, Hubert Bellanger, Auguste Babin, Joseph Mollère, N. Meriam and J. Dutton, and B.G. Thibodaux.

Folder 69: Business letter from Hugh M. Keary, Cataster Grove [Louisiana?], to Juan Y. de Egana, New Orleans, 1854 January 29

Autograph letter signed. In English.

Keary placed an order with Egana, commission merchant in New Orleans, for one thousand barrels of molasses, one thousand of sugar, five of apples, two of oranges, and three of whiskey, and eight dozen wool hats.

Folder 70: Letters of administration of Leufroy Barras in the succession of Brigette Bellanger, deceased widow of H.S. Thibodaux, 1854 February 9

Document. Signed: J. Aycock, Clerk [of Court]. In English.

The Fifth Judicial District Court, Terrebonne Parish, ordered that Leufroy Barras be given full faith and credit when acting in his capacity as administrator of the succession of Brigitte Bellanger, deceased widow of H.S. Thibodaux.

Folder 71: Act of sale of property, a transaction between Samuel Smith, New Orleans, and Henry Claiborne Thibodaux and Bannon G. Thibodaux, both of Terrebonne Parish, 1854 April 21

Document. Notarized copy, dated 1854 April 24, signed by Ad. Boudousquié. In English.

Before Adolphe Boudousquié, Notary Public in New Orleans, Samuel Smith sold to Henry Claiborne and Bannon G. Thibodaux, represented by William G. Hewes, a tract of land of 599.79 acres, situated in Terrebonne Parish in the rear of the plantation of the purchasers, for the price of $1,943.33.

Folder 72: Record book of the sawmill of [Menard, Chopin, and Trouard?], [Jefferson Parish?], 1854 June-1857 April

Bound manuscript. In French.

The volume contains a record of the movement of timber and the number of logs cut each day at the mill of [Menard, Chopin, and Trouard?] in [Jefferson Parish?]

Folder 73: Personal letter from William Sojourner, Bon Ridg [sic], to A.K. Farrar, "at Home", 1854 July 2

Autograph letter signed. In English.

William Sojourner, [who was probably the overseer of Farrar's property], reported on the condition of the crops ("the cotton looks vary fine" but "the corn is not vary good"), work done recently ("I hav dedden son sense you war over her"), the health of the workers ("wee hav had rite smarte sicnis her latly but it is giting through with know...Elie and janes now is sick but I think that they will be able to go out by monday"), and other news ('the dun Marer is got a vary fine coalt").

Folder 74: Business letter from A.T. Simmons, no place, to Buchannon, Carroll and Company, New Orleans, 1855 January 3

Autograph letter signed. In English.

Simmons informed Buchannon, Carroll and Company, commission merchants in New Orleans, that he had just bought from John Williams a farm with seven slaves for $9,500, which was to be paid in five installments. The first was due in a week, and he requested the firm to allow him to write a sight draft on them in favor of Williams. Since the draft would be more than his crop would bring, he offered a mortgage on the farm as security.

Folder 75: Sale of slave by the widow of Louis Avart, New Orleans, to Octave Colomb, Saint James Parish, 1855 February 21

Document. Notarized contemporary copy signed by J[ame]s Graham. In English.

Before Notary Graham in New Orleans, Mme Claude Augustine Eugénie Delassize, widow of Louis Avart, sold to Octave Colomb of Saint James Parish, for $1,500, a male slave named Jean, about forty-two years old. The slave was guaranteed against illness, "but not against the vices prescribed by law." [See also two related items: Biographical Sketch and Snapshot of former slave Jim Smith, dated circa 1910.]

Folder 76: Sale of slaves by Sam[ue]l Gates, no place, to Ferdinand Kennett, no place, 1855 March 12

Document signed. In English.

Gates sold to Kennett for $1,000 three slave children - Sam, age twelve; Walsh, seven; and John, five.

Folder 77: Certificate of evaluation of the property of Henry Michael Hyams and Eleazer Levy Hyams in Rapides Parish made by the Citizens' Bank of Louisiana, 1855 November 26

Document. Signed: E[variste] Archinard, C[ésar] Archinard, evaluators. In English.

On behalf of the Citizens' Bank, Evariste and César Archinard made an evaluation of the land, Parish owned by H. M. Hyams and E.L. Hyams. The document gives gross value of production in 1852, 1853, and 1854. The total appraised value was $114,530.

Folder 78: Business letter from Dr. M. de la Rosa, New Orleans, to [Diederick Bullerdieck?], [New Orleans], 1855 December 10

Autograph letter signed. In English.

[The recipient of the letter was taking care of John D. Fink during his final illness.] The doctor stated that he would operate on Fink for $50 in advance and $250 after. If he treated Fink but did not perform surgery, the fee for his services would be $50 in advance and $150 after. If this arrangement was not acceptable and the patient required no further consultations, de la Rosa would send a bill for the three visits he had made.

Box 11: National period, 1856-1861
Folder 1: Bill issued by John Stritzinger, New Orleans, to the estate of John D. Fink, 1856 January 4

Autograph document signed. In English.

Stritzinger submitted a bill for $100 for services rendered in preparing and laying out the body of the deceased Fink.

Folder 2: Bill issued by J[ohn] Robert, apothecary and chemist, New Orleans, to the estate of John D. Fink, [New Orleans], 1856 January 19

Document. In English.

Robert submitted a bill for $400 for making an analysis of the urine of the deceased John Fink.

Folder 3: Bill issued by the pastor of the First German Protestant Church, New Orleans, to the estate of John D. Fink, [New Orleans], 1856 January 24

Document. In English.

The pastor submitted a bill of $150 for the funeral service and the graveside sermon for the deceased John Fink.

Folder 4: Bill issued by Dr. William Bertram, New Orleans, to the estate of John D. Fink [New Orleans], 1856 January 30

Document. In English.

Bertram submitted a bill for $5,000, of which $4,500 was for medical treatment and medicines for the deceased John Fink; $350 for medical services for Fink's male slave, age ten, who had an inflammation of the hand that required surgery; and $150 for treatment of a female slave, who was suffering "with a bilious and nervous fever."

Folder 5: Bill issued by Dr. A[lfred] Mercier, New Orleans, to the estate of John D. Fink, [New Orleans], 1856 February 4

Document signed. In English.

Mercier submitted a bill for $1,200 for medical services he rendered to the deceased John Fink.

Folder 6: Business letter from Dr. M. de la Rosa, New Orleans, to [Diederick] Bullerdieck, [executor of the estate of John D. Fink], [New Orleans], 1856 February 9

Autograph letter signed. In English.

De la Rosa appealed to Bullerdieck to pay him, on account, thirty or forty dollars of the amount owed from Fink's estate.

Folder 7: Extract from the minutes of the Board of Directors of the Bank of Louisiana, New Orleans, 1856 March 13

Extract from the minutes of the Board of Directors of the Bank of Louisiana, New Orleans.

The Board discounted three notes, each of $15,000, to be drawn by Ezra Davis and secured by a first mortgage on his sugar plantation in Saint Charles Parish. The first note was to be endorsed by Buchannon, Carroll, and Company, New Orleans.

Folder 8: Bill issued by Doctors [Alfred] Mercier and [Stanford E.] Chaillé, Circus Street Hospital, New Orleans to G[eorge] Lanaux, [Plaquemines Parish?], 1856 April 10

Document. Signed: G.B. Ebeling for Drs. Mercier and Chaillé. In English.

Doctors Mercier and Chaillé presented Lanaux a bill for $47 for medical treatment and seven days' hospitalization of his slave Joachim at the Circus Street [now South Rampart Street] Hospital, [situated between Perdido and Poydras].

Folder 9: Sale of slave by Tho[ma]s S. White, no place, to Ferdinand Kennett, Washington County, Missouri, 1856 April 18

Autograph document signed. In English.

White sold Kennett a male slave named Frank, age thirty-seven, for $1,000.

Folder 10: Procès-verbal of the sheriff's sale of the slaves of Mrs. J.J. Tainturier, New Orleans, to George Lanaux, Plaquemines Parish, 1856 April 22

Document. Signed: Jno M. Bell, Sheriff. In English.

Sheriff Bell, acting on an order of the Fifth District Court, New Orleans, in the suit of Mrs. J.J. Tainturier against her husband, advertised the auction of the female slave Celeste, age thirty-two, and her three children, ages two to eight. The sale was held on 1856 April 22 in the rotunda of the City Exchange. The highest bidder was Theodore Lanaux, representing George Lanaux, who bought the slaves for $1,750.

Folder 11: Statement of accounts of the succession of John D. Fink, prepared by D[iederick] Bullerdieck, testament executor, New Orleans, 1856 June 12

Document signed. In English.

The statement listed assets/income and disbursements, including payment of bequests to legatees. Bullerdieck allowed himself $15,000 for "15 years service as agent before the death of Fink" and $4,758.69 for his services as testamentary executor.

Folder 12: Act of sale of property by Garland Pendleton Ware, Pointe Coupée Parish to Jacob Haight Morrison, New Orleans, 1856 August 7

Document. Notarized contemporary copy, signed by Theo[dore] Guyol. In English.

Before Notary Public Theodore Guyol, New Orleans, Ware sold to Morrison, for $92,000, two tracts of land in Pointe Coupée Parish bought from Charles Decoux in 1853 and another lot in Pointe Coupée purchased from Raymond Vignes in 1853. The entire property was a sugar plantation, and the sale included buildings, machinery, tools, livestock, and fifty-three slaves (names and ages given).

Folder 13: Day-book of the firm of Meyer and Hymel, grocers, Thibodaux, [Louisiana], 1856 October 7-1857 April 27

Bound manuscript. In English.

The entries in this daily journal gave the customers' names, an itemized list of their grocery purchases, and total for goods sold by the store on each particular day. At the end of the month, each day's receipts were added to get the monthly totals for cash and credit sales.

Folder 14: Land patent to swamplands claimed by George D. Shadburne in Madison Parish, 1856 December 2

Document. Signed: Robert C. Wickliffe, Governor of Louisiana. In English.

The Governor of Louisiana granted Shadburne title to 357 acres of swamplands that the latter had located in Madison Parish under Warrant No. 1224.

Folder 15: "An Act to incorporate an Asylum in the City of New Orleans for Protestant Widows and Orphans under the name and style of the 'Fink Asylum' ", 1856

Manuscript. Undated, incomplete draft written by an unidentified person. In English.

The manuscript, which has the heading indicated in the caption above, quoted the section of the will of John David Fink in which he delegated his estate (after payment of certain legacies) for the establishment of the Fink Asylum. Following the quote are articles of incorporation that may have been submitted to the Louisiana Legislature for its consideration. This last part is in rough form with several crossovers and changes of wording.

Folder 16: Sale of slave by James Catlett, no place, to Ferdinand Kennett, [Washington County, Missouri], 1857 January 20

Document signed. In English.

Catlett sold to Kennett a male slave named Michael, age thirty-one, for $1,200.

Folder 17: Official letter from [Michel-Jacques-François], B[ar]on Achard, Paris, to [François Lambert, New Orleans], 1857 December 19

Letter signed. In French.

Baron Achard was representing François Lambert in a pressing a claim against the French government. Achard requested Lambert to send documents to substantiate the claim. In regard to Lambert's inquiry about an army pension, the eligibility requirements were loss of limb in combat or thirty years' service, neither of which Lambert fulfilled. Lambert could not receive the Légion d'Honneur without producing a copy of his service record, which he had lost. The only decoration that he might claim was the Medaille de Saint-Hélène, which was granted to all who served under the Republic under the Republic or the First Empire.

Folder 18: Bill for keeping of a slave in the city police jail, New Orleans, issued to G[eorge] Lanaux, no place, 1858 January 2

Document. Signed: E[dward] Planchard, [storekeeper, parish jail]. In English.

The police jail billed Lanaux $20.70 for sixteen days' confinement of his runaway slave and for miscellaneous fees.

Folder 19: Permit issued by the Mayoralty of New Orleans to [Juan] Miangolarra, New Orleans, 1858 March 8

Document. Signed: Jules Cassard, Secretary. In English.

The Mayor's office granted Juan Miangolarra permission to bring his slave woman Brigida, age thirty, from Cuba to New Orleans.

Folder 20: Certificate of mortgages existing against the property of John L. Lobdell, West Baton Rouge Parish, in favor of the Citizens' Bank of Louisiana, 1858 March 15

Document. Certified copy, dated 1859 March 22, signed by A. Bernard, Jr., Recorder, West Baton Rouge Parish. In English.

The Recorder of West Baton Rouge Parish certified that his records showed the existence of four separate mortgages in favor of the Citizens' Bank on the sugar plantation, other properties, and the slaves of John L. Lobdell and his wife Ann Mathilda Stirling.

Folder 21: Act of sale of property, a transaction between George Lhote and George André Reek, vendors, and Pierre Villarceaux Macarty, buyer, all of all New Orleans, 1858 May 22

Document. Notarized contemporary copy, signed J. Agaisse. In French.

Before Notary Public Jean Agaisse, Orleans Parish, appeared Messrs. Lhote and Reek [Reed?], parties of the first part, and Macarty, party of the second. Both parties had claimed a triangular lot in the Faubourg Trémé in the block bounded by Johnson, Hospital, Galvez, and Quartier. Lhote and Reek sold their claim to Macarty for fifty piastres. A survey sketch is appended.

Folder 22: Bond of Silas H. Thompson and John M. Thompson, [Amite County, Mississippi?], in favor of Ransom J. Causey, [Amite County, Mississippi?], 1858 August 10

Document signed. In English.

The Thompsons bound themselves to Causey in the amount of $3,600, as guarantee against all claims by Elijah J. Thompson, a minor, or his heirs, resulting from Causey's tutorship of said Elijah J. Thompson. Differences arose between Causey and his ward over the former's administration and sale of the real estate of Thompson's late father. The differences were settled when Causey gave $1,800 to Silas H. Thompson, present guardian of the boy.

Folder 23: Certificate issued by the Légion d'Honneur certified that François Lambert, circa 1858-1859

Document. Rubber-stamp signature of the Duc de Plaisance. In French.

The Grand Chancellor of the Imperial Order of the Légion d'Honneur certified that François Lambert, a Frenchman living in the United States, having served during the period 1792-1815, had received the Medaile de Sainte-Hélène.

Folder 24: Sale of slaves by Joshua M. Johnston, New Orleans, to Oramel Hinckley, Saint Landry Parish, 1859 January 3

Document. Notarized copy, dated 1859 January 4, signed by R[ichard] Brénan. In English.

Before Notary Public Richard Brénan of New Orleans, Johnston sold to Hinckley, for $1,150, an undivided half share in the slave Ben, age twenty-seven, valued at $1,300, and Jacob, alias Jake, age twenty-six, valued at $1,000. Johnston had acquired his half interest from the estate of his late brother James Johnston. The buyer was the owner of the other undivided half share.

Folder 25: Sale of slaves by M.F. White, no place, to Ferdinand Kennett, Jefferson County, Missouri, 1859 May 10

Autograph document signed. In English.

White sold to Kennett, for $2,200, a family of slaves - Cyrus, age fifty, his wife Fanny, forty-three, and their four female children, ages eight to fourteen.

Folder 26: Bill for keeping of slave in the city police jail, New Orleans, issued to G[eorge] Lanaux, no place, 1859 May 28

Document. Signed: John F. Planchard, [Clerk, parish jail]. In English.

The parish jail billed George Lanaux $14.05 for thirty-four days' confinement of his slave Alfred and for advertising, correction, and turnkey fees.

Folder 27: Commission issued by Governor Robert C. Wickliffe of Louisiana to John T. Michel, City of Jefferson, 1859 June 4

Document signed. In English.

The Governor of Louisiana granted Wilson title to eighty acres of swamplands that the latter had located under Warrant 6026 N.S.H. The land was situated in Section 9, Township 2, S.R. 2 East in the South Western District of Louisiana.

Folder 28: Land patent to swamplands granted to John G. Wilson in Avoyelles Parish, 1859 June 6

Document. Signed: Robert C. Wickliffe, Governor, Louisiana. In English.

The Governor of Louisiana granted Wilson title to eighty acres of swamplands that the latter had located under Warrant 6026 N.S.H. The land was situated in Section 9, Township 2, S.R. 2 East in the South Western District of Louisiana.

Folder 29: Personal letter from F[ranç]ois Lambert, New Orleans, to his granddaughter Zoé Campbell, no place, 1859 October 26

Autograph letter signed. In French.

François Lambert, aged eighty-three, wrote about his infirmities and about the dire poverty in which he lived.

Folder 30: Sale of slaves by M.F. White, no place, to F[erdinand] Kennett, [Jefferson County, Missouri], 1859 October 27

Document signed. In English.

White sold to Kennett, for $2,300, a slave family - Jack, age twenty-six, his wife Darcus, twenty-two, and their three children, ages one to four. The buyer wrote on the document, "I paid $300 additional which M.F.W. owes me on these Negroes, F. Kennett."

Folder 31: Procès-verbal of the seizure and auction of slaves belonging to Moses F. White by Oscar Dover, Sheriff of Jefferson County, Missouri, 1859 November 8

Document signed. In English.

In accordance with the judgment and subsequent court order given in favor of Thomas W.B. Crews by the Circuit Court of Saline County, Missouri, against Moses F. White for $1,994 and costs, Sheriff Dover seized ten slaves belonging to White and offered them for public sale in Jefferson County on 1859 November 8. The slaves were sold separately, and Ferdinand Kennett bought all of them for a total of $310.

Folder 32: Power of attorney given by Madame André Billaud in France to an unnamed person, 1850s

Document. Unnotarized, undated copy; incomplete with several blanks to be filled in. In English.

Before the United States Consul in the city of [blank], France, appeared Marie-Joséphine Caroline Duclos and her husband André Billaud. Mme. Billaud granted power of attorney to [blank] of New Orleans to dispose of any matrimonial, dotal, or community rights she might have to immovable property and slaves in the State of Louisiana. In private the Consul advised Mme Billaud of her legal rights under Louisiana law and of the consequences of her action. She reiterated her position and in the presence of her husband once again renounced her rights with finality. The participants and unnamed witnesses signed the document.

Folder 33: Sale of slaves by James F. White, no place, to Colonel Ferdinand Kennett, [Jefferson County, Missouri], 1860 January 23

Document. Signed: "James M. White per T.W.B. Crews his Agent and Attorney in fact." In English.

On behalf of James M. White, crews sold to Colonel Kennett, for $3,400, a family of slaves - Lee, age thirty-four, his wife Judy, twenty-six, and their five children.

Folder 34: Act of mortgage granted by Elisée E. Mailhoit, Assumption Parish, in favor of Jean Baptiste Aucoin, Assumption Parish, 1860 March 21

Document. Certified copy, dated 1866 March 14, signed by L.W. Folse, Deputy Recorder. In English.

Before Notary Public Amedée Damas, Malhoit declared that he had drawn two promissory notes in the amount of $8,120 and $7,560, payable in favor of Jean Baptiste Aucoin and his wife Azelie Boudreau. To secure payment Malhoit gave Aucoin a mortgage on a sugar plantation, situated on Bayou Lafourche fourteen miles below Napoleonville, and the forty slaves (names and ages given) on the property.

Folder 35: Report Number 343, United States House of Representatives, the Committee on Private Land Claims, concerning confirmation of a land claim to the heirs of Jean Antoine Bernard Dauterive, 1860 April 6

Printed document. In English.

The Committee's Report accompanied House Bill Number 583. The report gave the history of the Dauterive claim and of court decisions in suits seeking confirmation of title. The committee concluded that the claim should be confirmed, reported a bill for that purpose (Number 583), and recommended its passage.

Folder 36: Land grant made by James Buchanan, President of the United States, City of Washington, to Adelaide Kernion, widow of Jean Jacques H. Kernion, 1860 June 15

Document signed. In English.

By Act of Congress of 1855 March 3, which granted bounty land to officers and soldiers in the military service of the United States, the President certified a grant of land to Adelaide Kernion, widow of J.J.H. Kernion, Private, Captain Dannoy's [Daunoy's?] Company, Louisiana Militia, War of 1812. The tract was situated near Monroe, Louisiana, and encompassed 160.30 acres.

Folder 37: Personal letter from Hugh Williams, Portmadoc, [Wales], to his nephew, no place, 1860 November 9

Autograph letter signed. In English.

Williams discussed shipbuilding, family news, and new buildings in Portmadoc, especially the churches.

Folder 38: Agreement between Edouard Jacob Jourdan, Vasseur Webre Jourdan, and Jean Baptiste Nöel Jourdan, Saint James Parish, and Citizens' Bank of Louisiana, 1860 December 15

Document. Notarized contemporary copy, signed by Ad[olphe] Boudousquié. In French.

Before the Notary Public Adolphe Boudousquié, New Orleans, appeared A. Cyprien Trémoulet, acting for the three Jourdans, residents of Saint James Parish. Also present was James D. Denegre, President of the Citizens' Bank, acting in accordance with the resolution passed by the bank directors at their December 10th meeting. Those present declared that the Jourdans were each owners of an undivided third of the following: 1) a sugar plantation in Saint James Parish, and two other surveyed sections of land; 2) fifty-seven slaves (names and ages given); and 3) 464 shares of capital funds stock of the Citizen's Bank, payment for which was guaranteed, along with payment for a loan of $10,337.60, by a mortgage given in 1834 by Noël Jourdan.

The three Jourdans, through their representative, in order to secure the transfer of the aforementioned stock shares to their name, furnished the bank a stock note in the amount of $10,337.60 to cover the loans due on the stock. To guarantee payment of the stock subscription and the principal and interest on the stock note, the Jourdans assumed the 1834 mortgage of Noël Jourdan. As further security guaranteeing the payment of capital and interest on the stock note, the Jourdans transferred the stock shares to the bank.

Folder 39: Essay on philosophy written by J. Josh. Girod, no place, 1860

Autograph manuscript signed. In French.

The essay dealt with philosophy and science.

Folder 40: Act of sale of property, a transaction between the City of New Orleans and Christopher Joynt, New Orleans, 1861 January 17

Document. Notarized copy, dated 1861 January 23, signed by Charles E. Fortier. In English.

A decree of the Supreme Court of Louisiana in 1857 empowered the City of New Orleans to administer funds from the estate of John D. Fink for the purpose of erecting and maintaining an Asylum for Protestant Widows and Orphans, in accordance with the provisions of the Fink will. Subsequently, the city offered certain properties for sale at auction, and Christopher Joynt purchased, for $4,000, a lot situated on Lafayette Street, between Franklin and Basin.

Folder 41: Act of sale of property by John S. Deaderick, Washington County, Missouri, to Ferdinand Kennett, Jefferson County, Missouri, 1861 January 18

Document signed. In English.

Deaderick sold his farm, which consisted of three Spanish grants near the mouth of the Platin [sic] River, to Kennett for $47,000. The document indicated Kennett's mode of payment in cash, stocks, notes, and slaves.

Folder 42: Power of attorney given by Ernest DeBlanc, Saint Martin Parish, to Charles DeBlanc, Jr., New Orleans, 1861 February 22

Autograph document signed. Signature authenticated by R[ichar]d T. Castin, Justice of the Peace, Saint Martin Parish. In English.

Ernest DeBlanc appointed Charles DeBlanc to represent him in the settlement of the succession of Marie Aglaé Fagot, widow of Pierre Rapp, Ernest DeBlanc gave Charles special power of attorney to reach a compromise with the other legatees in regard to the former's share of the estate and his part interest in ownership of four slaves.

Folder 43: Authorization given by F. [Jh?] De Lacroix, Saint Martin Parish, to his wife to represent her own interest in court, 1861 March 19

Autograph document signed. Signature authenticated by Abner D. Miner, Notary Public, New Iberia. In English.

De Lacroix gave his wife authorization to appear in court in the settlement of the succession of [Marie] Aglaé Fagot, widow of Pierre Rapp, and to sell her share of the estate. She was further empowered to sell the slave Angèle to Joséphine, a free woman of color, and the slave Marie to Edgard Marin, and to buy the other legatees' interest in the slaves Valcour and Charlotte.

Folder 44: Certificate issued by Louis St. Martin, Register of Names and Residence of Electors, New Orleans, to Anatole L.H. Kernion, 1861 March 22

Document. Signed: D.R. Perret, Deputy Register. In English.

The Register certified that Kernion, who resided at 225 Esplanade, had been registered as a qualified elector as a native-born citizen of the Confederate States. On this printed form with pertinent information filled in, the word "United" in the phrase "citizen of the United States" was crossed out and "Confederate" was substituted.

Folder 45: Sale of slaves by Fer[dinan]d Kennett, [Jefferson County, Missouri], to John S. Deaderick, [Jefferson County, Missouri], 1861 March 28

Document signed. In English.

Kennett sold to Deaderick, for $2,000, two female slaves - Greasy Beck, seventeen, and Lucy, twelve. [This document is filed with an Act of Sale of property, Deaderick to Kennett, 1861 January 18.]

Filed in Box 11, Folder 41.

Folder 46: Official letter from D[aniel] Beltzhoover, Headquarters Military District of Louisiana, New Orleans, to H[enry] W. Fowler, no place, 1861 April 26

Letter signed. In English.

Beltzhoover, Major, Regiment of Artillery, notified Fowler of his commission as 1st Lieutenant in the 1st Louisiana Artillery. He should report to Company B at Fort Jackson. Postscript advised Fowler to pick up his commission and be mustered in while he was in New Orleans.

Folder 47: Inventory of public property in the Land Office at New Orleans, 1861 May 15

Document. Certified copy, dated 1896 December 29, signed by Chas. H. Dickinson, Surveyor General [of] Louisiana. In English.

The inventory is a listing of registry books, maps collections, books of abstracts, miscellaneous bound records, loose documents, printed compilations, and reference books in the Land Office. Also included are an inventory and an evaluation of furniture in the office.

Folder 48: Act of sale of property, a transaction between Miguel Bisolari, New Orleans, and Madame Jacobine Saltzmann, widow of François Magny, New Orleans, 1861 May 24

Document. Notarized contemporary copy, signed by Félix Percy. In French.

Before Félix Percy, Notary Public in New Orleans, appeared Miguel Brisolari and Jacobine Saltzmann, widow of Magny, Brisolari sold, for the sum of 1,200 piastres, to Mme Magny the buildings situated on a lot that was owned by the Pontchartrain Railroad Company and was situated facing Elysian Fields in Milneburg.

Folder 49: Personal letter from James Martin, Algiers, [Louisiana], to W[illiam] H. Martin, Continental Guards, Virginia, 1861 July 8

Autograph letter signed. In English.

James Martin wrote to his on that the Lake coast was blocked, bu that the Confederates had taken Ship Island and fortified it. He mentioned a Union raid at Pearlington, [Mississippi], and gave some information about home defense. R.L. Robertson, Jr. had command of Fort Livingston and was "prepared to receive the Enimy with pills and duniplings." He advised his to keep a cool head and "to remember we are engaged in a just caus and a Holy caus and we are contending for Our Own rights on Our Own Soil and Own firesides." He wished that the Union would let the South go in peace," but the ambitious demagogues and Fanatic of the North have determined to try to subjugate us and make us bow to their bigoted and Outrageous will."

Folder 50: Personal letter from Amelius N. Haydel, Camp Bruin, Tensas Parish, to Mrs. Thomassin Andry, New Orleans, 1861 August 10

Autograph letter signed. In English.

Haydel told his sister that he had just arrived at camp and that the troops were poorly provided for. He felt that he had been deceived in the underhanded method by which sub-officers were chosen. He mentioned the cheering and the waving of handkerchiefs that greeted the soldiers on their way to the camp, and he requested an oilcloth, seven feet by four feet, to protect him from the rain. [Haydel was a member of Watson's Battery, Louisiana Artillery. This letter and subsequent letters from Haydel were written on stationery bearing a colored engraving of the Confederate "Stars and Bars" flag with eleven stars.]

Folder 51: Special Orders Number 136 issued by John Withers, Assistant Adjutant General, Richmond, to Corporal Martin, 7th Regiment Louisiana Volunteers, no place, 1861 August 28

Document. Extract of contemporary copy. In English.

Corporal Martin of the Continental Guards was discharged from service of the Confederate States.

Folder 52: Personal letter from A.M. Conrad, Richmond, to Corporal W[illiam] H. Martin, 7th Regiment Louisiana Volunteers, no place, 1861 August 29

Autograph letter signed. In English.

Conrad enclosed a discharge for Martin so that he might return to New Orleans to assist his father in building a gunboat for the Confederates. [The discharge was part of Special Orders Number 136, 1861 August 28, q.v.]

Folder 53: Personal letter from Jefferson Davis, Richmond, Virginia, to General Joseph E[ggleston] Johnston, [Fairfax Court-House, Virginia?], 1861 September 6

Letter. Contemporary copy [in Davis' hand?]. Signed: Jeff Davis. In English.

Davis introduced and highly recommended to General Johnston a Dr. Samuel A. Cartwright, who was a physician in New Orleans and a good friend of Davis'. [Published in Rowland, Jefferson Davis, His Letters...V, 128.]

Folder 54: Official letter from C[hristopher] G[ustavus] Memminger, Secretary of the Treasury, Confederate States of America, Richmond, to Governor Thomas Overton Moore of Louisiana, New Orleans, 1861 September 11

Letter. Uncertified contemporary copy. In English.

Memminger wrote that it was necessary to the Confederate cause that treasury notes be allowed to circulate, and that it was being done everywhere except New Orleans. Therefore, in concurrence with Jefferson Davis and the Confederate Cabinet, he requested that Governor Moore urge New Orleans banks to end specie payments and to place Confederate treasury notes on equal footing with their own bank notes.

Folder 55: Official letter from C.G. Memminger, Secretary of the Treasury, Confederate States of America, Richmond, to the President and Directors of the banks of New Orleans, 1861 September 11

Letter. Uncertified contemporary copy. In English.

Memminger asked that the New Orleans banks use Confederate treasury notes as legal tender and also that they suspend specie payments. This letter was enclosed with a letter of the same date to Governor Thomas Overton Moore.

Folder 56: Personal letter from Amelius N. Haydel, Camp Johnson, near Memphis, to [Mrs. Thomassin Andry?, no place, 1861 September 22

Autograph letter signed. In English.

Haydel had been promoted to Major Sergeant of the company. They had received orders to march to Union City, Missouri. He requested money for his personal needs and complained about the bread and pork rations. Since he would be on horseback, he wished to buy a mare on credit.

Folder 57: Pay order vouchers issued by the State of Mississippi to various individuals, 1861 September 24-1863 December 14

Documents signed. Signatures as indicated below. Various sizes. In English.

The State of Mississippi issued print voucher forms to authorize payment for goods and services rendered by individual citizens to the Army of Mississippi. Each voucher gave a handwritten itemized statement of the individual's account and was signed by the Assistant Quartermaster General. The citizen acknowledged receipt of payment by also signing the form. A few of the vouchers in this group are entirely in manuscript. The vouchers are interfiled in chronological order with the other papers of the National Period. The following is an inventory of the documents:

$7.50 to N.D. Ricks, Iuka, Mississippi, for hauling fifteen loads for the 1st Brigade, Army of Mississippi /s/ A.B. Dilworth.

Folder 58: Pay order vouchers issued by the State of Mississippi to various individuals, 1861 September 24

Documents signed. Signatures as indicated below. Various sizes. In English.

The State of Mississippi issued print voucher forms to authorize payment for goods and services rendered by individual citizens to the Army of Mississippi. Each voucher gave a handwritten itemized statement of the individual's account and was signed by the Assistant Quartermaster General. The citizen acknowledged receipt of payment by also signing the form. A few of the vouchers in this group are entirely in manuscript. The vouchers are interfiled in chronological order with the other papers of the National Period. The following is an inventory of the documents:

$9.50 to James H. Doan, Iuka, Mississippi, for hauling nineteen loads of camp equipage and subsistence supplies for the 1st Brigade, Army of Mississippi /s/ A.B. Dilworth.

Folder 59: Pay order vouchers issued by the State of Mississippi to various individuals, 1861 September 25

Documents signed. Signatures as indicated below. Various sizes. In English.

The State of Mississippi issued print voucher forms to authorize payment for goods and services rendered by individual citizens to the Army of Mississippi. Each voucher gave a handwritten itemized statement of the individual's account and was signed by the Assistant Quartermaster General. The citizen acknowledged receipt of payment by also signing the form. A few of the vouchers in this group are entirely in manuscript. The vouchers are interfiled in chronological order with the other papers of the National Period. The following is an inventory of the documents:

$2 to R.D. Fielder, Iuka, Mississippi, for hauling four loads for the Confederate Guards Artillery. /s/ A.B. Dilworth.

Folder 60: Pay order vouchers issued by the State of Mississippi to various individuals, 1861 September 26

Documents signed. Signatures as indicated below. Various sizes. In English.

The State of Mississippi issued print voucher forms to authorize payment for goods and services rendered by individual citizens to the Army of Mississippi. Each voucher gave a handwritten itemized statement of the individual's account and was signed by the Assistant Quartermaster General. The citizen acknowledged receipt of payment by also signing the form. A few of the vouchers in this group are entirely in manuscript. The vouchers are interfiled in chronological order with the other papers of the National Period. The following is an inventory of the documents:

$6.50 to C.S. Severson, Iuka, Mississippi, for office supplies, telegraphing services, and hauling.

Folder 61: Pay order vouchers issued by the State of Mississippi to various individuals employed by the Army of Mississippi, 1861 September 26

Documents signed. Signatures as indicated below. 3 pp. In English.

These vouchers were issued on a printed form identical to the one used for remuneration of civilian goods and services. The forms were filled in with the necessary information concerning the position, the term of service, and pay rate. The Assistant Quartermaster General of the Army of Mississippi signed the voucher, and the individual also signed upon receipt of pay. The three vouchers are interfiled chronologically with the papers of the National period.

$93.33 to R.B. Williams, Iuka, Mississippi, for one month and twenty-six days of service as an issuing clerk at Iuka. /s/ A.B. Dilworth.

Folder 62: Pay order vouchers issued by the State of Mississippi to various individuals employed by the Army of Mississippi, 1861 September 26

Documents signed. Signatures as indicated below. 3 pp. In English.

These vouchers were issued on a printed form identical to the one used for remuneration of civilian goods and services. The forms were filled in with the necessary information concerning the position, the term of service, and pay rate. The Assistant Quartermaster General of the Army of Mississippi signed the voucher, and the individual also signed upon receipt of pay. The three vouchers are interfiled chronologically with the papers of the National period.

$250 to C.S. Severson, Iuka, Mississippi, for two months of service as Assistant Quartermaster of the Army of Mississippi at Iuka. /s/ A.B. Dilworth.

Folder 63: List of members present at meeting of the Panola Guards, New Orleans, 1861 October 2

Document. Signed: Jules Vienne, Captain. In English.

The meeting of the Panola Guards was called for the purpose of electing commissioned officers. There is a list of the forty men who were present and the nine who were absent.

Folder 64: Military commission issued by Governor Tho[mas] O[verton] Moore of Louisiana to Jules Vienne, 1861 October 5

Document signed. In English.

Governor Moore commissioned Jules Vienne of New Orleans as Captain of the Panola Guards, 1st Brigade, 1st Division of the Militia of Louisiana.

Folder 65: Personal letter from John T. Purvis, Camp Beauregard, Fairfax County, Virginia, to "Friend Bill" [William H. Martin?], no place, 1861 October 11

Autographed letter signed. In English.

Purvis, Lieutenant in Company A of the 7th Louisiana, described the activities of the army along the Potomac near Great Falls and Seneca [Creek?], Maryland. He complained of the hardships of picket duty in the cold.

Folder 66: Business letter from R.H. Turly, Fayette, Mississippi, to General James Bennett, Jackson, Mississippi, 1861 October 22

Autograph signed letter. In English.

Turly requested information concerning some boxes that he sent to the 19th Mississippi Regiment then serving in Virginia.

Folder 67: Personal letter from W.C. Bowen, Macon, Mississippi, to Madison McAfee, Jackson, Mississippi, 1861 October 23

Autograph letter signed. In English.

Bowen requested a transportation pass to rejoin his regiment, then at Bowling Green, Kentucky.

Folder 68: Letter book of the Headquarters of the Western Department of the Confederate Army, 1861 October 24-1862 April 2

Bound manuscript of letters. In English.

The letter book contains 1,257 letters and telegrams mostly by W.W. Mackall, Aide to Albert Sidney Johnston. A few were written by Johnston himself or by H.P. Brewster, Assistant Adjutant General. The letters were written from Bowling Green, Kentucky; Murfreesboro, Shelbyville, and Edgefield, Tennessee; and Decatur, Alabama. [Some of the letters have been published in The War of the Rebellion: Official Records, Series I, Volumes IV and VII.]

Folder 69: Personal letter from Amelius N. Haydel, opposite Columbus, Kentucky, to [Mrs. Thomassin Andry?], no place, 1861 October 26

Autograph letter signed. In English.

Haydel was assigned to Colonel James Tappan's Arkansas Regiment, and he expected to be moved from the command of General [Leonidas] Polk to that of General [William J.] Hardee. His health was poor. He had a daily chill and where he was once "healthy and robust," he was "now reduced to a mere skeleton with pale features and haggard eyes and a deep dark yellow complexion."

Folder 70: Military commission issued by Governor Tho[mas] O[verton] Moore of Louisiana to Jacob Levy, 1861 October 27

Document Signed. In English.

Levy was appointed Paymaster of the Caldwell Regiment.

Folder 71: Petition submitted by the Panola Guards, New Orleans, to the Militia of Louisiana, circa 1861 October

Document. Signed: "A true Copy J. Vienne." In English.

The forty-five members of the Panola Guards, whose names appeared on the document, requested the presence of a state officer at their next meeting so that he might certify the commissioned officers they had elected.

Folder 72: Public appeal for donations made by the Panola Guards, New Orleans, circa 1861 October

Document. Signed: Jules Vienne, Capt'n; J.W. Bailey, Committee Chairman. In English.

The Panola Guards, having armed and equipped themselves at their own expense, now solicited public donations in order to purchase bayonets for their shotguns.

Folder 73: List of officers and enlisted men of the Panola Guards, New Orleans, circa 1861 October

Document. Unsigned. In English.

There were sixty-six men in the Panola Guards, and the unit consisted of one captain (Jules Vienne), three lieutenants, five sergeants, four corporals, and fifty-four privates.

Folder 74: Military commission issued  by Governor Tho[mas] O[verton] Moore of Louisiana to Isaac L. Haas, 1861 November 16

Document signed. In English.

Haas was appointed 2nd Lieutenant of Company 4, Caldwell Regiment, 5th Division.

Folder 75: Pay order vouchers issued by the State of Mississippi to various individuals employed by the Army of Mississippi, 1861 December 7

Documents signed. Signatures as indicated below. 3 pp. In English.

These vouchers were issued on a printed form identical to the one used for remuneration of civilian goods and services. The forms were filled in with the necessary information concerning the position, the term of service, and pay rate. The Assistant Quartermaster General of the Army of Mississippi signed the voucher, and the individual also signed upon receipt of pay. The three vouchers are interfiled chronologically with the papers of the National period.

$45 to William B. Brown, Jackson, Mississippi, for a half month of service as clerk in the Quartermaster General's Department. /s/ Madison McAfee.

Folder 76: Receipt issued by V.L. Terrell, Quartermaster, Copiah Horse Guards, Jackson, Mississippi, to Colonel Madison McAfee, Quartermaster General of Mississippi, 1861 December 7

Document. In English.

Terrell acknowledged having received $1,457.80 from McAfee.

Folder 77: Military commission issued by Governor Tho[mas] O[verton] Moore of Louisiana to Anatole L.H. Kernion, 1861 December 11

Document signed. In English.

Kernion was appointed Captain in Company G., 4th Regiment, 2nd Brigade, 1st Division of the Militia of Louisiana to serve a five-year term, beginning 1861 November 20.

Folder 78: Pay order vouchers issued by the State of Mississippi to various individuals, 1861 December 14

Documents signed. Signatures as indicated below. Various sizes. In English.

The State of Mississippi issued print voucher forms to authorize payment for goods and services rendered by individual citizens to the Army of Mississippi. Each voucher gave a handwritten itemized statement of the individual's account and was signed by the Assistant Quartermaster General. The citizen acknowledged receipt of payment by also signing the form. A few of the vouchers in this group are entirely in manuscript. The vouchers are interfiled in chronological order with the other papers of the National Period. The following is an inventory of the documents:

$8.81 to G.P. Rice, Grenada, Mississippi, for 11 3/4 bushels of corn. /s/ R.W.T. Daniel.

Folder 79: Pay order vouchers issued by the State of Mississippi to various individuals, 1861 December 14

Documents signed. Signatures as indicated below. Various sizes. In English.

The State of Mississippi issued print voucher forms to authorize payment for goods and services rendered by individual citizens to the Army of Mississippi. Each voucher gave a handwritten itemized statement of the individual's account and was signed by the Assistant Quartermaster General. The citizen acknowledged receipt of payment by also signing the form. A few of the vouchers in this group are entirely in manuscript. The vouchers are interfiled in chronological order with the other papers of the National Period. The following is an inventory of the documents:

$157.50 to Charles D. Graham, [Grenada, Mississippi?], for sixty-three cords of wood purchased by individual soldiers. /s/ R.W.T. Daniel.

Folder 80: Pay order vouchers issued by the State of Mississippi to various individuals, 1861 December 16

Documents signed. Signatures as indicated below. Various sizes. In English.

The State of Mississippi issued print voucher forms to authorize payment for goods and services rendered by individual citizens to the Army of Mississippi. Each voucher gave a handwritten itemized statement of the individual's account and was signed by the Assistant Quartermaster General. The citizen acknowledged receipt of payment by also signing the form. A few of the vouchers in this group are entirely in manuscript. The vouchers are interfiled in chronological order with the other papers of the National Period. The following is an inventory of the documents:

$27.50 to Charles D. Graham, Grenada, Mississippi, for eleven cords of wood purchased by individual soldiers. /s/ R.W.T. Daniel.

Folder 81: Pay order vouchers issued by the State of Mississippi to various individuals, 1861 December 18

Documents signed. Signatures as indicated below. Various sizes. In English.

The State of Mississippi issued print voucher forms to authorize payment for goods and services rendered by individual citizens to the Army of Mississippi. Each voucher gave a handwritten itemized statement of the individual's account and was signed by the Assistant Quartermaster General. The citizen acknowledged receipt of payment by also signing the form. A few of the vouchers in this group are entirely in manuscript. The vouchers are interfiled in chronological order with the other papers of the National Period. The following is an inventory of the documents:

$47 to R. Coffman, Grenada, Mississippi, for hauling done for individual officers. /s/ R.W.T. Daniel.

Folder 82: Personal letter from A[chile] Chiapella, [President, Union Insurance Company], New Orleans, to George Ulrich, Bayou Courtableau, 1861 December 20

Autograph letter signed. In French.

Chiapella wrote Ulrich in regard to the slave that the latter had left in New Orleans to be sold. [Gabriel] DeFeriet, [auctioneer], had been unable to sell the man for the price Ulrich had specified, because the sugar and cotton planters had not yet come to the city. Chiapella expressed hope that the latest news would restore confidence and facilitate the sale of slaves. In a postscript Chiapella informed Ulrich that he had renewed the insurance policy on furniture.

Folder 83: Résumé of the military career of A[natole] L.H. Kernion of New Orleans during the Civil War, 1861-1865

Manuscripts. Undated; unsigned. In English.

The manuscript gave a summary of Kernion's services in the Confederate Army.

Folder 84: Poem written by Lieutenant Charles E. McCarthy, entitled "Private in the Ranks", circa 1861-1865?

Manuscript. Copied and signed in the [1880s?] by John M. Coos. In English.

[Both McCarthy and Coos served in the 30th Louisiana Volunteers, and both were also prisoners at Johnson's Island, Ohio, in late 1864 and early 1865.]

Box 12: National period, 1862
Folder 1: Personal letter from A[chille] Chiapella, New Orleans, to Captain [George Ulrich], no place, 1862 January 2

Autograph letter signed. In French.

Chiapella wrote to inform Ulrich that the latter's slave had been sold for $800 net cash. He asked Ulrich to send him the title to the slave, together with a certificate from the Parish Recorder that there were no mortgages recorded against the slave.

Folder 2: Pay order vouchers issued by the State of Mississippi to various individuals, 1862 January 11

Documents signed. Signatures as indicated below. Various sizes. In English.

The State of Mississippi issued print voucher forms to authorize payment for goods and services rendered by individual citizens to the Army of Mississippi. Each voucher gave a handwritten itemized statement of the individual's account and was signed by the Assistant Quartermaster General. The citizen acknowledged receipt of payment by also signing the form. A few of the vouchers in this group are entirely in manuscript. The vouchers are interfiled in chronological order with the other papers of the National Period. The following is an inventory of the documents:

$ 20.30 to A.J. Goodloe, Union City, Tennessee, for twenty-nine bushels of cornmeal. /s/ R.W.T.  Daniel.

Folder 3: Pay order vouchers issued by the State of Mississippi to various individuals, 1862 January 17

Documents signed. Signatures as indicated below. Various sizes. In English.

The State of Mississippi issued print voucher forms to authorize payment for goods and services rendered by individual citizens to the Army of Mississippi. Each voucher gave a handwritten itemized statement of the individual's account and was signed by the Assistant Quartermaster General. The citizen acknowledged receipt of payment by also signing the form. A few of the vouchers in this group are entirely in manuscript. The vouchers are interfiled in chronological order with the other papers of the National Period. The following is an inventory of the documents:

$3 to H.N. Bingham, Grenada, Mississippi, for hauling. /s/ R.W.T. Daniel.

Folder 4: Pay order vouchers issued by the State of Mississippi to various individuals, 1862 January 17

Documents signed. Signatures as indicated below. Various sizes. In English.

The State of Mississippi issued print voucher forms to authorize payment for goods and services rendered by individual citizens to the Army of Mississippi. Each voucher gave a handwritten itemized statement of the individual's account and was signed by the Assistant Quartermaster General. The citizen acknowledged receipt of payment by also signing the form. A few of the vouchers in this group are entirely in manuscript. The vouchers are interfiled in chronological order with the other papers of the National Period. The following is an inventory of the documents:

$23.50 to Thomas G. Delvach, Grenada, Mississippi, for hauling. /s/ R.W.T. Daniel.

Folder 5: Pay order vouchers issued by the State of Mississippi to various individuals, 1862 January 17

Documents signed. Signatures as indicated below. Various sizes. In English.

The State of Mississippi issued print voucher forms to authorize payment for goods and services rendered by individual citizens to the Army of Mississippi. Each voucher gave a handwritten itemized statement of the individual's account and was signed by the Assistant Quartermaster General. The citizen acknowledged receipt of payment by also signing the form. A few of the vouchers in this group are entirely in manuscript. The vouchers are interfiled in chronological order with the other papers of the National Period. The following is an inventory of the documents:

$34.50 to J.M. Goodwin, Grenada, Mississippi, for hauling. /s/ R.W.T. Daniel.

Folder 6: Pay order vouchers issued by the State of Mississippi to various individuals, 1862 January 17

Documents signed. Signatures as indicated below. Various sizes. In English.

The State of Mississippi issued print voucher forms to authorize payment for goods and services rendered by individual citizens to the Army of Mississippi. Each voucher gave a handwritten itemized statement of the individual's account and was signed by the Assistant Quartermaster General. The citizen acknowledged receipt of payment by also signing the form. A few of the vouchers in this group are entirely in manuscript. The vouchers are interfiled in chronological order with the other papers of the National Period. The following is an inventory of the documents:

$29.50 to J.M. Goodwin, Grenada, Mississippi, for hauling. /s/ R.W.T. Daniel.

Folder 7: Pay order vouchers issued by the State of Mississippi to various individuals, 1862 January 17

Documents signed. Signatures as indicated below. Various sizes. In English.

The State of Mississippi issued print voucher forms to authorize payment for goods and services rendered by individual citizens to the Army of Mississippi. Each voucher gave a handwritten itemized statement of the individual's account and was signed by the Assistant Quartermaster General. The citizen acknowledged receipt of payment by also signing the form. A few of the vouchers in this group are entirely in manuscript. The vouchers are interfiled in chronological order with the other papers of the National Period. The following is an inventory of the documents:

$19.45 to Robert Stevenson, Grenada, Mississippi, for shoeing the horses of various individuals. /s/ R.W.T. Daniel.

Folder 8: Pay order vouchers issued by the State of Mississippi to various individuals, 1862 January 17

Documents signed. Signatures as indicated below. Various sizes. In English.

The State of Mississippi issued print voucher forms to authorize payment for goods and services rendered by individual citizens to the Army of Mississippi. Each voucher gave a handwritten itemized statement of the individual's account and was signed by the Assistant Quartermaster General. The citizen acknowledged receipt of payment by also signing the form. A few of the vouchers in this group are entirely in manuscript. The vouchers are interfiled in chronological order with the other papers of the National Period. The following is an inventory of the documents:

$21.25 to E.F. Moody, Grenada, Mississippi, for miscellaneous hardware items. /s/ R.W.T. Daniel.

Folder 9: Pay order vouchers issued by the State of Mississippi to various individuals, 1862 January 17

Documents signed. Signatures as indicated below. Various sizes. In English.

The State of Mississippi issued print voucher forms to authorize payment for goods and services rendered by individual citizens to the Army of Mississippi. Each voucher gave a handwritten itemized statement of the individual's account and was signed by the Assistant Quartermaster General. The citizen acknowledged receipt of payment by also signing the form. A few of the vouchers in this group are entirely in manuscript. The vouchers are interfiled in chronological order with the other papers of the National Period. The following is an inventory of the documents:

$15 to Mrs. G.B. Land, Grenada, Mississippi, for [washing?] done for various soldiers. /s/ R.W.T. Daniel.

Folder 10: Pay order vouchers issued by the State of Mississippi to various individuals, 1862 January 17

Documents signed. Signatures as indicated below. Various sizes. In English.

The State of Mississippi issued print voucher forms to authorize payment for goods and services rendered by individual citizens to the Army of Mississippi. Each voucher gave a handwritten itemized statement of the individual's account and was signed by the Assistant Quartermaster General. The citizen acknowledged receipt of payment by also signing the form. A few of the vouchers in this group are entirely in manuscript. The vouchers are interfiled in chronological order with the other papers of the National Period. The following is an inventory of the documents:

$19.75 to Mrs. G.B. Land, Grenada, Mississippi, for [washing?] done for various soldiers. /s/ R.W.T. Daniel.

Folder 11: List of clothing and equipment transferred by Colonel P.O. Tricou, Quartermaster General Louisiana Army, to Captain Jules Vienne, Company D, Crescent Regiment Quartermaster at New Orleans, 1862 January 21

Document signed. In English.

The list gave the quantity, value, and condition of the various articles transferred.

Folder 12: Pay order vouchers issued by the State of Mississippi to various individuals, 1862 January

Documents signed. Signatures as indicated below. Various sizes. In English.

The State of Mississippi issued print voucher forms to authorize payment for goods and services rendered by individual citizens to the Army of Mississippi. Each voucher gave a handwritten itemized statement of the individual's account and was signed by the Assistant Quartermaster General. The citizen acknowledged receipt of payment by also signing the form. A few of the vouchers in this group are entirely in manuscript. The vouchers are interfiled in chronological order with the other papers of the National Period. The following is an inventory of the documents:

$2.75 to W.W. Teague, Grenada, Mississippi, for seven empty barrels. /s/ R.W.T. Daniel.

Folder 13: Pay order vouchers issued by the State of Mississippi to various individuals, 1862 February

Documents signed. Signatures as indicated below. Various sizes. In English.

The State of Mississippi issued print voucher forms to authorize payment for goods and services rendered by individual citizens to the Army of Mississippi. Each voucher gave a handwritten itemized statement of the individual's account and was signed by the Assistant Quartermaster General. The citizen acknowledged receipt of payment by also signing the form. A few of the vouchers in this group are entirely in manuscript. The vouchers are interfiled in chronological order with the other papers of the National Period. The following is an inventory of the documents:

$41.50 to William R. Hodges, M.D., for medical services rendered R.M. Magee and W.W. Magee. /s/ R.W.T. Daniel.

Folder 14: Official letter from W[illiam] T[ecumseh] Sherman, Headquarters, Paducah, [Kentucky], to Captain [Gilbert A.] Pierce, Assistant Quartermaster, no place, 1862 February 18

Autograph letter signed. In English.

[Sherman took command of the Military District of Cairo on 1862 February 14. On March 1 he took command of the 5th Division, Army of the Tennessee. This letter and five others written by Sherman in 1862 February, just after Grant's victories at Forts Henry and Donelson, were not published in The War of the Rebellion: Official Records.] The letter concerned steamer traffic on the river system and the transport of fuel and supplies.

Folder 15: Official letter from William Tecumseh Sherman, Headquarters, Paducah, Kentucky, to Captain [Gilbert A.] Pierce, no place, 1862 February 19

Autograph letter signed. In English.

The letter read, "Hurry the unloading of the 'Saline' and report to me the earliest possible moment when she can be ready for Fort Henry."

Folder 16: Official letter from William Tecumseh Sherman, Headquarters, Paducah, Kentucky, to Captain [Gilbert A.] Pierce, no place, 1862 February 20

Autograph letter signed. In English.

Sherman wrote, "If you can it would be economy to load the Champion here and send her back. If you cannot spare the corn, send her forthright to Cairo for supply."

Folder 17: Official letter from William Tecumseh Sherman, Headquarters, District of Cairo, Paducah, Kentucky, to Captain [Gilbert A.] Pierce, no place, 1862 February 21

Autograph letter signed. In English.

Sherman informed Pierce that he had "assigned the ground and stables formerly occupied by the Light Artillery to Captain Cochrans Battery...You may take possession of any stables in town for your teams."

Folder 18: Official letter from William Tecumseh Sherman, Headquarters, District of Cairo, Paducah, Kentucky, to Dr. J.H. Hollister, volunteer physician, no place, 1862 February 22

Autograph letter signed. In English.

Sherman instructed Dr. Hollister to take two boats to pick up the sick and wounded in Mound City [Illinois?]. He was to be assisted by four other physicians, by the Reverend Bushnell, by six ladies from Louisville, and by male nurses chosen from volunteer citizens.

Folder 19: Official letter from William Tecumseh Sherman, Headquarters, District of Cairo, Paducah, Kentucky, to Captain G[ilbert] A. Pierce, no place, 1862 February 27

Autograph letter signed. In English.

Sherman ordered Pierce to allow the Tigress to go up the Cumberland to General Grant. The Chancellor was to discharge the corn and other supplies at Smithland and return to Paducah.

Folder 20: Official letter from William Tecumseh Sherman, Headquarters, District of Cairo, Paducah, Kentucky, to Captain G[ilbert] A. Pierce, no place, 1862 March 2

Autograph letter signed. In English.

Pierce was to ship 800 boxes of musket cartridges on one of the transports bound up the Tennessee. In the lower left-hand corner is a note, in another hand, "on Champion Number 3."

Folder 21: Military commission issued by Governor Tho[mas] O[verton] Moore of Louisiana to Anatole L.H. Kernion, 1862 March 3

Document signed. In English.

Kernion was appointed Captain of Company F, 4th Regiment, 2nd Brigade of the Militia of Louisiana.

Folder 22: Certificate of mortgage existing against the property of John J. Shaffer in favor of Robert R. Barrow, 1862 March 3

Document. Signed: A.Z. Delaporte, Recorder of Mortgages, Terrebonne Parish. In English.

The Recorder of Mortgages, Terrebonne Parish, certified that a mortgage in the amount of $33,687 existed against a sugar plantation, property of John J. Shaffer, situated on Bayou Chickaoula [Chicahoula?] and comprising 1,122 acres. The mortgage, recorded in 1858, was in favor of Robert R. Barrow.

Folder 23: Certificate issued by J.H. Townsend, New Orleans, to W[illiam] H. Martin, no place, 1862 March 4

Document signed. In English.

Townsend certified that Martin worked for him "on the Confederate State Steamers for river defense." Across the printed voucher is written, "Exempt from militia duty."

Folder 24: Certificate of Oath of Allegiance to the Confederate States of America taken by A[natole] L.H. Kernion, New Orleans, 1862 March 20

Document. Signed: M.B. DuBuisson, Assistant Provost Marshal. In English.

The Confederate Provost Marshal, Third District, New Orleans, certified that Kernion had taken his Oath of Allegiance to the Confederate States.

Folder 25: Official letter from C.G. Memminger, Treasury department, Confederate States of America, Richmond, to Governor Thomas O. Moore of Louisiana, no place, 1862 April 8

Letter. Uncertified contemporary copy. In English.

Memminger told Moore that it would be highly injurious to the Confederate cause if the New Orleans banks resumed specie payments. Therefore, President Jefferson Davis would not permit it.

Folder 26: Personal letter from E.C. Haydel, Corinth, Mississippi, to his sister, [New Orleans], 1862 April 13

Autograph letter signed. In English.

Haydel had met with Amelius [Haydel], who had taken the stationery upon which this letter was written [with the blue shield of Ohio in the upper right-hand corner], along with other personal effects, from a Union camp following the battle at Shiloh. General Beauregard predicted that there would be no more fighting for two weeks. [The Corinth campaign began April 29.]

Folder 27: Official letter from Governor Tho[mas] O[verton] Moore, New Orleans, to R.M. Davis and J[ean] M[artial] Lapeyre, New Orleans, 1862 April 15

Letter. Uncertified contemporary copy. In English.

Moore informed Davis, President of the Bank of Louisiana, and Lapeyre, President of the Louisiana State Bank, that President Jefferson Davis had denied their request to resume specie payments.

Folder 28: Official letter from Governor Tho[mas] O[verton] Moore, New Orleans, to the presidents of the banks of New Orleans, 1862 April 23

Letter signed. In English.

Moore enclosed a letter from Confederate Secretary of the Treasury Memminger, who had refused to allow the New Orleans banks to resume specie payments. [See letter 1862 April 8.] He also wrote that he had heard that several banks were making specie payments and wished to know if the banks intended to follow government policy or not.

Folder 29: Receipt issued to H. St. Amant, New Orleans, 1862 May 8

Document. Unsigned. In English.

The writer, unidentified, received 1 1/2 [unit of measure not given] bacon from H. St. Amant.

Folder 30: Parole issued to 1st Lieutenant H[enry] W. Fowler, New Orleans, by George C. Strong, Assistant Adjutant General, Headquarters, Department of the Gulf, New Orleans, 1862 May 9

Document signed. In English.

By orders of Major General [Benjamin Franklin] Butler, Lieutenant Fowler of the Louisiana Regiment of Artillery, Confederate Army, a prisoner of war, now paroled, was permitted to pass the lines of the Union forces.

Folder 31: Statement of P[eter] B. Starke and W[illiam] L. Nugent, Jackson Post, [Jackson, Mississippi], 1862 May 18

Document. Uncertified contemporary copy. In English.

Starke stated that he had seized ten kegs, each containing $50,000 in gold coin, and that he had turned the money over to Confederate agent F[rank] H. Hatch. [The shipment of gold coin belonged to the Canal Bank of New Orleans and was seized by Colonel Starke of the 28th Mississippi Cavalry. This was one of several shipments of gold coin captured in the Confederacy from New Orleans banks.]

Folder 32: Official letter from C.G. Memminger, Richmond, to Messrs. Wood and Brother, agents for the banks of New Orleans, 1862 June 5

Letter. Uncertified contemporary copy. In English.

The Confederate Secretary of the Treasury wrote that the funds of the banks of New Orleans had been seized to prevent them from falling into enemy hands and that the banks could operate in the Confederacy using the specie, now in the hands of the government, as reserves.

Folder 33: Land patent of swamplands purchased by John G. Wilson in Avoyelles Parish, 1862 June 16

Document. Signed: Tho. O. Moore, Governor, Louisiana. In English.

The Governor of the State of Louisiana certified that John G. Wilson had purchased from the State and received title of 320 acres of swamplands in Section 12, Township 2, S.R. 2 East in the South Western District of Louisiana.

Folder 34: Official letter from Geo[rge] F. Shepley, Military Command of New Orleans, to Officers and Soldiers of the United States Army, no place, 1862 June 24

Letter signed. In English.

Shepley granted a pass to W[illiam] H. Martin, a paroled prisoner of war, to pass through the Union lines. He was permitted to carry his clothing, a dirk, and a revolver, but was forbidden to carry any letters, information, or contraband.

Folder 35: Personal letter from John A. Buckner, Jackson, Mississippi, to Jefferson Davis, no place, 1862 August 25

Autograph letter signed. In English.

Buckner relayed a message from Confederate General Charles Clark that, contrary to rumors Davis may have heard, Clark had "not been intoxicated since the war began" and this "as the last words of a dying man." Buckner continued to praise the ability and probity of Clark, who had been wounded at Shiloh and at Baton Rouge. Buckner's letter is followed by a note written and initialed by Jefferson Davis. In it Davis said that he regretted that Clark had "been under the painful impression that he was under such misrepresentation deprived of my confidence - no charges of the kind referred to have reached me." [Not in Rowland, Jefferson Davis, His Letters...]

Folder 36: List of arms lost or destroyed in the battle at Richmond, Kentucky, by Company A, 95th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 1862 August 30

Document. Signed: J.M. Stuart, Captain; Isaac B. Potts, 1st Lieutenant; James C. Calvert, Orderly Sergeant. In English.

Captain J.M. Stuart listed the arms and accoutrements that his company (Company A, 95th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry) had lost in the battle at Richmond, Kentucky. The enemy had captured sixty-seven of his men in the engagement. Lieutenant Isaac B. Potts and Sergeant James C. Calvert attested that Captain Stuart's statement was correct.

Folder 37: Certificate issued by the United States Provost Marshal's Office, New Orleans, to A[natole] L.H. Kernion, no place, 1862 October 3

Document. In English.

The Provost Marshal's Office certified that Kernion, an enemy of the United States, had rendered a statement of his property in accordance with General Orders Number 76.

Folder 38: Certificate issued by United States Provost Marshal's Office, New Orleans, to Charles Girault, no place, 1862 October 4

Document. In English.

This printed document certified that the person whose name was written in was an enemy of the United States and had rendered a statement of his property in accordance with General Orders Number 76.

Folder 39: Business letter from Robert Jump, representing J.W. Zacharie and Company, [commission merchants], New Orleans, to Charles Stillman, Matamoros, [Mexico], 1862 October 8

Autograph letter signed. In English.

Jump introduced William H. Martin, who was seeking employment as a ship carpenter in Matamoros.

Folder 40: Personal letter from Lyman Harding, "Plantation," [Saint Mary Parish?], to Lieutenant Edward Palfrey, Vicksburg, Mississippi, 1862 October 25

Autograph letter signed. In English.

Harding spoke of the times when he and Palfrey sat before the fire, drank whiskey, and told naughty stories. Harding had been drilling "infernal stupid gascon [Arcadian] scoundrels" at Camp Pratt, but had returned home on account of illness. He was critical of the slowness of the defensive efforts, remarking, "everything seems to move with a lazy indolent torpid motion that betokens a sad want of energy or a lamentable lack of means." He also mentioned the status of the sugar crop, gave news of acquaintances, and commented that, since his overseer had been drafted, "the Negroes consequently have had everything pretty much their own way."

Folder 41: Pay vouchers issued by the State of Mississippi to officers of the 1st Brigade, Mississippi State Troops, 1862 December 1

Documents. Signed by J. Moore, Quartermaster, and by the individual officers. In English.

The State of Mississippi used these printed forms as payment authorizations for its soldiers. Each voucher was filled with the term of service, the pay rate per month, and the amount of pay issued. The Quartermaster signed the voucher when he issued pay, and the officer signed as an acknowledgment that he had received the correct amount. Salaries ranged from $80 per month for a Junior Lieutenant to $195 per month for a Colonel. The vouchers are filed in chronological order with other documents of the National Period. The following is an inventory of the documents:

$80 to Henry S. Trenolla for one of service as 3rd Lieutenant, 4th Regiment.

Folder 42: Pay order vouchers issued by the State of Mississippi to various individuals, 1862 December 17

Documents signed. Signatures as indicated below. Various sizes. In English.

The State of Mississippi issued print voucher forms to authorize payment for goods and services rendered by individual citizens to the Army of Mississippi. Each voucher gave a handwritten itemized statement of the individual's account and was signed by the Assistant Quartermaster General. The citizen acknowledged receipt of payment by also signing the form. A few of the vouchers in this group are entirely in manuscript. The vouchers are interfiled in chronological order with the other papers of the National Period. The following is an inventory of the documents:

$54 to G.W. Humphries, Grenada, Mississippi, for beef. /s/ J. Moore.

Folder 43: Pay order vouchers issued by the State of Mississippi to various individuals, 1862 December 18

Documents signed. Signatures as indicated below. Various sizes. In English.

The State of Mississippi issued print voucher forms to authorize payment for goods and services rendered by individual citizens to the Army of Mississippi. Each voucher gave a handwritten itemized statement of the individual's account and was signed by the Assistant Quartermaster General. The citizen acknowledged receipt of payment by also signing the form. A few of the vouchers in this group are entirely in manuscript. The vouchers are interfiled in chronological order with the other papers of the National Period. The following is an inventory of the documents:

$730.20 to A.J. Boon, Grenada, Mississippi, for fresh beef and pork. /s/ J. Moore.

Folder 44: Woodcutting contract between L.F. DeGruy and the New Orleans Canal and Banking Company, New Orleans, 1862 December 18

Document signed. Countersigned: H.A. Rathbone, President, New Orleans Canal and Banking Company. In English.

The New Orleans Canal and Banking Company granted DeGruy the privilege of cutting up to 500 cords of firewood from the company land, situated on the south side of the New Canal and extending from Metairie Ridge to the shore of Lake Pontchartrain. DeGruy was not to cut live oaks, cypresses, or other timber trees, but he could cut willows, maples, and ashes. He would pay the company two dollars for each cord of firewood cut and six dollars for every thousand hoop poles cut.

Folder 45: Order issued by L. Haughton, Brigade Inspector, by order of Brigadier General Harris, Headquarters 4th Brigade, Mississippi State Troops, Columbus, Mississippi, to Major Love, no place, 1862 December 20

Document signed. In English.

General Harris ordered Major Love to furnish transportation for three men who would be traveling from Columbus to Artesia.

Folder 46: Pay order vouchers issued by the State of Mississippi to various individuals, 1862 December 26

Documents signed. Signatures as indicated below. Various sizes. In English.

The State of Mississippi issued print voucher forms to authorize payment for goods and services rendered by individual citizens to the Army of Mississippi. Each voucher gave a handwritten itemized statement of the individual's account and was signed by the Assistant Quartermaster General. The citizen acknowledged receipt of payment by also signing the form. A few of the vouchers in this group are entirely in manuscript. The vouchers are interfiled in chronological order with the other papers of the National Period. The following is an inventory of the documents:

$715.70 to A.J. Boon, Grenada, Mississippi, for 7,157 pounds of fresh beef. /s/ J. Moore.

Folder 47: Requisition for salt for public animals of the 4th Regiment, Mississippi State Troops, no place, 1862 December 26

Document. Signed. J. Moore. In English.

Moore requested four pounds of salt for the Brigade Quartermaster to use for the 4th Regiment's mules.

Folder 48: Special provision return submitted by Captain E.B. Hallowell, Company L, 4th Regiment, Mississippi State Troops, Grenada, Mississippi, 1862 December 27-1863 January 1

Document. Signed: W.S. Logan for E.B. Hallowell. In English.

There are two copies of the document on the same page. The return provided for rations of meal, sugar, rice, salt, soap, and beef for twenty-four men for five days.

Folder 49: Pay vouchers issued by the State of Mississippi to officers of the 1st Brigade, Mississippi State Troops, 1862 December 29

Documents. Signed by J. Moore, Quartermaster, and by the individual officers. In English.

The State of Mississippi used these printed forms as payment authorizations for its soldiers. Each voucher was filled with the term of service, the pay rate per month, and the amount of pay issued. The Quartermaster signed the voucher when he issued pay, and the officer signed as an acknowledgment that he had received the correct amount. Salaries ranged from $80 per month for a Junior Lieutenant to $195 per month for a Colonel. The vouchers are filed in chronological order with other documents of the National Period. The following is an inventory of the documents:

$195 to W.J. Owens for one month of service as Colonel, 3rd Regiment.

Folder 50: Order issued by L. Haughton, Brigade Inspector, Headquarters 4th Brigade, Mississippi State Troops, Columbus, Mississippi, to Major Love, no place, 1862 December 29

Document signed. In English.

Haughton ordered Love to transport 389 men and their equipment from Egypt, Mississippi, to Meridian.

Folder 51: Pay vouchers issued by the State of Mississippi to officers of the 1st Brigade, Mississippi State Troops, 1862 December 30

Documents. Signed by J. Moore, Quartermaster, and by the individual officers. In English.

The State of Mississippi used these printed forms as payment authorizations for its soldiers. Each voucher was filled with the term of service, the pay rate per month, and the amount of pay issued. The Quartermaster signed the voucher when he issued pay, and the officer signed as an acknowledgment that he had received the correct amount. Salaries ranged from $80 per month for a Junior Lieutenant to $195 per month for a Colonel. The vouchers are filed in chronological order with other documents of the National Period. The following is an inventory of the documents:

$194.66 to G.W. Clark for two months and thirteen days of service as 2nd Lieutenant, 4th Regiment.

Folder 52: Pay vouchers issued by the State of Mississippi to officers of the 1st Brigade, Mississippi State Troops, 1862 December 30

Documents. Signed by J. Moore, Quartermaster, and by the individual officers. In English.

The State of Mississippi used these printed forms as payment authorizations for its soldiers. Each voucher was filled with the term of service, the pay rate per month, and the amount of pay issued. The Quartermaster signed the voucher when he issued pay, and the officer signed as an acknowledgment that he had received the correct amount. Salaries ranged from $80 per month for a Junior Lieutenant to $195 per month for a Colonel. The vouchers are filed in chronological order with other documents of the National Period. The following is an inventory of the documents:

$90 to T.L. Stevens for one month of service as 1st Lieutenant, 3rd Regiment.

Folder 53: Pay vouchers issued by the State of Mississippi to officers of the 1st Brigade, Mississippi State Troops, 1862 December 30

Documents. Signed by J. Moore, Quartermaster, and by the individual officers. In English.

The State of Mississippi used these printed forms as payment authorizations for its soldiers. Each voucher was filled with the term of service, the pay rate per month, and the amount of pay issued. The Quartermaster signed the voucher when he issued pay, and the officer signed as an acknowledgment that he had received the correct amount. Salaries ranged from $80 per month for a Junior Lieutenant to $195 per month for a Colonel. The vouchers are filed in chronological order with other documents of the National Period. The following is an inventory of the documents:

$80 to W.A. Wilson for one month of service as 2nd Lieutenant, 3rd Regiment.

Folder 54: Statement of accounts of Leonard B. Lipsey, with the [Army of Mississippi?], no place, 1862 December 30

Document signed. In English.

Lipsey acknowledged receipt of $39.44 from J. Moore, Quartermaster, for two months, nine days of service and for commutation of clothing

Folder 55: Pay order vouchers issued by the State of Mississippi to various individuals, 1862 December 31

Documents signed. Signatures as indicated below. Various sizes. In English.

The State of Mississippi issued print voucher forms to authorize payment for goods and services rendered by individual citizens to the Army of Mississippi. Each voucher gave a handwritten itemized statement of the individual's account and was signed by the Assistant Quartermaster General. The citizen acknowledged receipt of payment by also signing the form. A few of the vouchers in this group are entirely in manuscript. The vouchers are interfiled in chronological order with the other papers of the National Period. The following is an inventory of the documents:

$401.50 to A.J. Boon, Grenada, Mississippi, for 4,015 pounds of fresh beef. /s/ J. Moore.

Folder 56: Pay vouchers issued by the State of Mississippi to officers of the 1st Brigade, Mississippi State Troops, 1862 December 31

Documents. Signed by J. Moore, Quartermaster, and by the individual officers. In English.

The State of Mississippi used these printed forms as payment authorizations for its soldiers. Each voucher was filled with the term of service, the pay rate per month, and the amount of pay issued. The Quartermaster signed the voucher when he issued pay, and the officer signed as an acknowledgment that he had received the correct amount. Salaries ranged from $80 per month for a Junior Lieutenant to $195 per month for a Colonel. The vouchers are filed in chronological order with other documents of the National Period. The following is an inventory of the documents:

$80 to C.W. Bryant for one month of service as 2nd Lieutenant, 1st Regiment.

Folder 57: Pay vouchers issued by the State of Mississippi to officers of the 1st Brigade, Mississippi State Troops, 1862 December 31

Documents. Signed by J. Moore, Quartermaster, and by the individual officers. In English.

The State of Mississippi used these printed forms as payment authorizations for its soldiers. Each voucher was filled with the term of service, the pay rate per month, and the amount of pay issued. The Quartermaster signed the voucher when he issued pay, and the officer signed as an acknowledgment that he had received the correct amount. Salaries ranged from $80 per month for a Junior Lieutenant to $195 per month for a Colonel. The vouchers are filed in chronological order with other documents of the National Period. The following is an inventory of the documents:

$80 to J.H. Ellis for one month of service as 2nd Lieutenant, 3rd Regiment.

Folder 58: Pay vouchers issued by the State of Mississippi to officers of the 1st Brigade, Mississippi State Troops, 1862 December 31

Documents. Signed by J. Moore, Quartermaster, and by the individual officers. In English.

The State of Mississippi used these printed forms as payment authorizations for its soldiers. Each voucher was filled with the term of service, the pay rate per month, and the amount of pay issued. The Quartermaster signed the voucher when he issued pay, and the officer signed as an acknowledgment that he had received the correct amount. Salaries ranged from $80 per month for a Junior Lieutenant to $195 per month for a Colonel. The vouchers are filed in chronological order with other documents of the National Period. The following is an inventory of the documents:

$130 to A.H. Lamar for one month of service as Captain, 1st Regiment.

Folder 59: Pay vouchers issued by the State of Mississippi to officers of the 1st Brigade, Mississippi State Troops, 1862 December 31

Documents. Signed by J. Moore, Quartermaster, and by the individual officers. In English.

The State of Mississippi used these printed forms as payment authorizations for its soldiers. Each voucher was filled with the term of service, the pay rate per month, and the amount of pay issued. The Quartermaster signed the voucher when he issued pay, and the officer signed as an acknowledgment that he had received the correct amount. Salaries ranged from $80 per month for a Junior Lieutenant to $195 per month for a Colonel. The vouchers are filed in chronological order with other documents of the National Period. The following is an inventory of the documents:

$90 to William G. Raines for one month of service as 1st Lieutenant, 1st Regiment.

Folder 60: Order issued by Brigadier General Harris, [Mississippi State Troops], no place, 1862 December 31

Document. Uncertified contemporary copy. In English.

The unnamed recipient of the order was to furnish transportation for two men traveling from Columbus, Mississippi, to Vicksburg.

Folder 61: Quarterly return of Quartermaster stores, Grenada, Mississippi, submitted by J. Moore, Quartermaster, 1862 December 31

Document signed. In English.

Moore reported all property (including forage, wood, stationery, riding gear, wagons, and tents), which came through his department for the quarter ending 1862 December 31.

Folder 62: Statement of accounts of J. Moore, Quartermaster, Mississippi State Troops, Grenada, Mississippi, with the State of Mississippi, 1862 December 31

Document signed. In English.

Moore rendered an account of all public funds received and disbursed by him, including monies spent to pay officers and men through 1862 December 1.

Folder 63: Report of provisions issued for the month of December to the Mississippi State Troops, Grenada, Mississippi, by J. Moore, Assistant Commissary of Subsistence, 1862 December

Document. In English.

This provision return listed the name of the companies or regiments, the number of men, dates and terms provided for, and the type and amount of food rations issued.

Folder 64: Record of provisions distributed during the month of December, [Mississippi?], circa 1862 December

Document. Unsigned. In English.

The tallies in the report showed the amounts of beef, pork, meal, and other foodstuffs distributed to the 3rd Regiment, the 4th Regiment, Weatherstall's Company, Dunn's Company, the wagoners, and the hospital.

Folder 65: Certificate of allegiance of Mrs. M.J. Martin [Algiers, Louisiana], 1862

Document. Signed: Charles B. Child, Provost Marshal, Algiers. In English.

The document certified that Mrs. Martin had subscribed to the Oath of Allegiance as required by General Orders Number 41.

Folder 66: Oath of allegiance of W[illiam] Henry Martin, Algiers, Louisiana, 1862

Document signed. In English.

The Sixth Justice's Court in Algiers issued this printed form, which Martin signed, thereby swearing his allegiance to the United States.

Folder 67: Envelope addressed to Captain A[natole] L. [H.] Kernion, Company A, 4th Regiment, 2nd Brigade, 1st Division Louisiana Militia, no place, circa 1862-1865
Document. In English.
Folder 68: Account book of an unidentified individual [Louisiana], 1862-1866

Bound manuscript. 101 filled pages. In English.

This financial record book listed proceeds from sales of cotton and sugar, accounts held with various individuals, stocks and bonds, annuity funds, and household expenses. Occasionally an entry was made concerning funds for articles taken by the Federal troops from the Attakapas Estate.

Box 13: National period, 1863-1865
Folder 1: Forage requisitions submitted by Lieutenant W.L.D. White and Quartermaster John Dunning, Grenada, Mississippi, to J. Moore, Quartermaster, [Mississippi State Troops], 1863 January 1

Documents signed. Various sizes. In English.

The State of Mississippi provided printed forms so that officers could request forage for company horses from the Quartermaster. Each form was filled in with necessary information, including the number of horses or animals for which forage was requested, the name of the company and its commanding officer, the term for which the forage was needed, the daily allowance of various grains in pounds to each animal, and the total grain allowance. The form was signed by the commanding officer, once to certify the requisition, and again to acknowledge receipt of forage from the Quartermaster. These requisitions are interfiled in chronological order with the other papers of the National Period.

3,720 pounds of corn, 4,340 pounds of fodder requested by Lieutenant W.L.D. White for ten public horses for thirty-one days in Captain [J.B.] Dennis' Company of Mississippi Rangers.

Folder 2: Diary of an unidentified Union sailor on a Navy vessel on the Mississippi River, 1863 January 1-May 31

Bound manuscript. In English.

The young seaman, age twenty-two, was stationed on a riverboat that operated out of Cairo, Illinois, and served as a tender for the gunboats of the river fleet. He mentioned activities in Cairo, trips down the river to Vicksburg and Memphis, daily work, and evenings spent at the theatre, churches, or billiard parlors. The boat transported coal, general cargo, and mail to the fleet, and occasionally took on contraband cotton.

Folder 3: Forage requisitions submitted by Lieutenant W.L.D. White and Quartermaster John Dunning, Grenada, Mississippi, to J. Moore, Quartermaster, [Mississippi State Troops], 1863 January 15

Documents signed. Various sizes. In English.

The State of Mississippi provided printed forms so that officers could request forage for company horses from the Quartermaster. Each form was filled in with necessary information, including the number of horses or animals for which forage was requested, the name of the company and its commanding officer, the term for which the forage was needed, the daily allowance of various grains in pounds to each animal, and the total grain allowance. The form was signed by the commanding officer, once to certify the requisition, and again to acknowledge receipt of forage from the Quartermaster. These requisitions are interfiled in chronological order with the other papers of the National Period.

7,680 pounds of corn, 8,760 pounds of fodder requested by Lieutenant W.L.D. White for forty public horses for sixteen days in Captain J.B. Dennis' Company of Rangers.

Folder 4: Forage requisitions submitted by Lieutenant W.L.D. White and Quartermaster John Dunning, Grenada, Mississippi, to J. Moore, Quartermaster, [Mississippi State Troops], 1863 January 22

Documents signed. Various sizes. In English.

The State of Mississippi provided printed forms so that officers could request forage for company horses from the Quartermaster. Each form was filled in with necessary information, including the number of horses or animals for which forage was requested, the name of the company and its commanding officer, the term for which the forage was needed, the daily allowance of various grains in pounds to each animal, and the total grain allowance. The form was signed by the commanding officer, once to certify the requisition, and again to acknowledge receipt of forage from the Quartermaster. These requisitions are interfiled in chronological order with the other papers of the National Period.

12 pounds of corn, 14 pounds of fodder requested by John Dunning, Quartermaster, 1st Regiment, Mississippi Minute Men, for six private horses for ten days in Colonel Ben King's Company.

Folder 5: Record of disbursements "on account of contingencies," made by J. Moore, Assistant Commissary of Subsistence, [Mississippi State Troops], no place, 1863 January

Document. In English.

This record listed the names of individuals and amounts paid to them for commutation of rations.

Folder 6: Provision return submitted by J. Moore, Assistant Commissary of Subsistence, Grenada, Mississippi, 1863 January

Document. Signed: H.S. Trenolla, Acting Commissary. In English.

This return included amounts of beef, pork, meal, rice, rye, sugar, candles, vinegar, soap, salt, molasses, and potatoes issued and received during January.

Folder 7: Forage requisitions submitted by Lieutenant W.L.D. White and Quartermaster John Dunning, Grenada, Mississippi, to J. Moore, Quartermaster, [Mississippi State Troops], 1863 February 1

Documents signed. Various sizes. In English.

The State of Mississippi provided printed forms so that officers could request forage for company horses from the Quartermaster. Each form was filled in with necessary information, including the number of horses or animals for which forage was requested, the name of the company and its commanding officer, the term for which the forage was needed, the daily allowance of various grains in pounds to each animal, and the total grain allowance. The form was signed by the commanding officer, once to certify the requisition, and again to acknowledge receipt of forage from the Quartermaster. These requisitions are interfiled in chronological order with the other papers of the National Period.

12 pounds of corn requested by John Dunning for six private horses for seven days for the 1st Regiment of Mississippi Minute Men.

Folder 8: Receipt issued by Captain W.O. Burton, Assistant Quartermaster, no place, to Major J. Moore, Quartermaster, Grenada, Mississippi, 1863 February 4

Document signed. In English.

Burton acknowledged delivery of forty bushels of corn in good condition.

Folder 9: Statement of accounts of the Quartermaster Department, submitted by J. Moore, Grenada, Mississippi, 1863 March 20

Document signed. In English.

The statement was a record of expenditures, which listed names of individuals and amounts paid to them for specific goods or services from 1862 October 27-December 31.

Folder 10: Personal letter from Mrs. F.A. Brockenbrough, Chatham, [Virginia], to her son [Lieutenant] Austin Brokenbrough, [55th Virginia Volunteers], 1863 April 25

Autograph letter. Signed: Mother, sewn together by hand. In English.

By way of explanation Mrs. Brockenbrough wrote above the salutation, "A Mother's parting words to her soldier boy." At a later date she added the note, "Carried During the War by Austin Brockenbrough." Mrs. Brockenbrough admonished her son not to forget his Christian upbringing or abandon his faith in God. She then cited passages from the Bible to justify the South's going to war. She implored him to eschew drunkenness and profanity. She related that the black people of the district had expressed grave concern for their absent masters. Among themselves, she added, they had voluntarily taken up a collection for the poor and needy soldiers of the South.

Folder 11: Order issued by C.W. Killborn, Provost Marshal, New Orleans, for the expulsion of Louis Berrior, 1863 May 9

Document. Printed form with Berrior's name filled in. In English.

Killborn ordered the expulsion of Louis Berrior, an enemy of the United States, to leave Orleans Parish for the "so-called Confederacy" before 1863 May 15. "You will be allowed to carry," the order read, "the equivalent of ten days' rations in food; such wearing apparel as you may have in actual use, and the necessary beds and bedding required for your personal use."

Folder 12: Order issued by C.W. Killborn, Provost Marshal, New Orleans, for the expulsion of Charles Girault, 1863 May 9

Document. Printed form with Girault's name filled in. In English.

Killborn ordered Girault's expulsion as an enemy of the United States. [See the preceding entry.]

Folder 13: Official report of Brigadier General Thomas E. Vick, Headquarters Louisiana Army, District of North Louisiana, Natchitoches, addressed to the Adjutant General's Office, no place, 1863 May 29

Document. Contemporary copy? In English.

Vick complained that the raising of state forces had been hampered by "dilatory" officers, poor mail service, spring floods, and a "desire to evade the performance of duty to the State, by many sections of the Department." As a result, companies were unfilled, and militia officers elected were unsuitable. Vick suggested that the companies already enrolled be used to "bring to the field all those refusing to perform duty."

Folder 14: Statement of accounts submitted by Major William H. Thomas, Acting Chief Quartermaster, Trans-Mississippi Department, Alexandria, Louisiana, 1863 May 31

Document signed. In English.

Thomas gave an accounting of all funds received and disbursed by the Quartermaster's Department for the quarter ending 1863 March 31.

Folder 15: Personal letter from "Marion," [Louisiana], to her cousin [Anne], no place, 1863 May

Autograph letter signed. Fragment. In English.

The writer told her cousin about the Union troops in Franklin, [Louisiana], and repeated the rumor that the Federals would go up to the Red River. She mentioned that one Mr. McWilliams was running a government plantation, "belonging I suppose to some true hearted Confederate...Such people should be remembered after the war." The majority of the men had taken the Oath of Allegiance, except for Mr. Nelson and Mr. Robertson. She also told of Old Hannah, a slave who, to the surprise of all the family, "had her things taken to the boat and off she went."

Folder 16: Personal letter from [Evan], a Confederate sailor on board the steamer Drover, Alexandria, [Louisiana], to "Dear Sister and Mother and Niece," no place, 1863 June 11

Autograph letter. Incomplete. In English.

The writer had been on the Drover for a year, going between Port Hudson and Vicksburg and up the Red River. He told of his brothers, who were also working on various vessels on the rivers. He gave news of the battles and actions around Port Hudson, Vicksburg, and Bayou Sara. He also gave prices of foodstuffs and commented on the low value of Confederate currency.

Folder 17: Personal letter from [Evan], [Louisiana?], to [his sister], no place, 1863 June 13

Autograph letter signed. In English.

The writer asked if Confederate money would be of any service to her. If so, he would send her some.

Folder 18: Poem written by an anonymous person, entitled "Arrivée des prisonniers de Vicksburg et de Port-Hudson", 1863 July

Manuscript. In French.

The poem described the Union soldiers who led the prisoners as savage beasts. The writer concluded that the prisoners were the true heroes, "shining with honor, but without force or courage."

Folder 19: Receipts issued by Quartermasters, Carrollton, Mississippi, to J. Moore, Quartermaster, Mississippi State Troops, 1863 August 13

Autograph documents signed. Signatures indicated below in English.

Theses Quartermasters of units acknowledged receipt of their Quartermaster funds from Captain J. Moore. Each receipt stated that the signer was to account for the funds to Colonel A.M. Mist, Quartermaster General of the State of Mississippi. The receipts are interfiled in chronological order with the other documents of the National Period.

$1,200 issued to W.H. Curtis, Lieutenant and Assistant Quartermaster. /s/ W. H. Curtis.

Folder 20: Special orders Number 202 issued by command of Major General Nathaniel P. Banks, Headquarters, Department of the Gulf, New Orleans, 1863 August 17

Document. Extracted contemporary copy. In English.

This order, originally signed by Assistant Adjutant General Richard B. Irwin, stated that the banks of the city must turn over to Colonel S[amuel] B. Holabird, Chief Quartermaster, all monies belonging to or credited to registered enemies or known Confederates.

Folder 21: Official letter from S[amuel] B. Holabird, Office, Chief Quartermaster, Department of the Gulf, New Orleans, to Captain [John W.] McClure, [New Orleans], 1863 August 17

Letter. Certified contemporary copy signed by Jno W. McClure. In English.

Holabird ordered McClure, Assistant Quartermaster, to hold the funds seized under Special Orders Number 202 and not to make disbursements without orders. [This is written on the reverse of the above entry.]

This item is found in Box 13, Folder 20.

Folder 22: Official letter from Major General Nathaniel P. Banks, Headquarters, Department of the Gulf, New Orleans, to Captain John W. McClure, Assistant Quartermaster, New Orleans, 1863 August 20

Letter. Certified contemporary copy signed by Jno W. McClure. In English.

Banks explained that the funds of registered enemies or known Confederates were not absolutely forfeited by those persons, but had to be transferred to government hands. The list of enemies that had accompanied Special Orders Number 202 [of August 17] was "not a part of the order but a memorandum to assist in its execution."

Folder 23: Receipt issued by John W. McClure, Captain and Assistant Quartermaster, [New Orleans], to the New Orleans Canal and Banking Company, 1863 August 25

Document signed. Countersigned: Laf[ayette] Guyol. In English.

McClure acknowledged receipt of $40,220.70 confiscated from the New Orleans Canal and Banking Company in compliance with Special Orders Number 202. The receipt listed the names of twenty Confederates and the amount seized from each.

Folder 24: Receipts issued by Quartermasters, Carrollton, Mississippi, to J. Moore, Quartermaster, Mississippi State Troops, 1863 August 28

Autograph documents signed. Signatures indicated below in English.

Theses Quartermasters of units acknowledged receipt of their Quartermaster funds from Captain J. Moore. Each receipt stated that the signer was to account for the funds to Colonel A.M. Mist, Quartermaster General of the State of Mississippi. The receipts are interfiled in chronological order with the other documents of the National Period.

$5,000 issued to Captain John W. Baskerville, Quartermaster Pettus Patrol. /s/ John Baskerville.

Folder 25: Personal letter from "Cousin Allie," Starville, to "Cousin Anne," no place, 1863 September 2

Autograph letter signed. In English.

The writer expressed grief over the death of her own son.

Folder 26: Receipts issued by Quartermasters, Carrollton, Mississippi, to J. Moore, Quartermaster, Mississippi State Troops, 1863 September 3

Autograph documents signed. Signatures indicated below in English.

Theses Quartermasters of units acknowledged receipt of their Quartermaster funds from Captain J. Moore. Each receipt stated that the signer was to account for the funds to Colonel A.M. Mist, Quartermaster General of the State of Mississippi. The receipts are interfiled in chronological order with the other documents of the National Period.

$2,000 issued to T.K. Nelson, Quartermaster, Captain A.H. Forrest's Company of Sunflower Rangers. /s/ T.K. Nelson.

Folder 27: Receipt issued my Major Edward Phillip, Shreveport, Louisiana, to Major William H. Thomas, Trans-Mississippi Department, no place, 1863 October 2

Document signed. In English.

Phillip acknowledged receipt of $200,000 in Subsistence Funds from Thomas.

Folder 28: Telegram from D.L. Kernion, Mobile, [Alabama], to [Private?] A.L. [H.] Kernion, 23rd Louisiana Regiment, Enterprise, Mississippi (with envelope), 1863 October 14

Telegram. In English.

The writer was on his way to Richmond, but would remain in Mobile for five days. He asked if [Private?] Kernion, [a recently released prisoner of war], needed anything.

Folder 29: Pass issued by Charles W. Peden, Captain and Provost Marshal, Military Post, Atlanta, to J.A. Bartlett, [Atlanta?], 1863 December 10

Document. In English.

The pass allowed Bartlett to go to Brandon Mississippi.

Folder 30: Pay order vouchers issued by the State of Mississippi to various individuals, 1863 December 14

Documents signed. Signatures as indicated below. Various sizes. In English.

The State of Mississippi issued print voucher forms to authorize payment for goods and services rendered by individual citizens to the Army of Mississippi. Each voucher gave a handwritten itemized statement of the individual's account and was signed by the Assistant Quartermaster General. The citizen acknowledged receipt of payment by also signing the form. A few of the vouchers in this group are entirely in manuscript. The vouchers are interfiled in chronological order with the other papers of the National Period. The following is an inventory of the documents.

$53.70 to T.L. Kirkham, Grenada, Mississippi, for 537 pounds of fresh beef. /s/ J. Moore.

Folder 31: Personal letter E[van] [illegible], Bayou Sara, to "Dear Sister," no place, 1863 December 22

Autograph letter signed. In English.

The writer discussed employment problems caused by the coexistence of the Union and the Confederacy in Louisiana. His brother Henry was joining the cavalry as a substitute for F.V. Leake.

Folder 32: Official letter from Major W[illiam] H. Thomas, Assistant Commissary of Subsistence, no place, to "Whittaker," no place, circa 1863-1864

Autograph letter signed. In English.

Thomas requested that Mr. Tarnigan's mill be set to work and corn be parched, as General [E. Kirby-] Smith wanted meal made of parched corn.

Folder 33: Letter book of Major General John M. Palmer, Headquarters, 14th United States Army Corps, 1863-1869

Bound manuscript. 76 filled pages. In English.

The letter book contained copies of nineteen orders issued in 1864 May and June by General Palmer. The orders, which were given during the Atlanta campaign, were addressed to Generals Absalom Baird, Richard W. Johnson, George Henry Thomas, William D. Whipple, and Jefferson Columbus Davis. [Some were published in The War of the Rebellion: Official Records, Volume XXXVIII, Part 4.]

Included in the volume is a copy of an 1863 November 18 letter from Major General Ulysses S. Grant, Headquarters, Military Division of the Mississippi, in Chattanooga, Tennessee, to Palmer concerning the Union attack on Missionary Ridge. There are also copies of 1863 military letters from Daniel Butterfield in Ringgold, Georgia, and C. Goddard in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. The copy of a 1864 August 16 letter from Palmer to the Adjutant General of the United States Army concerns Palmer's relief from command. A 1864 September 7 report by Palmer at Jonesboro, Georgia, concerns the movement of the 3rd Division, 14th Army Corps from Chattanooga.

In addition, the volume contains Palmer's personal financial accounts for 1865 September. There is also a copy of a speech given by the Honorable John M. Wilson before the 1869 January-February session of the Illinois Legislature in Springfield, in which he pointed out the unconstitutionality of a railroad rate bill.

[John McAuley Palmer (1817-1900), a native of Carlinville, Illinois, was Governor of Illinois from 1868 to 1872. In 1896 he ran for President of the United States on the National Democratic ticket.]

Folder 34: Report of provisions received, submitted by Major William H. Thomas, Commissary of Subsistence, Shreveport, Louisiana, 1864 January

Document signed. In English.

The return listed the unit amounts of hogs, fresh and salt pork, lard, salt, potatoes, corn, and fodder received and the source of these commodities.

Folder 35: Special Orders Number 151 issued by command of Major General Nathaniel P. Banks, Headquarters, Department of the Gulf, New Orleans, to the President of the Canal and banking Company, 1864 June 9

Document. Printed extract signed by George B. Drake, Assistant Adjutant General. In English.

The [New Orleans] Canal and Banking Company was to pay $756 to the Provost Marshal to defray expenses of the commission that examined its condition as per Special Orders Number 69. Following the order is a receipt, dated 1864 June 13, written and signed by Major W.W. Howe, Acting Assistant Adjutant General, who stated that the Canal and Banking Company had paid the required sum.

Folder 36: Statement of accounts submitted by Major William H. Thomas, Commissary of Subsistence, Shreveport, Louisiana, 1864 July

Document signed. In English.

Thomas reported that he had received and spent $511,696.41 for the Subsistence account during 1864 July.

Folder 37: Personal letter from an unidentified woman, Augusta, [Georgia?], to [Mississippi?] Sidney [Harding?], no place, 1864 August 1

Autograph letter. Incomplete. In English.

The writer told of the destruction of plantations and the capture of relatives and friends by the Federals. She herself had been captured and had had to bribe a Union soldier to get back her luggage. She mentioned Vinson's Scouts and Sickle's Scouts, and related that Sidney's home had been used as a Federal smallpox hospital and then burned.

Folder 38: Personal letter from Tho[ma]s E. Vick, "Camp near Church," to "Miss Fannie," no place, 1864 August 13

Autograph letter signed. In English.

Vick thanked Miss Fannie for a 'graceful and useful souvenir."

Folder 39: Personal letter from [a black servant] "Aunt Abbey," [Georgia?], to Miss Sydney Harding, no place, 1864 September 15

Letter, written for Aunt Abbey by an unidentified person. In English.

Aunt Abbey described the destruction that the Federals had caused on the plantation and the work that the servants had been able to do. The big house had burned, and she wished that "the Yankees...had have got burnt up." "The war has turned everything upside down," she noted, "but we are the same old thing. We keep up our family prayer meetings yet." A note follows, written in the same hand, from [another black servant] "Hetty" to "Miss Ann."

Folder 40: Reports of persons and articles employed and hired at Shreveport, Louisiana, submitted by Major William H. Thomas, 1864 September, December

Documents (2). September report signed by Wm. H. Thomas and E. Kirby Smith. December report unsigned. In English.

These Confederate monthly reports listed the names of persons or items hired, their occupation or designation, term, and rate of service, date of contract, purpose of service, and amount of pay or rent due from previous months.

Folder 41: Receipts for Confederate Subsistence Funds issued by Subsistence Department personnel to Major William H. Thomas, Shreveport, Louisiana, 1864 October 1

Documents signed. Signatures as indicated below. In English.

Major Thomas turned over his subsistence funds to these individuals, who signed the receipts and were then held accountable for the money to the Treasury of the Confederate States. The receipts are filed in chronological order with the the other documents of the National Period.

$1,500 issued by Captain J.W. Calloway, Commissary Subsistence.

Folder 42: Official letter from John F. Wood, New Orleans, to Senator [A.] Wood [of Sabine Parish], 1864 October 2

Printed form letter with date and addressee's name filled in. In English.

The telegram was sent by the South-Western Telegraph Company and read " Captain McKey will pay your [sic] eighteen hundred and fifty dollars."

Folder 43: Receipts for Confederate Subsistence Funds issued by Subsistence Department personnel to Major William H. Thomas, Shreveport, Louisiana, 1864 October 14

Documents signed. Signatures as indicated below. In English.

Major Thomas turned over his subsistence funds to these individuals, who signed the receipts and were then held accountable for the money to the Treasury of the Confederate States. The receipts are filed in chronological order with the the other documents of the National Period.

$5,000 issued to Captain T. Lytt Lyon, Agent Subsistence Department.

Folder 44: Receipts for Confederate Subsistence Funds issued by Subsistence Department personnel to Major William H. Thomas, Shreveport, Louisiana, 1864 October 28

Documents signed. Signatures as indicated below. In English.

Major Thomas turned over his subsistence funds to these individuals, who signed the receipts and were then held accountable for the money to the Treasury of the Confederate States. The receipts are filed in chronological order with the the other documents of the National Period.

$10,000 issued by T. Lytt Lyon.

Folder 45: Receipts for Confederate Subsistence Funds issued by Subsistence Department personnel to Major William H. Thomas, Shreveport, Louisiana, 1864 October 31

Documents signed. Signatures as indicated below. In English.

Major Thomas turned over his subsistence funds to these individuals, who signed the receipts and were then held accountable for the money to the Treasury of the Confederate States. The receipts are filed in chronological order with the the other documents of the National Period.

$500 issued by James A. Lusk, Agent Subsistence Department.

Folder 46: Receipts for Confederate Subsistence Funds issued by Subsistence Department personnel to Major William H. Thomas, Shreveport, Louisiana, 1864 December 3

Documents signed. Signatures as indicated below. In English.

Major Thomas turned over his subsistence funds to these individuals, who signed the receipts and were then held accountable for the money to the Treasury of the Confederate States. The receipts are filed in chronological order with the the other documents of the National Period.

$5,000 issued by Major Jno. W. Brown, Commissary Subsistence, Wharton's Cavalry.

Folder 47: Telegram from C.F. Hatcher, Mobile, to T.H. Bartlette, Amite, Louisiana, 1864 December 10

Telegram. In English.

The telegram was sent by the South-Western Telegraph Company and read "Captain McKey will pay your [sic] eighteen hundred and fifty dollars."

Folder 48: Receipts for Confederate Subsistence Funds issued by Subsistence Department personnel to Major William H. Thomas, Shreveport, Louisiana, 1864 December 15

Documents signed. Signatures as indicated below. In English.

Major Thomas turned over his subsistence funds to these individuals, who signed the receipts and were then held accountable for the money to the Treasury of the Confederate States. The receipts are filed in chronological order with the the other documents of the National Period.

$20,000 issued by Major J.K.P. Campbell, Commissary Subsistence.

Folder 49: Promissory Exchange Notes issued by F.H. Hatch, Confederate State Depository, Tangipahoa, Louisiana, 1864 December 31

Documents signed. In English.

These printed certificates stated that the bearer of the note had turned in old-issue notes and was entitled to new-issue notes. The amounts were filled in - $40 on one and $60 on the other.

Folder 50: Vouchers issued by Major William H. Thomas, Shreveport, Louisiana, for room rent due to J[ohn] H. Reynolds, Shreveport, by the Confederate States, 1864 December 31

Documents signed. In English.

Reynolds charged $150 for the rent from July through September 1864, and $75 for the rent of a room during October 1864. Thomas certified that the room had been used as an office and issued payment to Reynolds, who acknowledged receipt by signing the vouchers.

Folder 51: Report of persons hired at, Shreveport, Louisiana, submitted by Major H. Thomas, 1864 December
Folder 52: Autograph book of Confederate officers in the Union prison at Johnson's Island, Ohio, compiled by Captain John P. Mumford, 1864

Bound manuscript. In English.

In this autograph book there are the signatures of 202 Confederate officers, prisoners in 1864 at Johnson's Island in Lake Erie. The book was organized by states, and each soldier signed his name, rank, home address, and place of capture. Asa Hartz wrote in three poems and General Isaac Ridgeway Trimble (1802-1888) of Kentucky entered a song espousing the Confederate cause, [Mumford, the compiler, was assistant Quartermaster, Scott's Regiment, 1st Louisiana Cavalry, and was a prisoner on the island for nearly two years.]

Folder 53: Receipts for Confederate Subsistence Funds issued by Subsistence Department personnel to Major William H. Thomas, Shreveport, Louisiana
Folder 54: Diary of unidentified Union sailor, 1865 January 1-July 5

Bound manuscript. In English.

The writer, a native of Pittsburgh, was stationed on the gunboat Chillicothe at Fort Adams, Mississippi, from January 1 until February 7, when he received orders to proceed to Mound City, Illinois, there to report to Admiral S. Phillips Lee. Throughout February and March he traveled between Cairo, Mound City, and Cincinnati. In April he was placed in command of the U.S.S. Kate, which patrolled the river between New Madrid, Missouri, and Tiptonville, Tennessee. His wife Dolly accompanied him during this time. In June he was back in Mound City and, after relinquishing command of the Kate to Lieutenant G.W. Rogers, he received his discharge on June 19, whereupon he and his wife returned to Pittsburgh. The entries are mainly weather observations and a record of the different vessels that passed his post.

Folder 55: Military telegram from Lieutenant W.L. Bradford, Battery Semmes, Chaffin's Bluff, [Virginia], to Captain S.S. Lee, Office of Orders and Detail, Richmond, 1865 January 24

Telegram. In English.

Bradford reported on Confederate activities on the [James River] below Richmond and gave casualty figures. He mentioned the explosion of the Drewry and Confederate attempts to run the Union obstructions. All vessels were under Battery Dantzler.

Folder 56: Account of pay and clothing of A[natole] L.H. Kernion, Company C., 22nd Louisiana Regiment, [Mobile, Louisiana], 1865 February 21

Document. Contemporary certified copy signed: Clement G. Hearsey, 1st. Lieut Cmdg Co. "C" 22nd La 2. In English.

The account gave a physical description of Kernion, personal and military history, pay record, and a list of clothing issued to him at General Hospital Cantey in Mobile.

Folder 57: Pass issued by Lieutenant Warren A. Grice, Commandant Post, Amite City, Louisiana, to Charles Louque, Saint John the Baptist Parish, 1865 February 26

Autograph document signed. In English.

Charles Louque, a recruit for the Louisiana Guard Battery, Army of Virginia, was to be permitted to pass from the Amite City post to Mobile, where he would report to Colonel T.S. Taylor. The pass gave a physical description of Louque.

Folder 58: Receipts for Confederate Subsistence Funds issued by Subsistence Department personnel to Major William H. Thomas, Shreveport, Louisiana
Folder 59: Special Orders Number 73, concerning Private Charles Louque at Meridian, Mississippi, 1865 March 14

Document. Extract signed by J.H. Trezevant, Captain Commanding Post. In English.

Louque, who had been mustered into the Louisiana Guard Battery on this date, was immediately to proceed to his command at Richmond. On the back are certifications of transportation provided for Louque.

Folder 60: Bill collection authorization given by P.J. Pavy, New Orleans, to L.J. Gary, New Orleans, 1865 March 19

Document. Signed: L.J. Gary. In French.

L.J. Gary, a lawyer, acknowledged that he had been authorized by P.J. Pavy, a commission merchant, to collect the following overdue promissory notes: 1) two one-year notes for 2,000 piastres each, dated 1862 March 10, signed by Charles Tetrou in favor of Lobit, Charpantier and Company, and endorsed by the latter to Pavy; 2) a one-year note for 1,500 piastres, dated 1862 March 18, signed by Alexander Darcourt Landry and Darcourt Landry, co-jointly, in favor of Lobit, Charpantier and Company, and endorsed by the latter to Pavy.

Folder 61: Personal letter from Colonel William Preston Johnston, Washington, Georgia, to Lieutenant [Charles H.C.?] Brown, Washington Artillery, no place, 1865 May 3

Letter. Uncertified, contemporary copy. In English.

Johnson wrote on behalf of President [Jefferson Davis] to thank Brown for the assistance given by him and his men as part of Davis' escort [during his escape from Richmond]. This copy was sent to Charles Louque of the Louisiana Guards. [Not in Rowland, Jefferson Davis, His Letters...]

Folder 62: Personal letter from Lieutenant C[harles] H.C. Brown, President's escort, Washington, Georgia, to C[harles] A. Louque, Louisiana Guard Artillery, no place, 1865 May 4

Autograph letter signed. In English.

Brown transmitted a copy of a May 3 letter that he had received from President Davis. He commended Louque for his service as a member the presidential escort. "In this dark hour of our history it is pleasent [sic] for you to have the proud satisfaction of knowing that you have done your duty to your country to the very last - until received by her chief magistrate himself."

Folder 63: Oath sworn by Private Ch[arle]s A. Louque, Louisiana Guard Artillery, Covington, Georgia, 1865 May 8

Document signed. In English.

Louque swore that he would not take up arms against the government of the United States.

Folder 64: Parole issued to Private A[natole] L.H. Kernion, New Orleans, by Major General E.R.S. Canby, United States Army, Meridian, Mississippi, 1865 May 10

Document. Signed: Henry Bertram, Col. 20th Wis. Infty. Vols., Commissioner for the U.S. in English.

Private Kernion, Company C, 22nd Regiment Louisiana Infantry, now paroled, was to be permitted to return home undisturbed by United States authorities.

Folder 65: Parole issued to Private A[natole] L.H. Kernion, New Orleans by Major General E.R.S. Canby, United States Army, Meridian, Mississippi, 1865 May 16

Document. Signed: Chas. Scott, Jr., Captain and Assistant Provost Marshal. In English.

This printed form, filled with the recipient's name, stated that Private Louque could proceed unmolested to his home in New Orleans as long as he observed the conditions of the parole and the laws of his place of residence.

Folder 66: Order issued by Lieutenant S.R. Palmer, 8th Iowa Infantry, Assistant Post Quartermaster, Montgomery, Alabama, for transportation of E.A. Louque, 1865 May 16

Document signed. In English.

The United States Transport was to furnish Louque, a paroled prisoner, transportation from Montgomery to Mobile.

Folder 67: Statement of accounts made by Major William H. Thomas, [Shreveport, Louisiana?], 1865 May 20

Document signed. In English.

The statement listed names of those who were paid, the date, the account, and the amount for the second quarter of 1865.

Folder 68: Pass issued by Colonel F.A. Starring, Provost Marshal, Headquarters, Department of the Gulf, New Orleans, to E.A. Louque, New Orleans, 1865 May 20

Document. In English.

The five-day pass allowed Louque to travel on the steamer Monsoon to Saint John the Baptist Parish, where he was to report to the Provost Marshal upon arrival.

Folder 69: Roll of enlisted men of Fenner's Battery of the Louisiana Artillery, circa 1865 May

Document. Unsigned. In English.

[Fenner's Battery was composed of former members of Dreux's Battalion, who had been among the first volunteers from Louisiana. Under the command of Captain Charles E. Fenner the Battery was organized on 1862 May 16. During the Civil War it participated in a number of battles and surrendered on 1865 May 10 with the Army of General Taylor.] The roll gave the name and rank of each man and included a brief statement of his service record.

Folder 70: Record book of properties offered for sale by Juste Fontaine, real estate broker, New Orleans, 1865 June 21-1875 April 23

Bound manuscript. 132 of 216 pages filled. In French, English.

The volume contained individual entries for buildings or land that Fontaine offered for sale. Fontaine noted the name of the vendor, address, and description of the property, asking price, and terms. In the early entries he included the final disposition of the property, whether sold, when, to whom and price, or whether the listing was dropped.

Box 14: National period, 1865-1873
Folder 1: Personal letter from "Hutch," Fremont, [no state], to "Dear Colonel," no place, 1865 September 19

Autograph letter signed. In English.

The writer was sending all the letters of General Sherman in his office. He asked the Colonel to return those not wanted, as they might be needed to settle accounts.

Folder 2: Oath of allegiance to the United States, sworn by F.E. Harding, Caddo Parish, 1865 October 24

Document signed. Marked: "A true Copy." In English.

Before H.E. Allen, Justice of the Peace, Caddo Parish, F.E. Harding swore to uphold the Constitution of the United States and to abide by the laws of the nation "that have been made during the existing rebellion, with reference to the emancipation of slaves."

Folder 3: Lease of house by Peter Marcy, New Orleans, to S. Weinschenck, 1865 December 26

Document signed. In English.

Marcy leased to Weinschenck for the term of one year, beginning 1865 October 1, a house situated at [239?] Baronne for $60 per month.

Folder 4: Address book of prisoners, Johnson's Island, [Ohio], kept by John M. Coos, Company C, 30th Louisiana Volunteers, 1865, 1867

Bound manuscript. In English.

This pocket diary was used by John Coos as an autograph/address book of the Confederate prisoners of Block 11, Mess 1, Company 22 at Johnson's Island. In addition to the names and addresses of ninety-seven prisoners, the volume also contained Coo's financial accounts for 1865 January-June and the signatures of a number of veterans, who attended a reunion in New Orleans in 1887 April.

Folder 5: Order issued by Brevet Lieutenant Colonel De Witt Clinton, Judge Advocate, Headquarters, Department of Louisiana, New Orleans, to the banks and banking associations of Louisiana, 1866 January 10

Document signed. In English.

Clinton ordered the banks to turn over to his office, as captured property, all bonds, stocks, and securities in their possession that were issued by state, municipal, or parish authorities or by individuals or corporations in aid of the rebellion.

Folder 6: Receipt issued by Brevet Lieutenant Colonel De Witt Clinton, Judge Advocate, New Orleans, to the New Orleans Canal and Banking Company, New Orleans, 1866 January 19

Document signed. In English.

Clinton acknowledged having received from the New Orleans Canal and Banking Company $250,000 in Confederate bonds, $75,000 in Louisiana state bonds, and $20,500 in bonds of various parishes. [This item is attached to and filed with Clinton's Order of 1866 January 10.]

This item is in Box 14, Folder 5.

Folder 7: Certificate of mortgages existing against the property of Mathilde Toups, widow of Henry Claiborne Thibodaux, Terrebonne Parish, 1866 March 12

Document. Signed: J.R. Verret, Recorder. In English.

J.R. Verret, Recorder of Mortgages in Terrebonne Parish, certified that in his records there were a number of mortgages against the properties of Mathilde Toups, widow of H.C. Thibodaux. She held title in her own right and as natural tutrix of her six children (names given) to the undivided two-thirds of a sugar plantation called Saint Brigitte, situated in Terrebonne Parish, and to the undivided two-thirds of two tracts situated on Grand Coteau, adjoining the aforementioned plantation. Against these properties were registered two judicial mortgages in favor of Jules Levois for the sum of $1,418.24, dating from 1854; a conventional mortgage in favor of Michel Aimé for $37,750.00, dating from 1854; and two conventional mortgages in favor of Messrs. Bellocq, Noblom and Company for $36,316.92 and $ 90,000.00 dating from 1858 and 1860.

Folder 8: Receipt for payment of premium, issued by the New Orleans Mutual Insurance Company to Peter Marcy, 1866 November 12

Document. Signed: Carlin L. Turgeau. In English.

Marcy paid fire insurance premiums for 1866 October in the amount of $131.25 to the New Orleans Mutual Insurance Company.

Folder 9: Personal letter from Alexander H[amilton] Stephens, Crawfordville, Georgia, to Mrs. [Thomas J.?] Semmes, no place, 1866 December 25

Autograph letter signed. English.

Stephens reminisced about Christmas in Richmond two years before when Bishop [John] McGill had joined them for dinner. He discussed his plan to devote a year to writing a history of the [Civil] war [A Constitutional View of the Late War Between the States, published 1868-1870]. He mentioned that he had made a trip to Washington to see [Robert] Toombs.

Folder 10: Business letters from E. Jeannin, New Orleans, to Alcide Trouard, Jefferson Parish, 1867 April 10-August 8

Autograph letters signed. Various sizes. In French.

Alcide Trouard had a truck farm in Jefferson Parish. He shipped the vegetables he grew to E. Jeannin for sale in New Orleans. The letters give an accounting of produce sold, prices paid, and market demand.

Folder 11: Voter registration certificate issued to Charles Louque, New Orleans, by Edward Ames, Register, City of New Orleans, 1867 May 10

Document signed. In English.

Ames certified that Louque, a resident of the Second District, Tenth Precinct, was registered as a qualified elector of the City of New Orleans. On the back was an oath, signed by Louque, who declared that he had never taken an oath of office in the United States government and then subsequently participated in "insurrection and rebellion against the United States."

Folder 12: Business letter from M.P. Burr, Saint Louis, to the Secretary of State, Jackson, Mississippi, 1867 August 22

Autograph letter signed. In English.

M.P. Burr, Secretary and Actuary of the Guaranty Insurance Company of Saint Louis, requested the Secretary of State to send him a copy of the state regulations relating to foreign fire insurance companies that operated in Mississippi.

Folder 13: Personal letter fro Joseph E. Johnston, Abingdon, Virginia, to Jefferson Davis, [Lennoxville, Canada], 1867 September 30

Autograph letter signed. In English.

[This letter, along with those dated 1867 October 23 (2 letters), 1868 January 6 and 24, 1874 January 7, and 1880 December 16, relate to the conflict between Johnston and Davis, which in part was the result of Davis' having relieved Johnston from command of the Confederate Army in Georgia in 1864 July. G.E. Govan and J.W. Livingood presented an account of the controversy in their biography of Johnston (pages 382-384), and Johnston gave his own version in his Narrative (pages 430-465).]

In the letter Johnston stated that he had learned that T.J. Wharton, former Attorney-General of Mississippi, had in his possession a document written by Davis and allegedly submitted to members of the Confederate Congress. "The paper," he continued, "is described as a series of attacks upon my previous conduct as a Confederate officer." As it had reportedly been shown to a number of persons, Johnston asked Davis to instruct Wharton to give Colonel [James M.] Kennard, [Official Secretary to Governor Benjamin G. Humphreys of Mississippi], a copy for him (Johnston) so that he might defend himself. [Published in Rowland, Jefferson Davis, His Letters..., VII, 129-130.]

Folder 14: Personal letter from Jefferson Davis, Lennoxville, Canada, to T.J. Wharton, Jackson, Mississippi, 1867 October 23

Autograph letter signed. In English.

Davis enclosed the letter dated September 30 that he had received from Joseph E. Johnston and a copy of his answer. Davis presumed that Johnston referred to some explanation Davis might have written to justify his removal of of the General from military command. If Wharton had any such letter that fitted Johnston's description, he was authorized to send Johnston a copy thereof. [Published in Rowland, Jefferson Davis, His Letters...VII, 132.]

Folder 15: Personal letter from Jefferson Davis, Lennoxville, Canada, to Joseph E. Johnston, [Abingdon, Virginia], 1867 October 23

Autograph letter signed. Copy for T.J. Wharton, enclosed in Davis to Wharton, 1867 October 23. In English.

In answer to Johnston's letter of September 30, Davis denied the existence of a circular or paper such as Johnston alleged. Johnston was certainly aware that Davis on occasions had disapproved of his conduct as military commander. Davis, however, would write his friend T.J. Wharton and ask him to give Johnston a copy of any documents Davis might have written in regard to him. [Published in Rowland, Jefferson Davis, His Letters...VII, 131.]

Folder 16: Personal letter from Joseph E. Johnston, Baltimore, to Jefferson Davis, no place, 1868 January 6

Autograph letter signed. In English.

[Davis and his family were visiting New Orleans or Mississippi at this time.] Johnston acknowledged receipt of Davis' letter of 1867 October 23. He had received one from T.J. Wharton, who had informed him that the Davis paper he had requested had been borrowed from and returned to E[thelbert] Barksdale, the custodian of it. As the paper seemed to be the one Johnston wished to read, he asked Davis to request Barksdale to furnish a copy of it to James M. Kennard, his representative. [Published in Rowland, Jefferson Davis, his Letters...VII, 234.]

Folder 17: Personal letter from T.J. Wharton, Jackson, Mississippi, to Jefferson Davis, [in Mississippi], 1868 January 24

Autograph letter signed. In English.

Wharton gave his version of how Joseph E. Johnston came to know of the existence of a written communication addressed by Davis to the Confederate Congress in which Davis had defended his reason for removing Johnston from military command. Wharton had borrowed the only copy in existence from its custodian, Ethelbert Barksdale, and he had privately, and in strictest confidence, read it to several persons. Johnston had probably learned of it from James M. Kennard, secretary to Governor B.G. Humphreys. Although Johnston had alleged that he wanted a copy for use in writing his memoirs, Barksdale had declined to furnish him one. Wharton expressed his continued loyalty to Davis. The Davis-Johnston controversy, he believed, had been flamed not so much by the zealous partisans of Johnston as by Davis' enemies. [Published in Rowland, Jefferson Davis, His Letters...VII, 234-236.]

Folder 18: Voter registration certificate issued to Charles Louque, New Orleans, by A. Rougelot, Supervisor of Registration, New Orleans, 1868 September 28

Document signed. In English.

Rougelot certified that Louque was registered as a qualified elector of the City of New Orleans. On the back is an oath signed by Louque, who declared that he was not disfranchised and had not held Confederate office for more than one year, led guerrilla bands, registered himself as an enemy of the United States, advocated treason, or voted for or signed an ordinance of secession.

Folder 19: Articles of agreement between the Union Bank of Louisiana, A. Reinhart, Ad Follain, and P.J. Pavy, joint creditors of Phoebe Pierce, 1868

Document. Signed by L.F. Géneres for A. Reinhart; Lafitte, Dufilho and Company for Ad. Follain; Geo. A. Freret, Cashier, Union Bank; and P.J. Pavy. In English.

The participants of the agreement had been unable to obtain settlement of their claim of $14,000 against Phoebe Pierce. The claim was secured by a second mortgage on a plantation that was to be sold on 1868 May 2 as a result of a suit instituted by the Citizens' Bank. The signers, in order to avoid a total loss of their investment, agreed to buy the property with the objective of selling it later for profit. The property would belong to them in proportion to their respective claims - the Union Bank and Reinhart for $4,000 each, and Follain and Pavy for $3,000 each.

The purchase was to be made in Pavy's name. He obligated himself to seek the lowest purchase price from the Citizens' Bank, to sell the plantation when profitable, to manage the place and hire an administrator, to employ laborers to cultivate the land, and to buy farm implements and seed canes. The other parties agreed to pay, each month, their proportion of the money necessary to meet the monthly note due the Citizens' Bank and to cover such expenses as maintenance, wages, purchase of equipment and seed canes, and lawyers' fees. When the partners sold the property, Pavy would receive ten percent of the price for his work.

Folder 20: Business letter from Edward Chaloner, Liverpool, to Bobet Brothers, New Orleans, 1870 August 27

Autograph letter signed. In English.

Bobet Brothers owned a stave yard in New Orleans. Edward Chaloner, agent for the firm in England, sent an accounting of sales of recent shipments received from Bobet and gave information about market demand for various types of staves.

Folder 21: Lectures on the Civil Code of Louisiana, delivered by Christian Roselius, Professor of Civil Law at the University of Louisiana in New Orleans, 1871-1872

Bound manuscript. In English.

The manuscript which is labeled Volume I, was [a copy made in 1895 February by Joshua G. Baker?] of notes taken by C[harles] H[enry] Lavillebeuvre at lectures delivered by Roselius in 1871 and 1872. There is an index of topics in the back.

Folder 22: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 January 31

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Russell, Rainey, and Company

Origin: Jefferson, Texas

Vessel: 13th Era

Folder 23: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 January 31

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Graham and Taylor

Origin: Jefferson, Texas

Vessel: 13th Era

Folder 24: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 1

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Norwood and Scott

Origin: Jefferson, Texas

Vessel: 13th Era

Folder 25: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: S. Frankel

Origin: Jefferson, Texas

Vessel: May Lowry

Folder 26: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 1

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Ellis, Bagby and Company

Origin: Jefferson, Texas

Vessel: 13th Era

Folder 27: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 1

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Goyne and Harper

Origin: Jefferson, Texas

Vessel: May Lowry

Folder 28: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 1

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Goyne and Harper

Origin: Jefferson, Texas

Vessel: 13th Era

Folder 29: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 1

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Wright and Clark

Origin: Jefferson, Texas

Vessel: 13th Era

Folder 30: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 1

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Fellows and Company

Origin: Camden, Arkansas

Vessel: Fontenelle

Folder 31: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 3

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Moses Winter

Origin: Canden, Arkansas

Vessel: Fontenelle

Folder 32: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 3

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Gardner Alfred and Company

Origin: Jefferson, Texas

Vessel: May Lowry

Folder 33: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 3

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Bateman and Brother

Origin: Jefferson, Texas

Vessel: May Lowry

Folder 34: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 3

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Tom D. Thomson

Origin: Camden, Arkansas

Vessel: Fontenelle

Folder 35: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 3

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: E.C. Paschal and Brother

Origin: Camden, Arkansas

Vessel: Fontenelle

Folder 36: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 4

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Dickinson, Williams and Company (two bills)

Origin: Memphis, Tennessee

Vessel: Belle Lee

Folder 37: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 4

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Ellis, Bagby and Company (two bills)

Origin: Jefferson, Texas

Vessel: Belle Rowland

Folder 38: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 5

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Fellows and Company

Origin: Camden, Arkansas

Vessel: Fontenelle

Folder 39: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 5

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Moses Winter

Origin: Camden, Arkansas

Vessel: Bertha

Folder 40: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 5

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Sharman and Sons

Origin: Camden, Arkansas

Vessel: Bertha

Folder 41: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 7

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Snow and Company

Origin: Camden, Arkansas

Vessel: Ruth

Folder 42: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 8

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Brown and Brothers

Origin: Camden, Arkansas

Vessel: May Flower

Folder 43: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Ellis, Bagby and Company

Origin: Jefferson, Texas

Vessel: Era Number 10

Folder 44: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 8

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Ellis, Bagby and Company

Origin: Jefferson, Texas

Vessel: Right Way

Folder 45: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Middlebrooks and Wall

Origin: Jefferson, Texas

Vessel: Right Way

Folder 46: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 10

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Ellis, Bagby and Company

Origin: Jefferson, Texas

Vessel: Bossier

Folder 47: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 11

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Ellis, Bagby and Company

Origin: Jefferson, Texas

Vessel: Ruby

Folder 48: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 12

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Tyra Hill

Origin: Camden, Arkansas

Vessel: P.W. Strader

Folder 49: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 12

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Graham and Taylor

Origin: Jefferson, Texas

Vessel: Flavilla

Folder 50: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 13

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Hoss and Elstner

Origin: Shreveport, Louisiana

Vessel: John T. Moore

Folder 51: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 13

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Ellis, Bagby and Company (three bills)

Origin: Jefferson, Texas

Vessel: Flavilla

Folder 52: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 13

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: W.J. Bentley

Origin: Woodside, Louisiana

Vessel: Lessie Taylor

Folder 53: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 13

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: National Cotton Comp. Co.

Origin: Jefferson, Texas

Vessel: Flavilla

Folder 54: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 14

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Dickinson, Williams and Company

Origin: Memphis, Tennessee

Vessel: John B. Maude

Folder 55: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 14

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Fellows and Company

Origin: Camden, Arkansas

Vessel: St. Luke

Folder 56: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 15

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Graham and Taylor

Origin: Jefferson, Texas

Vessel: Little Fleta

Folder 57: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 15

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: S. Frankel

Origin: Jefferson, Texas

Vessel: Little Fleta

Folder 58: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 15

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Ellis, Bagby, and Company (three bills)

Origin: Jefferson, Texas

Vessel: Little Fleta

Folder 59: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 15

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Goyne and Harper

Origin: Jefferson, Texas

Vessel: Little Fleta

Folder 60: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 16

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: F.L. Pitre

Origin: Washington [no state]

Vessel: Peerless

Folder 61: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 17

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: S. Frankel

Origin: Jefferson, Texas

Vessel: Bossier

Folder 62: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 17

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Gardner Alfred and Company

Origin: Jefferson, Texas

Vessel: Katie P. Konutz

Folder 63: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 17

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Goyne and Harper (two bills)

Origin: Jefferson, Texas

Vessel: Bossier

Folder 64: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 18

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: A. Gilham

Origin: Jefferson, Texas

Vessel: R.T. Byarly

Folder 65: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 18

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Norwood Brothers

Origin: Jefferson, Texas

Vessel: Bossier

Folder 66: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 18

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: S. Frankel

Origin: Jefferson, Texas

Vessel: R.T. Bryarly

Folder 67: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 18

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Bateman and Brother

Origin: Jefferson, Texas

Vessel: Bossier

Folder 68: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 18

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Ellis, Bagby and Company

Origin: Jefferson, Texas

Vessel: R.T. Bryarly

Folder 69: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 18

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: P.H. Rowell

Origin: Jefferson, Texas

Vessel: Bossier

Folder 70: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 19

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Dickinson, Williams and Company (four bills)

Origin: Memphis, Tennessee

Vessel: Belle Lee

Folder 71: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 20

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Dickinson, Williams and Company

Origin: Memphis, Tennessee

Vessel: Belle Lee

Folder 72: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 21

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Fellows and Company

Origin: Camden, Arkansas

Vessel: Ruth

Folder 73: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 21

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Snow and Company

Origin: Camden, Arkansas

Vessel: Ruth

Folder 74: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 21

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Block and Feibleman

Origin: Camden, Arkansas

Vessel: Ruth

Folder 75: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 22

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Norwood and Scott

Origin: Jefferson, Texas

Vessel: 13th Era and Belfast

Folder 76: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 22

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Ellis, Bagby and Company

Origin: Jefferson, Texas

Vessel: 13th Era and Belfast

Folder 77: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 22

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Fellows and Company

Origin: Camden, Arkansas

Vessel: M.J. Lewis

Folder 78: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 23

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: F.L. Pitre

Origin: Washington [no state]

Vessel: Peerless

Folder 79: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 24

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Tyra Hill

Origin: Camden, Arkansas

Vessel: P.W. Strader

Folder 80: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 24

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Fellows and Company

Origin: Camden, Arkansas

Vessel: P.W. Strader

Folder 81: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 27

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: [no name given]

Origin: Lonepine, [Louisiana]

Vessel: Leo

Folder 82: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 28

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Ellis, Bagby and Company

Origin: Jefferson, Texas

Vessel: Lotus Number 3

Folder 83: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 February 28

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Goyne, Harper and Murphy

Origin: Jefferson, Texas

Vessel: Lotus Number 3

Folder 84: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 March 1

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: Hoss and Elstner

Origin: Shreveport, Louisiana

Vessel: John T. Moore

Folder 85: Bills of lading for cotton shipped to Golsan Brothers, cotton factors and commission merchants, New Orleans, 1873 May 3

Documents. Various sizes. In English.

The seventy-four bills of lading are interfiled in chronological order with the other manuscripts (Folders 22-85) . The following is an inventory of the documents.

Shipper: A.G. Martin

Origin: Chicot, Arkansas

Vessel: R.E. Lee

Box 15: National period, 1874-1950 and undated
Folder 1: Personal letter from E[thelbert] Barksdale, Jackson, Mississippi, to Jefferson Davis, no place, 1874 January 7

Autograph letter signed. In English.

[Jefferson Davis was in New Orleans at this time, preparing to travel to England, but Barksdale may have addressed his letter to Davis' home in Memphis.] Barksdale stated that, in accordance with Davis' request, he had sent him the document relating to General Johnston's removal. Barksdale explained how he came to be in possession of it. Owing to the public controversy that resulted from his having shown it to a friend [T.J. Wharton], he had denied all other petitions for it. Davis' request left him no alternative but to accede, yet he begged Davis not to allow copies to be made or it might be printed prematurely. Johnston, in his forthcoming book, was using an abstract from memory that someone had provided to him to serve as a basis for his reply to and criticism of Davis' statement. [Published in Rowland, Jefferson Davis, His Letters...,VII, 381-382.]

Folder 2: Bill issued by the New Orleans, Mobile and Chattanooga Railroad Company, New Orleans, to Golsan and Brothers, New Orleans, 1877 September 7

Document. Signed: "pd Eaves." In English.

The bill was for transport charges.

Folder 3: Personal letter from Eugène-François Buquin, Grenoble, to "Monsieur" [name not given], [New Orleans?], 1878 August 17

Autograph letter signed. In French.

Buquin, who was trying to compile a genealogy of the D'Hauterive family, in particular the descendants of Claude Bernard D'Hauterive, wrote the addressee requesting certain data. The addressee two years before had written M. Bernard de Marigny de Morestel asking for information on Joseph Vallière D'Hauterive, who had died in New Orleans in 1797. Now, Buquin asked the addressee for the names of the four brothers of Joseph Vallière D'Hauterive, who also went to Louisiana, and the death dates of the three who were buried there.

Folder 4: Deposition made by James B. Trescazes before Donatien Augustin, Register of Bankruptcy in Louisiana, New Orleans, 1870s May 31

Document signed. In English.

Trescazes stated under oath that he owned sixty-three shares of capital stock in the bankrupt Bank of Louisiana. The stock was worth $6,300, and he was entitled to be paid out of the assets.

Folder 5: Poem written by the Reverend Father Abram J. Ryan, entitled "Erin's Flag", 1870s-1880s

Manuscript. Undated copy. In English.

This is a patriotic Irish poem written by the poet-priest of the Confederacy. [Published, with slight variations, in Poems: Patriotic, Religious, Miscellaneous. New York, 1901.]

Folder 6: Personal letter from Judah P. Benjamin, Temple, London, to Jefferson Davis, [Beauvoir, Mississippi], 1880 December 16

Autograph letter signed. Positive photostat. [Location of original unknown.] In English.

Benjamin apologized for his delay in answering Davis' letters. A severe accident had left him incapacitated for the past eight months. The pain was so intense that he was unable to sleep "without the aid of powerful narcotics," but he was now recovering. In reference to Davis' queries regarding General Joseph E. Johnston, Benjamin did not remember being at the Greensborough meeting. He gave his recollections of the meeting in 1862 March concerning Johnston's retreat. He closed with regards to Mrs. Davis. [Not in Rowland, Jefferson Davis, His Letters...]

Folder 7: Records of the Artists' Association of New Orleans, Committee on Finance and Construction, 1885 October 22-1887 November 9

Bound manuscript. Various sizes. In English.

[The Artists' Association was founded in 1885 by some of the prominent painters of New Orleans for the purpose of fostering the arts in the city. In conjunction with this goal the organization opened a school of art with several instructors, among them Julius R. Hoening. The function of the committee was to select and buy equipment and art supplies, to handle personnel, and to vote on applications for free tuition. Members of the Committee were Paul Poincy, Andrés Molinary, Theodore S. Moise, Bror Anders Wikström, and Achille Perelli.] The volume contains minutes of meetings, accounts, and lists of free pupils. The loose items consist of supply and requisition lists and receipts.

Folder 8: Poem, "The Choctaw's tale," by Gerald Norwin, 1890s

Autograph manuscript signed. In English.

The author probably submitted the manuscript for publication, as his notation at the end reads, "If not used, please return to P.O. Box 580, New York."

Folder 9: Biographical sketch and snapshot of former slave Jim Smith, by [Dr.] B[rooks] A. Colomb, circa 1910

Manuscript signed. Sketch: 28.1 centimeters x 21.5 centimeters. Photo: 104. centimeters x 8.2 centimeters. In English.

Dr. Colomb wrote and submitted to the Curtis Publishing Company for consideration a biographical sketch of a former family slave named Jim Smith who, after emancipation, continued to live and work on the Colomb plantation in Saint James Parish, for some fifty years, until his death. The snapshot showed Smith working in the fields at about age seventy-five. [Evidently the publishers returned the material to the author unused. See also a related item: Sale of slave by the widow Louis Avart to Octave Colomb, 1855 February 21.]

Folder 10: Receipt issued by Ada C. Baily, New Orleans, to J.H. Brown, no place, 1916 January 27

Autograph document signed. In English.

Bailey acknowledged receipt of $10 from Brown as payment for a gold watch with his name engraved inside.

Folder 11: Papers of Charles L. Thompson, New Orleans, 1933-1950

Eleven manuscripts, typed, and printed items in five folders (Folders 11-15). In English.

Thompson was a manuscripts collector and dealer in used books in New Orleans. His papers include telegrams from Cedric Gibbons and Rudi Blesh requesting copies of material in his possession. There are also the four following items by or about Thompson: "Complete History of New Orleans Declared Unwritten," clipping from the Times-Picayune (1933 June 11); "Personal Notes from Original Documentary Source Material in My Own Collection..." (1945); emendations by Thompson to P.E. Miller's "Fifty Years of New Orleans Jazz" in Esquire's 1945 Jazz Book; and "Chronological History of the Old French Market" (1950).

Folder 12: Papers of Charles L. Thompson, New Orleans, 1933-1950

Eleven manuscripts, typed, and printed items in five folders (Folders 11-15). In English.

Thompson was a manuscripts collector and dealer in used books in New Orleans. His papers include telegrams from Cedric Gibbons and Rudi Blesh requesting copies of material in his possession. There are also the four following items by or about Thompson: "Complete History of New Orleans Declared Unwritten," clipping from the Times-Picayune (1933 June 11); "Personal Notes from Original Documentary Source Material in My Own Collection..." (1945); emendations by Thompson to P.E. Miller's "Fifty Years of New Orleans Jazz" in Esquire's 1945 Jazz Book; and "Chronological History of the Old French Market" (1950).

Folder 13: Papers of Charles L. Thompson, New Orleans, 1933-1950

Eleven manuscripts, typed, and printed items in five folders (Folders 11-15). In English.

Thompson was a manuscripts collector and dealer in used books in New Orleans. His papers include telegrams from Cedric Gibbons and Rudi Blesh requesting copies of material in his possession. There are also the four following items by or about Thompson: "Complete History of New Orleans Declared Unwritten," clipping from the Times-Picayune (1933 June 11); "Personal Notes from Original Documentary Source Material in My Own Collection..." (1945); emendations by Thompson to P.E. Miller's "Fifty Years of New Orleans Jazz" in Esquire's 1945 Jazz Book; and "Chronological History of the Old French Market" (1950).

Folder 14: Papers of Charles L. Thompson, New Orleans, 1933-1950

Eleven manuscripts, typed, and printed items in five folders (Folders 11-15). In English.

Thompson was a manuscripts collector and dealer in used books in New Orleans. His papers include telegrams from Cedric Gibbons and Rudi Blesh requesting copies of material in his possession. There are also the four following items by or about Thompson: "Complete History of New Orleans Declared Unwritten," clipping from the Times-Picayune (1933 June 11); "Personal Notes from Original Documentary Source Material in My Own Collection..." (1945); emendations by Thompson to P.E. Miller's "Fifty Years of New Orleans Jazz" in Esquire's 1945 Jazz Book; and "Chronological History of the Old French Market" (1950).

Folder 15: Papers of Charles L. Thompson, New Orleans, 1933-1950

Eleven manuscripts, typed, and printed items in five folders (Folders 11-15). In English.

Thompson was a manuscripts collector and dealer in used books in New Orleans. His papers include telegrams from Cedric Gibbons and Rudi Blesh requesting copies of material in his possession. There are also the four following items by or about Thompson: "Complete History of New Orleans Declared Unwritten," clipping from the Times-Picayune (1933 June 11); "Personal Notes from Original Documentary Source Material in My Own Collection..." (1945); emendations by Thompson to P.E. Miller's "Fifty Years of New Orleans Jazz" in Esquire's 1945 Jazz Book; and "Chronological History of the Old French Market" (1950).

Folder 16: History of the Huchet de Kernion family, undated

Typescript. In English.

The history traces the Huchet de Kernion family from 1350 to 1869.

Folder 17: Genealogical notes concerning the ancestry of George Campbell La Bedoyere Huchet de Kernion, undated

Typescript. In English.

Campbell showed his direct descent from members of the colonial government of Louisiana under French and Spanish rule and traced his ancestry back to Guillaume Huchet, ecuyer, Sieur du Rest, son of Jean Huchet and Marie Le Lievre de Boisdanet.

Folder 18: Biographical sketch of Maurice Blanc Lanante D'Hauterive (1714-1815), undated

Manuscript. Anonymous. In English.

The sketch gave an account of D'Hauterive's distinguished career in the service of France.

Folder 19: Memoirs of Service Afloat, by Raphael Semmes, undated
Volume has been rebound. Includes only chapters 7, 8, and 34.

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